Macon

Ways to Connect

Crime, Cops & Community: Battling Public Distrust

Mar 20, 2016
Savannah Chatham Metropolitan Police Department

Savannah has one of the highest murder rates in Georgia. And last year that number went up by nearly 70 percent. But a spike in crime doesn't happen overnight. City leaders blame years of corruption in the police department. They say it’s bred public distrust. Now they’re working to get it back.

Leah Fleming / GPB Macon

There is always something to do in Middle Georgia, but this month there's an abundance of things to do!  It's Cherry Blossom festival time in the cherry blossom capital of the world.  Macon is all pink and ready to celebrate spring with a host of events. 

March 19 | 3:00 PM - Cherry Street @ Third Street 

Presented By GEICO And 41 NBC/WMGT

Candidates for a host of local elections in May are all lined up.  Qualifying ended earlier this month.  Let the stumping begin.  Each week journalists Leah Fleming and Charles Richardson talk about the hot topics on the minds of Middle Georgians.  See the video from the studio!

HOT TOPIC #1:

In Macon Bibb the mayor’s race between incumbent Robert Reichert and former commissioner Lonzy Edwards is underway.  Who is Lonzy Edwards and what are his chances against a very popular incumbent?

HOT TOPIC #2:

Pedestrian Deaths In Georgia Spike

Mar 17, 2016

The number of pedestrian deaths has risen in Georgia.  

The state Office of Highway Safety confirms that last year the number of people hit and killed by cars increased by 21 percent from 2014. Office Director Harris Blackwood: 

'We had a terrible year last year,' said Harris Blackwood, the director of the Office of Highway Safety. 'There's no other way to describe it. We went back to levels we hadn't seen since 2008'

Tennessee Surf Rock With Repeat Repeat

Mar 15, 2016
Grant Blankenship / GPB

Repeat Repeat started its life as surf rock from high atop the Cumberland Plateau. East Nashville, Tenn. to be exact.

WGN America

A new TV series called “Underground” premieres Wednesday night on WGN America.  It tells the story of a slave escape from a Macon, Georgia plantation in the late 1850s.

Actor Aldis Hodge of “Straight Outta Compton” stars in the series. We talk with him about how he prepared to take on the role. 

A Rural Hospital Needs Tax Dollars to Ward Off Closing

Mar 9, 2016

The hospital in Sandersville - Washington County Regional Medical Center - serves thousands of people in east central Georgia.

 

But, like so many hospitals in rural Georgia, it runs in the red. That's because of a combination of poor management decisions and struggles common to health care facilities in less populated areas.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Anthony Ponder has been cutting hair for most of his life. He has also spent a lot of time in prison. Ponder lost his equipment the last time he was incarcerated. A pair of Macon churches have set him up with gear again. In return he is cutting hair on Sunday mornings for other men who like him are getting back on their feet.

"I was told that my father was a barber. My father got killed when I was seven years old but I often heard that he was a barber. Maybe that stuck in my head that I wanted to be like my father.”

 

In this session, Col. Bruce Hampton recorded at Capricorn Studio.

Col. Bruce is a legend of Georgia music who has been unafraid to wave his freak flag high since the 1960s. In this interview with Chris Nylund and Jared Wright of the Field Note Stenographers music collective, Col. Bruce introduces us to the numerology of Southern humidity and gives us a glimpse of the weird heyday of a late 60s music boomtown called Macon. A note, in this first story, Gregg is none other than Gregg Allman.

In this month's preview of music coming to Macon, we look forward to the holy drone of Lobo Marino, to a tsunami of surf punk from Repeat Repeat, a show from a godfather of lo-fi recording, and to a visit from a veteran of the deep soul scene. With the Field Note Stenographers. 

    

Paying for Crumbling Stormwater Systems

Feb 23, 2016
Grant Blankenship / Georgia Public Broadcasting

 

Clay Murphey, a project manager for Macon Bibb County, walked through an eight-foot-high stormwater culvert under a busy intersection. As sloshed through three inches of water, Murphey ran a hand along a jagged crack in the dusty red brick.

"This is the stuff we're concerned about. These large cracks," Murphey said. “You got seepage that's coming from above. That shouldn't be happening. Everytime you're seeping, you are washing away the mortar that's holding this brick in place.”

Then Murphey pointed down to brick rubble lying in the water.

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