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Former first lady Michelle Obama makes a surprise visit to Spelman College in Atlanta on Saturday, May 11.
Robert Jimison / GPB

Former first lady Michelle Obama made a surprise visit to Spelman College ahead of a book tour event in Atlanta for her autobiography, "Becoming."

Laura Coleman/GPB Augusta

In this week’s Medical Minute, Dr. Joseph Hobbs, chairman of the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, discusses how a synthetic peptide, can halt destructive inflammation in the kidneys and help them better recover. 


Flux Projects

On Second Thought regularly shares news stories: pictures of kids, babies and food via text and social media. Flux Projects executive director Anne Archer Dennington stopped by the studio and shared a song. 

Flux Projects will bring performance group Choir! Choir! Choir! to Atlanta on Mother's Day to lead  participants in a popular '90s song. The group will sing TLC's "Waterfalls" from a mother's point of view. 


  • Some GA Republicans Break With Party To Approve Disaster Relief
  • Governor Kemp Signs 2020 Budget, Mandates Teacher Pay Raises
  • Atlanta Beltline Makes Largest Commitment Ever To Affordable Housing


Hope Givers Festival / Twitter

The U.S. Mental Health Care System is a multi-billion dollar industry, yet countless people living with or affected by mental illness fall through the cracks.

Georgia ranks 47th out of 50 for access to mental health care, resources and insurance coverage making it even tougher to live with disorders most data and experts find to be under-researched, undertreated and over-stigmatized.

Grant Blankenship / GPB News

The House has passed a $19 billion disaster aid bill that would deliver long-sought relief to farmers, victims of hurricanes and floods, and rebuild southern military bases. Democrats controlling the chamber are trying to dislodge the legislation from a Senate logjam over aid to hurricane-slammed Puerto Rico.

Nasser Nasser / AP

Healthcare costs make up almost a fifth of spending in the U.S. economy, and they’re the number one cause of personal bankruptcies. It’s well known that doctor’s visits and medical procedures are expensive, but it turns out they can be especially pricey in some parts of Georgia. 


Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Gov. Brian Kemp has signed the record-breaking $27.5 billion budget for fiscal year 2020, which begins July 1.

This year's budget includes a 2% pay raise for state employees and a $3,000 raise for teachers and other certified school employees, and fully funds the state's education formula for the second year in a row. Kemp has called the raise a "down payment" on his campaign promise of $5,000 for teachers.

GPB News

Former Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams says she's still considering running for president in 2020.

Abrams answered "yes" when asked in an interview with Pod Save America airing Thursday afternoon if she was still contemplating joining the crowded Democratic presidential field.

Abrams has also been floated as a possible vice-presidential pick, though she recently downplayed the idea, telling ABC that "you don't run for second place."

Every year around Mother's Day, Michele Filgate braces herself for the affectionate photos and social media tributes to mothers. It's not for lack of wanting to see women celebrated, but the painful awareness of her own strained relationship with her mother.

That void deepened when the author and literary critic published an essay entitled "What My Mother and I Don't Talk About," about serial abuse by her stepfather and her mother's denial of it.


  • Governor Kemp To Sign Budget Tomorrow
  • New Law Increases Minimum Age Of Marriage
  • New Regulations Signed Into Law For Private Beachfront Property


Growing up in Atlanta in the 1970s, Jonathan Weisman didn't think much about anti-Semitism. In fact, he didn't think much about being Jewish until 2016. That's when, as deputy editor of the Washington Bureau of The New York Times, he posted a quote from an op-ed about facism on Twitter. That tweet unleashed a torrent of anti-Semitic images, threats and other forms of cyber-stalking that shattered his complacency.


Ranking Member Rep. Doug Collins accompanied by Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler speaks as Attorney General William Barr does not appear before a House Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington.
Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

Today on Political Rewind, Georgians are making national political news this week.


Gnats don’t read maps, but the bugs do seem hesitant to cross an unseen, geographic boundary in Georgia. Learn about the disparities north and south of the "gnat line" from Tales from the Gnat Line author and longtime state lawmaker Larry Walker.


Courtesy of Happy Fish Productions

Professional wrestling boomed when cable hit in the late '70s and early '80s. Shows like Georgia Championship Wrestling and Mid-South Wrestling planted dreams of glory in the heads and hearts of muscular southern boys. Ted "The Million Dollar Man" DiBiase, Jimmy "Superfly" Snuka and Billy "Superstar" Graham all had important matches in Georgia. They are among dozens of stars who took hits outside the ring. 

The documentary film 350 Days looks into the hard knock lives of professional wrestlers in what's known as the golden age of wrestling.


Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The number of mothers who die from pregnancy-related complications has not declined, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

That means women in Georgia — especially in rural parts of the state where access to maternity care is limited or nonexistent —  are more likely to die from pregnancy-related complications than in countries much poorer than the United States.

