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On this edition of Political Rewind, Democratic presidential candidates are dueling over a variety of proposals for improving delivery. We’ve heard them tout their various plans for Medicare for All or a public option to Obamacare, all while promoting “universal health care.”

What do these terms really mean and how would they be paid for? Our panel explores the health care debate’s terms and explains the proposals.

 


Joe Biden, left,  speaks during a presidential candidates forum in Des Moines, Iowa. Bernie Sanders, right,  participates in a rally in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Charlie Neibergall/Jacqueline Larma / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, members of Georgia’s congressional delegation respond to President Trump’s tweets urging Democratic congresswoman of color to go back where they came from.


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Earlier in June, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported that 17,000 poor, elderly or disabled Georgians had lost their Medicaid benefits. The Georgia Department of Community Health said their accounts were terminated for not responding to renewal notices. Now, the AJC reports state officials have revealed the full number of people slated to lose Medicaid is closer to 30,000.

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On this edition of Political Rewind, healthcare has become one of the hottest issues on the campaign trail during the 2018 Midterm Election. In the race for governor, Stacey Abrams and Brian Kemp continue to duel over the expansion of Medicaid.

 

When Sol Shipotow enrolled in a new Medicare Advantage health plan earlier this year, he expected to keep the doctor who treats his serious eye condition.

"That turned out not to be so," said Shipotow, 83, who lives in Bensalem, Pa.

Shipotow said he had to scramble to get back onto a health plan that he could afford and that his longtime eye specialist would accept. "You have to really understand your policy," he said. "I thought it was the same coverage."

Almost 100 hospitals reported suspicious data on dangerous infections to Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services officials, but the agency did not follow up or examine any of the cases in depth, according to a report by the Health and Human Services inspector general's office.

Most hospitals report how many infections strike patients during treatment, meaning the infections are likely contracted inside the facility. Each year, Medicare is supposed to review up to 200 cases in which hospitals report suspicious infection-tracking results.

Drug companies could be forgiven if they're confused about whether President Trump thinks the government should get involved in negotiating the price of prescription drugs for Medicare patients.

Just a few days before Trump was sworn in, he said the pharmaceutical industry was "getting away with murder" in the way it prices medicine, and he promised to take the industry on. It was a promise he'd made repeatedly on the campaign trail.

The federal government has cut payments to 769 hospitals with high rates of patient injuries, for the first time counting the spread of antibiotic-resistant germs in assessing penalties.

The punishments come in the third year of Medicare penalties for hospitals with patients most frequently suffering from potentially avoidable complications, including various types of infections, blood clots, bed sores and falls. This year the government also examined the prevalence of two types of bacteria resistant to drugs.

Donna Nickerson spent her last working years as the activity and social services director at a Turlock, Calif., nursing home.

But when she developed Alzheimer's disease and needed that kind of care herself, she and her husband couldn't afford it: A bed at a nearby home cost several thousand dollars a month.

"I'm not a wealthy man," said Nickerson's husband Mel, a retired California State University-Stanislaus professor. "There's no way I could pay for that."