Michael Eriksen

Vaping is under fire after a series of deaths and crackdowns on flavors, said to attract children to smoking. The new vaping flavors contain nicotine salts, which deliver nicotine more quickly through the body, increasing the likelihood of addiction. The effects of electronic cigarettes on school-age children have been reported as the cause of eight deaths so far.  On Second Thought speaks with Dean of GSU’s College of Public Health, Michael Eriksen, on the latest news and developments.


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Last week, the FDA disclosed a criminal probe into electronic cigarettes as the number of vaping-related illnesses climbed. The enforcement action dovetails with an ongoing Centers For Disease Control and Prevention investigation into vaping-related illness in the U.S. 

Five hundred thirty people with a history of vaping have been diagnosed with mysterious lung injuries. Eight people have died. Five of those cases are in Georgia, with another being investigated here.


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E-cigarettes hit the market not too long ago as an aid to quit smoking. The CDC reported in 2015 that more than 9 million American adults vape regularly. Juuls are the new trendy e-cigarette that have become very popular among teens. It's an USB size e-cigarette that uses "pods" for the source of nicotine. College and high school campuses are having issues with the amount of teenagers who are taking on this new nicotine fad.