But, the CDC said Tuesday in its Vital Signs report, that most of these deaths are preventable.

Courtesy Daniel Parvis

Most Americans say they know at least some of their neighbors, but admit they tend to interact less with neighbors who don't belong to the same class, race or political party, according to the Pew Research Center. So, when Tania del Valle and her husband Pablo move into the fixer-upper next door to Frank and Virginia Butley's historic home, a saga of microaggressions ensues.

Those racial, generational and economic tensions play out in Native Gardens, on stage this month at Lawrenceville's Aurora Theatre. Costars Fedra Ramirez-Olivares and Carolyn Cook, who portray Tania del Valle and Virginia Butley, respectively, joined On Second Thought in studio to share more about their production and the play's real-life parallels in Gwinnett County. 


Bob Andres / The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

On this edition of Political Rewind, Gov. Kemp makes good on a campaign promise. He has signed H.B. 481 into law. The measure all but outlaws abortion in Georgia.

 


Even if you can't put your finger on it, Takénobu's music might sound familiar to you. That's because the "cinematic folk" from the classically trained Atlanta locals are frequently used on NPR shows and in video or film, including the new documentary 42 Grams.

Takénobu takes its name from cellist Nick Ogawa, who performs with his violinist (and fiancée) Kathryn Koch. The two have a new album called Conclusion coming out on May 24, and an upcoming tour with Kishi Bashi. But before they gear up for a big 2019, they joined On Second Thought to share their story.


Credit: Gregory Miller

Even if you can't put your finger on it, Takénobu's music might sound familiar to you. That's because the "cinematic folk" from the classically trained Atlanta locals is frequently used on NPR shows and in video or film, including the new documentary 42 Grams.

 

Bob Andres / The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Editor's note: This story was updated at 1:47 p.m. Tuesday to include information from HB 481 signing protests

Starting Jan. 1, Georgia will have one of the strictest abortion laws in the country, if it survives legal challenges from abortion rights advocates and civil rights groups.

Republican Gov. Brian Kemp signed HB 481, the Living Infants Fairness and Equality (LIFE) Act Tuesday morning.

Courtesy Alex Williamson / Teaching Tolerance

Grade school teachers reported more than 3,000 hate incidents in schools during the fall 2018 semester, a new survey from the Southern Poverty Law Center's Teaching Tolerance program has found. Those incidents, however, often went undisciplined by school leaders – and less than a third made it into the news.

Teaching Tolerance Director Maureen Costello joined On Second Thought on the line from Montgomery, Alabama, to share more of the report's findings. 


  • Kemp To Sign Abortion Bill
  • Georgians Paid More In Taxes This Year
  • Atlanta Activists Continue To Push To Close City Jail


Hate incidents are on the rise in American schools, according to a new report from the Teaching Tolerance project at the Southern Poverty Law Center. Teaching Tolerance Director Maureen Costello joined On Second Thought on the line from Montgomery, Alabama, to discuss the report's findings.


Courtesy of Ten Speed Press

Ernest Matthew Mickler's White Trash Cooking was released in 1986 to mixed reviews. Some of the recipes in the cookbook include "Uncle Willie's Swamp Cabbage Stew," "Rabbit Pie" and "Broiled Squirrel." Critics wondered if the book was for shock value or if it was just another elitist dig at poor southerners.  

Michael Adno's profile of Mickler portrays a man who took pride in his disappearing southern heritage and in the food served by his Florida relatives and neighbors —the same people he felt rejected by as a gay man.


GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, Gov. Kemp’s office has announced plans to sign H.B. 481 the controversial “Heartbeat Bill” on Tuesday. Our panel discusses what to expect following the event.


Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Gov. Brian Kemp will be signing a controversial measure Tuesday that effectively bans abortions after six weeks of pregnancy and gives certain personhood rights to a fetus. 

HB 481 will be signed at 10 a.m. in the governor's ceremonial office at the Capitol.

GPB

Michael Owens, past chairman of the Cobb County Democrats and cyber security expert, announced his bid for U.S. House of Representatives Monday morning. Owens will be challenging incumbent Democratic Rep. David Scott. 

In his announcement, Owens said, "The next member of Congress for Georgia's 13th must be a progressive leader that will advocate for bold policies that will better the lives every American." 

Laura Coleman/GPB Augusta

In this week’s Medical Minute, Dr. Joseph Hobbs, chairman of the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, discusses how, at least in men, activating a specific gene can turn around classic symptoms of depression.  


  • Georgia Approves First Community Bank In More Than A Decade
  • Gnats Are Being Found North Of 'Gnat Line'
  • Remains Of A Korean War Veteran Return Home To Georgia


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