Mental Health

Ángel Cabrera
Georgia Tech

The Georgia Institute of Technology has a new president. Ángel Cabrera has been on the job for just under two months.

He formally steps into the role in a ceremony Monday.


Pexels.com

When Jeffrey Epstein died by suicide last month in a New York Corrections Facility, questions about the state of mental healthcare in America’s prisons briefly dominated the national news.

But suicides in jails and prisons are becoming more and more commonplace – especially in Georgia.  The state has one of the highest rates of inmate suicide in the nation, nearly double the national average.


Atlanta magazine calculates students who graduate from some of Georgia’s largest schools end up with an average of $27,000 in debt. Before it’s time to go back to school, examine the real price of higher education. On Second Thought is joined by freelance journalist Sean Keenan.


CCSD

As mental health becomes a political talking point, Georgia schools are finding innovative ways to make social and emotional learning part of the curriculum.  

Dr. Debra Murdock is the executive director for Cherokee County School District's Social Emotional Learning initiative. She spoke to On Second Thought on the importance of sustaining mental balance for students.


As mental health becomes a political talking point, Georgia schools are finding innovative ways to make social and emotional learning part of the curriculum.  

Dr. Debra Murdock is the Executive Director for Cherokee County School District's Social Emotional Learning initiative. She spoke to On Second Thought on the importance of sustaining mental balance for students.


Contributed

President Donald Trump and other Republican leaders are again pointing to mental health as an influence in the nation’s most recent mass shootings, but one Fulton County high school student said he disagrees with the rhetoric and wants more funding for mental health care in public schools.

Ethan Asher, 17, of Roswell, founded the Georgia chapter of March For Our Lives last year after the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. He was most recently announced as one of the national winners of the 2019 Diller Teen Award, a $36,000 award for teens making positive impacts in their community.

Macon Woman Wants Mental Health Care Available To All

Aug 10, 2019

It’s 9 a.m. on a Saturday morning just after the Fourth of July, and Nancy Cleveland is on the move.

She joins a group of about 20 Macon residents in Central City Park to help them harness the power of nature as a healing force. They’ve come to participate in a program called Walk With A Doc, bearing ailments from major depression to hypertension. Cleveland — a 2019 recipient of the annual Emerging City Champions (ECC) grant — walks with them.


silencetheshame.com

Originally aired in July of 2018:

A study published in the medical journal JAMA Pediatrics found that African American children under the age of 12 are taking their lives at roughly twice the rate of their white counterparts.

Tricia Hersey

Your Fourth of July plans may include parades, pool parties, cookouts or the Peachtree Road Race. Tricia Hersey plans to celebrate with a nice, long nap. The founder of The Nap Ministry, Hersey is known to many as a champion of rest. Some even call her the Nap Bishop.

Hersey dreamed up The Nap Ministry while a divinity student at Emory University's Candler School of Theology. Graduate school had taken a toll on her sleep, and consequently her health, so she made the decision to rest. She joined On Second Thought in studio to preach the benefits of rest and share about her ministry, which she sees as a form of self care and social justice.  


Forsyth Farmers' Market Facebook page

As June closes out and we enter into the second half of the year, Savannah offers plenty of events to engage with from panels on mental health to final celebrations of Pride Month. Marianne Ganem Poppell of Savannah Master Calendar and Mahogany Bowers of Blessings in a Bookbag have your guide. 


pxhere

There has been a huge push to end the stigma, the bigotry and intolerance surrounding the LGBT+ community.  

 

But despite that, for many people who identify as LGBT+, there are still  experiences and memories of discrimination, violence and familial rejection which are recognized as significant factors contributing to mental health concerns.

 

Atlanta Public Schools

Terrilyn Rivers-Cannon didn't always want to be a social worker. Growing up in Savannah, she wanted to become an attorney.

Rivers-Cannon didn't decide until she was about to graduate high school that she might be interested in following in the footsteps of her aunt, a professor of social work who for years had shared stories at family dinners about the people she helped.


Joy Harden / Therapy for Black Girls

African Americans are 10% more likely to report experiencing serious mental health problems than their white counterparts, according to the Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health. Even when people have the resources to access professional help, they might not find psychologists who look like them or share their experiences.

The podcast Therapy for Black Girls promotes mental and emotional wellness for African American women. It offers resources on topics like anxiety, body image and perfectionism. Joy Harden, an Atlanta-based psychologist, hosts the podcast. She joined On Second Thought to discuss her work and the podcast's evolution since 2017.

 


The People Speak! / Flickr

May is Mental Health Awareness Month, and concerns around mental health are a big issue in our society at large — and on college campuses.

Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among college students, and national data indicates that the problem is not unique.


May is Mental Health Awareness Month. College students today increasingly report being affected by depression and anxiety. Barry Schreier, director of the University Counseling Service at the University of Iowa and communications committee chair for the Association of University and College Counseling Center Directors, joined On Second Thought to explain the national scope of this problem and told us why exactly students are more stressed, depressed and anxious now than ever before.


