Medicaid Waiver

Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Gov. Brian Kemp’s proposal to expand Medicaid with a waiver-application process is being met with backlash.


Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Georgia is currently ranked third among states with most uninsured residents.  More than 1.4 million Georgians were without insurance in 2018.

Governor Kemp announced the second of two healthcare waiver proposals to increase coverage on Monday. If approved, the waivers will allow the state of Georgia to remain compliant with the Federal Affordable Care Act — making changes to the health insurance market in the state without expanding Medicaid.

Georgia is currently one of 14 states that have chosen to not fully expand Medicaid.


pexels.com

Georgia residents in Smyrna and Covington are just now learning that their neighborhoods have an elevated cancer risk because of exposure to airborne toxins.

In August 2018, the Environmental Protection Agency published a report showing 109 census tracts with high concentrations of ethylene oxide, a gas used to sterilize medical equipment. Two use before, the agency placed the chemical on a list of those that “definitely cause cancer.”

In this Friday, Jan. 24, 2014 photo, a worker is seen behind the registration window of the emergency room at Grady Memorial Hospital, in Atlanta.
David Goldman / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, a conversation with Grady Hospital President and CEO John Haupert on the many crises that public health institutions across the country continue to face.


Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp
(AP Photo/John Bazemore)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Gov. Kemp has signed into law his signature issue of the 2019 legislative session. Kemp now has the power to set the course for expansion of Medicaid and to determine possible subsidies for Georgians who buy insurance through Obamacare. We look at the political implications for Kemp’s victory.

 


Grant Blankenship / GPB

The Georgia Senate approved a bill Tuesday that would allow Georgia to seek waivers from Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act.

SB 106, the "Patients First Act," would use $1 million in state funding and a match from the federal government to hire consultants to research options to expand health care access to low and moderate income Georgians.