mass incarceration

wikipedia.commons

This week, Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta will host the ‘Ending Mass Incarceration’ Conference.


Courtesy Magda Ehlers / Pexels

In his first State of the State speech, Gov. Nathan Deal said criminal justice reform would be at the top of his to-do list. As Deal prepares to leave office eight years later, Georgia's prison population is 12 percent smaller than previously projected. The incarceration rate for black men is down 30 percent and the number of people committed to the Department of Juvenile Justice has dropped 46 percent.

For those who have served time, staying out of the system is an uphill climb, which is where Gangstas to Growers digs in. The Atlanta program helps young people who have been incarcerated get back on track – through urban farming, education and activism. 


Actor Tony Hale first rose to fame as the ultimate mother's boy Buster Bluth on the show "Arrested Development." Hale also starred in the HBO series “Veep.”  His character was the personal assistant to President Selina Meyer, played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus. Hale's parents live in the Macon area and he spends a lot of time in Georgia. We talked with him in 2016 about his career. 

May is Older Americans Month. In 2017, Georgia ranked 41st in the nation for senior health. GPB Special Correspondent Celeste Headlee talked about the state of our elder care system with Kathy Floyd, executive director for the Georgia Council on Aging, and Glenn Ostir, director of the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Georgia.

This year's Pulitzer Prize winners and finalists were announced Tuesday. We listened back to interviews with four past and present honorees. Renee Montagne was named a 2018 finalist for her investigation examining racial disparity in maternal deaths. James Forman Jr. won the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction for his book "Locking Up Our Own:  Crime and Punishment in Black America." We also revisited conversations with Alfred Uhry, who won the Pulitzer for drama in 1988, as well as Bill Dedman, who in 1989 won the prize for investigative reporting.  

The City of Atlanta is still dealing with the fallout from a massive cyberattack Thursday. Since a group of hackers locked down the city's computer system with a malware called Ransomware, city employees have been unable to carry out essential business. Atlanta residents can't even pay their bills online. 

Atlanta mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms has condemned the attack. She has yet to confirm if the city will pay the $50,000 ransom hackers have demanded in exchange for the city to regain access to its data. Georgia Public Broadcasting reporter Emily Cureton updated us on the latest developments in the data breach. We also spoke with Milos Prvulovic, a professor in Georgia Tech's School of Computer Science.

For nearly three decades, Anthony Ray Hinton lived on Alabama's death row. 

When he was convicted in 1985 for allegedly murdering two restaurant managers, there were no witnesses. There were no fingerprints. And Hinton always maintained his innocence. 

In April 2015, the state of Alabama overturned his conviction and dropped all charges against him. He had spent nearly half his life in prison. 

We spoke with Hinton about his wrongful incarceration, what kept him fighting for justice and life since his exoneration. 

Left Bank Books

A new book explores why so many young men of color wind up in prison. “Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America,” is the work of Yale Law School Professor James Forman, Jr. His father was a leader of SNCC -- the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. Forman, Jr. is a graduate of Atlanta’s Roosevelt High. He joins us in the studio. 

A new book explores why so many young men of color wind up in prison. “Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America” is the work of Yale Law School Professor James Forman, Jr. His father was a leader of SNCC -- the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. Forman, Jr. is also a graduate of Atlanta’s Roosevelt High. He joins us in the studio.