Medicaid

Medicaid.georgia.gov

After 30,000 poor, elderly and disabled people were cut from Medicaid, the Department of Community Health said it would reinstate benefits to 17,000 people.

Atlanta Journal-Constitution health reporter Ariel Hart spoke with On Second Thought last week about her breaking story. On Friday, she reported that state officials still believe they properly notified most of those people before cutting their benefits, but out of “an abundance of caution” they will restart the process, said Blake Fulenwider, the agency’s chief health policy officer.

Read the story on AJC.com

Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger during an election commisison meeting in Macon. On Wednesday, Raffensperger annonuced Georgia will hold its presidential primary on March 24, 2020.
Stephen Fowler / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, President Donald Trump's internal polls show him behind in Georgia, Florida and other key states. His campaign rally in Orlando gave the audience a glimpse of the themes on which he will run.


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Earlier in June, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported that 17,000 poor, elderly or disabled Georgians had lost their Medicaid benefits. The Georgia Department of Community Health said their accounts were terminated for not responding to renewal notices. Now, the AJC reports state officials have revealed the full number of people slated to lose Medicaid is closer to 30,000.

Brian Kemp waves after being sworn in as Georgia's governor during a ceremony at Georgia Tech's McCamish Pavilion, Monday, Jan. 14, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
John Bazemore / AP Photos

On this edition of Political Rewind, Gov. Brian Kemp is working on building a new healthcare waiver system. The governor has hired a firm to draw up plans in hopes of expanding Medicaid and giving a financial boost to private insurance buyers. How broad will the expansion program be and will there be a role for outside input before plans are finalized? 


In this Friday, Jan. 24, 2014 photo, a worker is seen behind the registration window of the emergency room at Grady Memorial Hospital, in Atlanta.
David Goldman / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, a conversation with Grady Hospital President and CEO John Haupert on the many crises that public health institutions across the country continue to face.


Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp
(AP Photo/John Bazemore)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Gov. Kemp has signed into law his signature issue of the 2019 legislative session. Kemp now has the power to set the course for expansion of Medicaid and to determine possible subsidies for Georgians who buy insurance through Obamacare. We look at the political implications for Kemp’s victory.

 


Brian Kemp waves after being sworn in as Georgia's governor during a ceremony at Georgia Tech's McCamish Pavilion in Atlanta.
John Bazemore / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, two major policy proposals are taking shape at the legislature right now. A Senate committee has voted to give Gov. Kemp the power to determine the future of Medicaid expansion in Georgia. The measure is sure to be hotly contested by Democratic lawmakers.


Division of Youth and Family Services

A proposal to allow Gov. Brian Kemp to pursue Medicaid waivers from the federal government was approved by a Georgia Senate committee Tuesday.

The Senate Health & Human Services Committee voted 9-4 to approve a bill authorizing Kemp's office to pursue the waivers after lawmakers sped through testimony and questions in a one-hour meeting.

Ted S. Warren / GPB News

Republicans in the Senate have filed a bill that would give Gov. Brian Kemp authorization to submit a pair of waivers for the state's Medicaid and Affordable Care Act plans next year. 

SB 106, also known as the Patients First Act, would provide the latitude for Kemp to submit what's known as an 1115 wavier to the Department of Health and Human Services for Medicaid and a 1332 waiver to HHS and the Treasury for the ACA by June 30 of 2020.


A Transportation Security Administration employee checks an air traveler's identification at Hartsfield Jackson Atlanta International Airport Monday, Jan. 7, 2019, in Atlanta.
John Bazemore / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, as legislators continue budget hearings at the state capitol, attention has shifted to spending priorities for the coming year.


GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, House of Representatives Speaker David Ralston joins us just days before he gavels in the 2019 Session.

 

Patrick Sison / AP/File

On this edition of Political Rewind, healthcare has become one of the hottest issues on the campaign trail during the 2018 Midterm Election. In the race for governor, Stacey Abrams and Brian Kemp continue to duel over the expansion of Medicaid.

 

Georgia gubernatorial candidates Stacey Abrams, left, and Brian Kemp.
(AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton/John Amis)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Brian Kemp thinks there is a gang problem in Georgia and has laid out his plans for a new group to battle the issue. The Republican candidate for governor has come under scrutiny for figures he used to highlight the problem.


Political Rewind: The Divide Over Medicaid

Sep 11, 2018

On this edition of Political Rewind, Stacey Abrams unveils a proposal she says will provide health care to the neediest Georgians.  The Kemp campaign says Abrams’ plan to expand Medicaid is a non-starter, but they have yet to announce how they’ll address a problem voters say is high on their list of priorities.


