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On this edition of Political Rewind, the Georgia Senate entertains a bill that would crack down on protestors who disrupt controversial speakers on university campuses.  Does it protect or intrude upon free speech?  Also, a traditionally conservative Georgia newspaper takes aim at one of the state senate’s most conservative members on the issue of adoption.  Plus, legislation sponsored by Georgia Senator David Perdue is in the sights of a bi-partisan group of legislators on Capitol Hill.  They fear Purdue’s efforts to reduce legal immigration could threaten a compromise that would prevent a

The GOP tax bill has many concerned the law will negatively impact the middle class while bolstering the rich. But a new study from the union Actors Equity finds another problem: the tax bill could also harm Georgia’s film industry. They looked at how the plan might reduce deductions and reimbursements for contractors and part-time film workers. We talk about this with Chris Joyner with the Atlanta Journal-Constitution -- he writes the AJC Watchdog column. Also Craig Miller, Film Producer and Founder of Craig Miller Productions.

Courtesy of Anya Silver

Poet Anya Silver often writes about depression, fear, and living with cancer. But her latest collection “Second Bloom” is also about life and joy.

(AP Photo/David Goldman)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the first major battles between candidates for governor break out in both the GOP and Democratic contests.  Brian Kemp accuses Casey Cagle of falling for a liberal conspiracy theory, while supporters of Democrat Stacey Abrams accuse Stacey Evans of using the image of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to advance her campaign.  Plus, Speaker of the House David Ralston weighs in on the idea of giving the state oversight of Hartsfield Jackson International Airport and Medicaid Expansion.

Panelists:

On tomorrow’s edition of “Two Way Street,” we’re exploring the work and life of Georgian Flannery O’Connor. Her works “Wise Blood” and “A Good Man is Hard to Find” earned her a reputation as one most important writers of the 20th Century. The making of that reputation is the focus of tomorrow’s conversation.

On this edition of Political Rewind, big issues bubbling up at the state capitol: legislators renew their interest in state oversight of Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport and a  possible return of paper balloting across Georgia.  

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Many Georgia neighborhoods are stranded in food deserts, where fresh edibles are few and far between. One potential remedy is urban farming. Across the state, farmers and community leaders grow food in the neighborhoods that need it most. And it’s getting easier than ever to start growing if you want to make a difference.

(AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

On this edition of Political Rewind guest hosted by Rickey Bevington, we break down the compromise between Republicans and Democrats to end the government shutdown, and the anger that many Democrats are expressing towards Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer for his negotiations with Mitch McConnell.  We’re also talking about how the shutdown has impacted Georgia and how things could be worse for the state if another shutdown happens in three weeks.  Also, Atlanta has made the shortlist for Amazon’s second headquarters, but what will

(AP Photo/John Bazemore)

On this edition of Political Rewind, 6th District Congresswoman Karen Handel is tapped to help other GOP candidates for congress on how to run for office in the anti-Trump atmosphere, but the AJC’s Jim Galloway says Governor Nathan Deal may be the best model for Republicans on how to win. 

Christopher Bartelsk

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” we’re discussing the life and music of jazz singer Billie Holiday with actress Terry Burrell, who’s now playing her on stage, and Emory musicologist Dwight Andrews.

For years, Atlanta has worked to fix failing public schools. Charter schools have begun to appear as an alternative to many of those troubled schools. In author David Osborne’s latest book, Reinventing America’s Schools, he suggests charter school-like guidelines that all schools should follow, including Atlanta’s. We talked with him and Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Maureen Downey.

 

 

(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia Senator David Perdue puts himself front and center in one of the biggest controversies of the Trump presidency.  What does Perdue gain or lose by defending the president?  Plus, as members of Congress jockey over extending DACA and building a border wall, the deadline for passing a government spending bill hangs in the balance.  If there is a government shutdown this weekend, who will get the blame?  Then, a coalition of faith-based organizations put a controversial religious liberty bill back in play at the state capital.  What’s likely to happe

Last week, a federal judge temporarily halted the Trump administration's plan to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. It’s unclear if legislative efforts to extend the program will be successful. 

On this edition of Political Rewind, we talk with Dr. Meria Carstarphen, the Superintendent of Atlanta Public Schools.  We’ll look at how she’s rebuilding a school system rocked by a scandal that made national headlines before her arrival and we’ll ask her to weigh in on the impact that state education policies championed by Governor Deal and Trump administration proposals are having on public schools.  Plus, we’ll access the impact of the vulgar remarks President Trump allegedly made about immigrants from Haiti, El Salvador and some African countries.

Have you ever wisecracked that you’d like to escape your troubles by running off to join a circus? It was no joke for brothers George and Willie Muse at the turn of the last century. These African American brothers, born albinos to a poor sharecropper’s family, were kidnaped from the tobacco fields in rural Virginia. For decades, they were displayed as freaks in the circuses that crisscrossed America for many years.

