#MeToo

Leighton Rowell / GPB

From social media to Capitol Hill, conversations about sexual assault are dominating the national dialogue, taking a topic that for decades was taboo to the center of public debate.

 

We asked how these conversations have gone with your loved ones.


(AP Photo/Todd Kirkland)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Casey Cagle goes to Vegas to raise campaign cash and Brian Kemp warns voters he may be there with casinos in Georgia on his mind.  Will gambling become a major issue in the governor’s race?  Then, what’s behind Karen Handel’s rejection of President Trump’s newly imposed tariffs?  Plus, does morality in politics matter anymore?  We’ll look at Bill Clinton’s recent “tone deaf” comments on Monica Lewinsky and the #MeToo movement, Ralph Reed’s defense of President Trump’s behavior and a poll that shows more Americans than ever are just fine with pornography.


Amid The #MeToo Movement, 'A Call To Men'

May 14, 2018
Wolfmann / Wikimedia Commons

The #MeToo movement picked up last year after numerous women came forward with allegations of sexual harassment and abuse against Miramax Film founder Harvey Weinstein. More women around the world, in turn, seem to feel more empowered to talk about the sexual abuse that they too survived.

Leighton Rowell / GPB

This week we talked about the psychology of newlyweds, an unsung civil rights hero and the future of local news. So, as always, we invited a group of smart people to help us break down the week's biggest headlines.

Natalie Pawelski, vice president of Cater Communications, conservative radio host Greg Williams, Kennesaw State University Roxanne Donovan and Decatur-based author Nicki Salcedo joined this week's Breakroom.

In the year since President Trump took office, a new wave of social movements has rippled across the country. March for Science Atlanta brings together scientists, data geeks and average citizens to push for policies that support and reflect research. The group will hold its annual Rally for Science April 14. The Rally for Science keynote speaker is Emory University professor Linda DeGutis. She previously served as director of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at the CDC. DeGutis will speak on the importance of gun violence research. We spoke with DeGutis and March for Science organizers Louis Kiphen and Allison Halterman.

It's On Us

College students gathered at Emory University last weekend for RespectCon, a conference that centers on student conversations and the ways they help sexual assault victims find justice.

Leighton Rowell / GPB

Today in the Breakroom we talked about this week's top stories.

Reid Williams / GPB News

In the last year, Hollywood has been rocked by scandal. Some of the most powerful figures in the industry were accused of sexual misconduct. There’s an initiative in Georgia called Safety Shot that’s trying to address sexual abuse within the state’s film industry. We talked with two of Safety Shot’s founders: filmmaker Suzan Satterfield and actress Laura Lundy.

 Interview Highlights

A week ago, Brenda Fitzgerald resigned as director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The revelation she holds financial stakes in a tobacco company -- and thus has a major conflict of interest -- comes as the CDC faces enormous budget cuts. The agency is preparing to downsize its global epidemic prevention programs by about 80 percent. Should we be worried about the CDC’s ability to do its job? We talked with former CDC director Tom Frieden and Andy Miller of Georgia Health News.

On this special edition of Political Rewind, we look back at the year in politics. From new leadership in Atlanta to the fight for a new governor of Georgia and an expensive fight for a congressional seat. There was also President Trump, tax reform, health care reform, the Mueller Russia investigation, the resignation of one Georgian from the president’s cabinet and the firing of another, plus the #MeToo movement that sent tremors through Washington. All were big stories in 2017, but which ranked as the biggest according to our panel?

Pexels

#MeToo is not only a movement about sexual harassment. As Rebecca Traister put it in The Cut, it’s a reckoning for the way we work, and a call to change the power dynamics leading to sexual abuse.

Zoe Wangstrom / GPB

The Breakroom overcomes the snowpocalypse to discuss a juicy week of news. We’ll weigh "House of Cards" minus Kevin Spacey, Atlanta’s abysmal voter turnout, and TIME Magazine’s Person of the Year. We’ll also dig into the truth of Jack Daniels and think about the best way to tip waiters. Joining us in the Breakroom are Howard Franklin, Natalie Pawelski, Greg Williams, and Kalena Boller. 

It has created a wave of awareness and brave confrontations over sexual harassment and assault, taking down powerful men in the process. And now the #MeToo movement has been named Time magazine's Person of the Year for 2017.

On its cover, Time called the people behind the movement "The Silence Breakers." Its story features women and men who have spoken out — including activist Tarana Burke, who started the hashtag 10 years ago.

Imagine being in outer space with two sassy robots, and being forced to watch really bad science fiction movies with them. That’s the premise of the cult classic TV series, “Mystery Science Theater 3000.” The show got a reboot on Netflix this summer. We talk with series creator Joel Hodgson.

Atlanta Activists Respond To #MeToo

Oct 20, 2017

Over the last week, stories about sexual assault and harassment have flooded social media with the “Me Too” hashtag. It’s meant to raise awareness about these abuses in the wake of allegations against film producer Harvey Weinstein.