A worker is seen behind the registration window of the emergency room at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta.
(AP Photo/David Goldman)

On this edition of Political Rewind, we take a broad look at healthcare in Georgia. After multiple attempts, Congress has failed to shut down The Affordable Care Act, but President Donald Trump is eliminating a number of key provisions through executive orders. What’s the likely impact on Georgians of ending the individual mandate?


If you're poor, uninsured and have a bad car wreck or fall seriously ill, there's a chance in most states to enroll for Medicaid after the fact. If you qualify for Medicaid, the program will pay your medical bills going back three months.

This "retroactive eligibility" provides financial protection as patients await approval of their Medicaid applications. It protects hospitals, too, from having to absorb the costs of caring for these patients.

Russ Bynum / AP Photo

On this edition of "Political Rewind," another mass shooting rocks the country. Is easy access to guns to blame? In Georgia, new efforts are underway to move away from the past in a city that was a key part of the Civil War. We discuss. Also, a Republican legislator says it’s time to move past “repeal and replace” and look to using Obamacare to expand Medicaid in Georgia, but with a narrow purpose in mind. Plus, candidates for mayor of Atlanta gear up to get out the vote for Tuesday’s election.

When Taylor Merendo moved to Bloomington, Ind., nearly two years ago, fleeing an abusive marriage, she needed help.

"I was six months pregnant and at that point in time, I really didn't have a stable place to live," Merendo says.

Two former directors of Medicaid — one who served under a Democrat, the other under a Republican — are asking Congress not to change Medicaid right now.

Is Medicaid the best health care possible?

A lot of people who use it seem to think so.

A new study released by Harvard's Chan School of Public Health shows that people enrolled in Medicaid are overwhelmingly satisfied with their coverage and care.

It was about a year ago that Ornella Mouketou walked into the emergency room at the George Washington University Hospital in Washington, D.C., and told them she wanted to end her life.

She was in her early 20s, unemployed and depressed.

"I was just walking around endlessly. I was walking around parks, and I was just crying all the time," she says. "It was like an empty black hole."

Montana was one of the last states to expand Medicaid, and its Obamacare marketplace is doing pretty well. It has 50,000 customers, decent competition and no places that have come to be called "bare counties" — where no insurers want to sell plans.

Still, the three insurers selling in Montana now say that if GOP plans to cut Medicaid and repeal the individual mandate go through, it will mean higher costs all around.

This week, as senators have decamped from Washington for the Fourth of July recess, the future of the Senate's Affordable Care Act replacement plan — and by extension, Medicaid — remains uncertain.

In late May, several senators went to the floor of the Senate to talk about people in their states who are affected by the opioid crisis. Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., talked about Chelsea Carter.

"She told me her drug habit began when she was 12 years old," said Capito.

Alex E. Proimos / Foter

The U.S. Senate’s proposed health care overhaul is likely to cut health coverage for poor people and children. We talk about what’s in the bill and the potential consequences with Georgia Health News Editor Andy Miller, Georgia Budget & Policy Institute Health Policy Analyst Laura Harker, and Karoline Mortensen, Professor of Health Sector Management and Policy at the University of Miami.

On Second Thought For Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Jun 28, 2017

First, President Trump recently unveiled new trade restrictions with Cuba. We look at how this will impact Georgia’s poultry industry. Joining us is James Sumner, President of the USA Poultry & Egg Export Council and Marisa Anne Pagnattaro, Associate Dean for UGA’s Terry College of Business.

Medicaid is the government health care program for the poor.

That's the shorthand explanation. But Medicaid is so much more than that — which is why it has become the focal point of the battle in Washington to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

President Trump's full budget proposal for fiscal year 2018, to be released Tuesday, calls for a $9.2 billion, or 13.5 percent, spending cut to education. The cuts would be spread across K-12 and aid to higher education, according to documents released by the White House.

None of this can be finalized without Congress. And the political track record for Presidents who want to reduce education funding is not promising, even in a far less poisoned atmosphere than the one that hovers over Washington right now.

Student loans

Updated at 3:02 p.m. ET.

The Trump administration says it can balance the federal budget within a decade. Its proposal calls for significant cuts to social safety net programs and assumes more robust economic growth.

The administration released what it calls a "Taxpayer First" budget on Tuesday.

"This is, I think, the first time in a long time that an administration has written a budget through the eyes of the people who are actually paying the taxes," White House Budget Director Mick Mulvaney told reporters in a briefing on Monday.

Republicans will be tested today on the strength of party unity in the Trump era and their party's ability to deliver on the promises they've made to the voters that sent them here.

"This is our chance and this is our moment. It's a big moment," House Speaker Paul Ryan told reporters earlier this week. "And I think our members are beginning to appreciate just what kind of a 'rendezvous with destiny' we have right here."

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