Hope Givers Festival / Twitter

The U.S. Mental Health Care System is a multi-billion dollar industry, yet countless people living with or affected by mental illness fall through the cracks.

Georgia ranks 47th out of 50 for access to mental health care, resources and insurance coverage making it even tougher to live with disorders most data and experts find to be under-researched, undertreated and over-stigmatized.

Ellen Eldridge / GPB News

The first of six regional School-Based Behavioral Health Forums was held this week at The Carter Center in Atlanta.

Panels addressed ways to make the most of the $8.4 million in funding Gov. Brian Kemp pledged to pay for more mental health counselors in schools through the Georgia Apex Program.

Joy Harden / Therapy for Black Girls

African-Americans are 10 percent more likely to report experiencing serious mental health problems than their white counterparts, according to the Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health. Even when people have the resources to access professional help, they might not find psychologists who look like them or share their experiences.

The podcast, "Therapy for Black Girls," promotes mental and emotional wellness for African-American women. It offers resources on topics like anxiety, body image and perfectionism. Joy Harden, an Atlanta-based psychologist, hosts the podcast. She joined "On Second Thought" to discuss her work and the podcast's evolution since 2017.

GPB

Georgia has a new tool to help those suffering from mental health issues.

Gov. Brian Kemp announced an app to go along with the Georgia Crisis and Access Line or GCAL. The hotline, which launched in 2006, receives almost 1,000 calls each day. Now, the state is adding a GCAL app.

The People Speak! / Flickr

Amid the stress of college finals last semester, two Georgia Tech students died by suicide. National data indicate the problem is not unique to one school. Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among college student, and about 1 in 12 students has a suicide plan, according to the National College Health Assessment.

Georgia Tech has been working to address mental health concerns on campus, allocating millions of dollars to expand resources.

Today's show explored social justice through the lens of dance and mental health initiatives across college campuses.

Atlanta choreographer and dancer Raianna Brown joined "On Second Thought" to discuss activism and dance. In 2016, she gained attention online for kneeling during a college football game. Now, Brown is continuing her advocacy with movement. She discussed her new dance production, “Skid," a look at homelessness and gentrification in the metro Atlanta area.

Rich Pedroncelli / AP Photo/File

The American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia is asking a federal appeals court to force the Georgia Department of Corrections to provide medical care for a mentally disabled prisoner.

Jeffery Geter has been an inmate at Baldwin State Prison since 1998. He is now suffering with Parkinson's disease, a brain tumor, epilepsy and, possibly, Alzheimer's disease, ACLU Legal Director Sean Young said.

Andy Harrison / Georgia Department of Agriculture

Casey Cox is a sixth-generation farmer. She returned to Camilla, in southwest Georgia, after graduating from the University of Florida in 2013. Since then, she's continued the tasks that make up her family tradition.

It’s that commitment to the land and her family’s legacy that makes recovering from events such as a hurricane or a trade war a necessity. It’s also why the conversation has shifted to farmers’ mental health.


Courtesy AP Images

Suicide is the second leading cause of death among 15 to 29-year-olds in the United States. A 2018 study from the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention shows suicide rates increased by 16 percent in Georgia between 1996 and 2016.

 

Tech giant Facebook wants to help prevent suicide with artificial intelligence.

Public Domain

Farmers' mental health was on the two-day agenda as dozens of professors and social workers met in Atlanta this week. They gathered with professionals from a few other states to discuss the top stressors to people in rural America, especially farmers.


Ross Terrell / GPB News

Hundreds of African-Americans met in downtown Atlanta Tuesday for the first State of Black Health conference.


Ellen Eldridge / GPB News

The media has a big role to play in suicide prevention, officials said Thursday.

Especially when it comes to at-risk children as young as 9 years old, Georgia Bureau of Investigation Agent Trebor Randle said Thursday to a group of healthcare journalists.

Suicide is a serious public health issue and the second leading cause of death for people between the ages of 10 and 39, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

On Second Thought for Tuesday, July 10, 2018

Jul 10, 2018
GPB

Just over a year ago, the Federal Bureau of Investigation arrested a 25-year-old woman in Augusta, Georgia for allegedly leaking top secret information from the National Security Agency to the press. Last month, Reality Winner pled guilty to violating the Espionage Act. Winner was sentenced to 63 months in prison and three years of supervised release. Her prosecution is the first in the trump administration’s crackdown on whistleblowers.

 


The People Speak! / Flickr

Stigma can be one of the main reasons people with mental illness might not seek treatment or take their medication.

In communities of color, that stigma can be worse. In a race conscious society, many say they don’t want to be perceived as having yet another deficit.

 


Georgia Mother Remembers Late Son

Jun 12, 2018
Screenshot by GPB / Twitter

Suicide is a leading cause of death in Georgia and has touched the lives of many people in the state. Schrence Echols of Fairburn, Georgia, lost her son Marquise Tolbert in 2012, when Tolbert took his own life.

 


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