Sean Powers / GPB

The Breakroom gang has a lot of news to cover this week. We’ll talk about Oprah’s impassioned Golden Globes speech, why more college students are finding sugar daddies, and what UGA’s big loss means for Georgia football fans. We also look at the rising popularity of cassette tapes, wonder if cash is going out of style, and ask if kids are spending too much time on smart phones. Joining us in the Breakroom are Natalie Pawelski, Charles Richardson, Sam Burnham, and Amber Scott.

For years, print publications have been struggling to stay afloat in a digital world. Recently, that uphill battle hit Atlanta’s alternative magazines. Creative Loafing announced last month it would cut its staff, after transitioning from weekly to monthly earlier in the year. We talk about the role of alternative magazines with Keith Herndon, Professor of Journalism at the University of Georgia. He is also author of the book, ‘The Decline of the Daily Newspaper.’

(AP Photo/David Goldman)

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, we are at the Georgia State Capitol for Governor Nathan Deal’s final State of the State address.  What are his plans for restoring economic vitality to rural Georgia communities?  What about expanded transit in metro Atlanta?  How will he cap his progressive reforms in the criminal justice system?  And, what does he see as his legacy accomplishments?  Lieutenant Governor Casey Cagle, House Speaker David Ralston and others stop by to react to the speech.

Panelists:

(AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, President Trump visits Atlanta for the college football national championship game.  What plans do protestors have to make their voices heard?  Also, the Georgia Legislature is back in session.  Will lawmakers steer clear of hot button issues as they prepare to face elections later this year?  And, there are new plans to rebrand the state’s most prominent tribute to the Confederacy.

Panelists:

AJC Political Reporter Jim Galloway

Democratic Consultant Tharon Johnson

AP Photo/Tannen Maury

On this edition of Political Rewind, we’re discussing a bill set to be debated in the state legislature that would establish a hate crimes law in Georgia.  We’re one of just a handful of states without one.  Then, Attorney General Jeff Sessions opens the door for a federal crackdown on legal marijuana.  What impact could it have on our medical pot statute?  The White House is now in full battle mode against a sensational new book that alleges Trump’s closest allies think he’s not fit to be president.

Panelists:

(Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” Bill talks to astronaut Scott Kelly, who holds the American record for most consecutive days in space.

On this edition of Political Rewind, we ring in the new year with a look at the major events we’ll be following through 2018.  Georgians will elect a new governor while Republicans are banking on the fact that the state remains deeply red and will continue GOP dominance under the “Gold Dome”.  Democrats say they’ll put that presumption to a serious test. Oh, and President Trump starts the new year with yet another tweet storm.

Panelists:

GaPundit.com Owner and Editor Todd Rehm

Former Pollster Beth Shapiro

On this special edition of Political Rewind, we look back at the year in politics. From new leadership in Atlanta to the fight for a new governor of Georgia and an expensive fight for a congressional seat. There was also President Trump, tax reform, health care reform, the Mueller Russia investigation, the resignation of one Georgian from the president’s cabinet and the firing of another, plus the #MeToo movement that sent tremors through Washington. All were big stories in 2017, but which ranked as the biggest according to our panel?

Carolyn Kaster/ASSOCIATED PRESS

With New Year's right around the corner, we're re-airing our conversation with Ambassador Andrew Young in the spirit of self-reinvention. We hope that Young, a man who has been working on himself for his entire life, will inspire you as you write your New Year's resolutions. 

On this special edition of Political Rewind, Khizr Khan joins us. When Khan pulled a copy of the U.S. Constitution out of his pocket and offered it to Donald Trump at last year’s Democratic Convention, he found himself thrust overnight in the national spotlight.

If you want to see theater in one of its most nerve-racking forms, look no further than actor Colin Mochrie. The comedian is best known for his role on the short-form improvisational comedy show "Whose Line Is It Anyway?" Mochrie has a richly deserved reputation for his skill at improvisation. We talked with him about his craft.

The Georgia film industry is big business - $9.5 billion big in 2017. We spent the hour meeting the people who work on film and television projects that are produced in the state

 

“My Cousin Vinny” premiered 25 years ago to critical and popular acclaim. Filmed mostly in Monticello, Georgia, it tells the story of an inexperienced New York attorney who takes on the biggest case of his career --- a murder trial. We looked back on the film’s legacy with its director, Jonathan Lynn.

(AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgians will continue to pay for an expansion of the Plant Vogtle nuclear power facility, thanks to a ruling by the Public Service Commission. Our panel will weigh in on how much we’ll pay and look at why the decision has sparked controversy. Plus, state legislators are considering a new tax on phones, television subscriptions and streaming services like Netflix. We’ll discuss the reasons. And, the U.S. Ambassador to the U.N.

Host Bill Nigut reads one of the most beloved of all holiday stories: Truman Capote’s “A Christmas Memory.” In this heart-warming memoir, Capote recounts the Christmases he spent with an elderly, distant cousin when he was a young boy living in Monroeville, Alabama.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

Georgia Power’s expansion of nuclear power at Plant Vogtle is still alive following a unanimous vote by the state’s Public Service Commission.

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