maternal mortality

Georgia State Capitol
GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia legislative panels will meet this week to examine two major health concerns: improving mental and developmental outcomes for young children and addressing the high maternal death rate in Georgia. Our panel discusses how we can expect the legislature to deal with these issues.


Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The number of mothers who die from pregnancy-related complications has not declined, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

That means women in Georgia — especially in rural parts of the state where access to maternity care is limited or nonexistent —  are more likely to die from pregnancy-related complications than in countries much poorer than the United States.

But, the CDC said Tuesday in its Vital Signs report, that most of these deaths are preventable.

Women in Georgia are more likely to die from pregnancy-related and associated complications than in Uzbekistan. The state allocated $2 million to help reduce that number in this year's health budget.

On Second Thought spoke with Wanda Irving, whose daughter, Shalon, died after giving birth in metro Atlanta, and Breanna Lipscomb, U.S. maternal health campaign manager for The Center For Reproductive Rights, about efforts to improve maternal health outcomes in Georgia and across the nation.


Mac Prv/Flickr

Women in Georgia are more likely to die from pregnancy-related and associated complications than in Uzbekistan. The state allocated $2 million to help reduce that number in this year's health budget.