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Some students in Georgia will receive debt relief for private loans they took out to attend a failed for-profit school.

According to a press release from Attorney General Chris Carr's office, 471 former ITT Tech students in Georgia will receive $4,171,314.43 in debt relief for loans obtained to attend the school. 

 


GPB Evening Headlines For June 20, 2019

Jun 20, 2019

  • Some Georgia Students To Recieve Debt Relief In ITT Settlement
  • World Refugee Day Honors Those Displaced, Including People Resettled In Georgia 
  • Parole Board Denies Clemency To Man On Death Row

atlantaga.gov

  • Clemency Denied For Condemned Inmate
  • Georgia Driver's Licenses Get Security Upgrade
  • Hawks Have Two 1st Round Picks In Tonight's NBA Draft

Tom E. Puskar / AP

The state health department on Thursday confirmed the seventh case of measles in Georgia this year.

An unvaccinated metro Atlanta resident was diagnosed with measles after traveling overseas, Department of Public Health spokeswoman Nancy Nydam said.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

June 20 marks World Refugee Day. The United Nations defines refugees as people forced to flee their native countries "because of persecution, war or violence." On Second Thought covered a variety of aspects of the refugee experience in Georgia. 


undated mugshot of Marion Wilson Jr.
Georgia Department of Corrections

Georgia's parole board has denied clemency to a man set to be executed Thursday at the state prison in Jackson.


  • Contractor Charged With Taking Kickbacks On Army Projects
  • Georgia's Presidential Primary Election Date Is March 24, 2020
  • Savannah Considers First Zoning Code Overhaul In Half A Century


She took her columns for Teen Vogue seriously, and now she’s taking her skills to NPR.  On Second Thought met Isabella Sarmiento Gomez,  a new NPR Kroc Fellow from Atlanta.

Each year hundreds of people hike the Appalachian Trail, which starts right here in Georgia. This year, two married writers are doing them. We followed up with them for another audio check in along their journey.


Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger during an election commisison meeting in Macon. On Wednesday, Raffensperger annonuced Georgia will hold its presidential primary on March 24, 2020.
Stephen Fowler / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, President Donald Trump's internal polls show him behind in Georgia, Florida and other key states. His campaign rally in Orlando gave the audience a glimpse of the themes on which he will run.


atlantaga.gov

  • Juneteenth Celebrated Across The State
  • New Bank Name, "Truist" Challenged In Copyright Infringement Suit
  • Atlanta United Advances To Quarter Finals In U.S. Open Cup

Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

We have an election date: Two days after county elections officials expressed concerns about the still-to-be-decided presidential preference primary date, the secretary of state's office announced that voters will head to the polls March 24, 2020. 

That date is just before the deadline for a new voting machine vendor to fully implement a new system across the state's 159 counties.


Summer Evans

It's Juneteenth, also known as "Freedom Day"  — commemorating the ending of slavery in the United States. It was on June 19, 1865, when union soldiers arrived in Galveston, Texas, to announce slavery had been abolished. That was two years after President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation of Proclamation.

On Second Thought looked at Juneteenth traditions and history with Daina Ramey Berry. Berry is professor of history and African and African diaspora studies at the University of Texas at Austin. She's also author of four books that detail the history of slavery, including "The Price for Their Pound of Flesh."


  • New "Georgia Recovers" Billboards Shed Light On Substance Abuse
  • Former Ft. Valley State University Employee Pleads Guilty To Prostitution Charges
  • Ebenezer Baptist Church Hosts "Ending Mass Incarceration" Conference In Atlanta 


Max Pixel

Earlier in June, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported that 17,000 poor, elderly or disabled Georgians had lost their Medicaid benefits. The Georgia Department of Community Health said their accounts were terminated for not responding to renewal notices. Now, the AJC reports state officials have revealed the full number of people slated to lose Medicaid is closer to 30,000.

Some people read the local paper for news and sports. Others head straight to the columns. That's where you'll find Dick Yarbrough, who has never run short of opinions. The iconic opinion-wielder enters about 600,000 homes across Georgia and addresses more than one million readers each week.

The Georgia Press Association named Yarbrough's column "most humorous" several times — although some politicians don't appreciate his sense of humor at all. Yarbrough spoke with On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott about his career writing columns for more than 20 years.

 


Album Cover Photo By Art Rosenbaum

"Corridos" are a traditional form of storytelling through song, which became widely popular during the Mexican Revolution. They often tell stories of history, oppression, the common human experience and cultural heroes. These songs chronicle life (and sometimes death) in an easily shared and consumed format.

A new album by Athens-based musician and activist Beto Cacao carries on the tradition of this musical form. It's called Undocorridos: Songs of the Stories and Struggles of the Undocumented in the USA


LaRaven Taylor/GPB

Some people read the local paper for news and sports. Others head straight to the columns. That's where you'll find Dick Yarbrough, who has never run short of opinions. The iconic opinion-wielder enters about 600,000 homes across Georgia and addresses more than one million readers each week.

The Georgia Press Association named Yarbrough's column "most humorous" several times — although some politicians don't appreciate his sense of humor at all. Yarbrough spoke with On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott about his career writing columns for more than 20 years.


President Donald Trump gives his State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress, at the Capitol in Washington, as Vice President Mike Pence, left, and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi look on. In Trump's estimation, the good times began to roll for t
Doug Mills / The New York Times via AP

On this edition of Political Rewind, Democratic incumbents in Georgia's congressional delegation who are also running for seats in 2020 show no unanimity on the impeachment of President Donald Trump.


Summer Meals Are Heating Up For Hungry Kids In Macon

Jun 18, 2019
Marianna Bacallao / GPB

Most kids who rely on free or reduced-price lunch during the school year lose that steady source of food when the summer begins.

To help compensate for lost meals, counties across the state participate in the United States Department of Agriculture’s Summer Food Service Program. Schools, parks and other USDA-designated meal sites provide free breakfast and lunch to students in need.


atlantaga.gov

  • Georgia Presidential Primary Date In Question
  • State Board Of Pardons And Paroles To Hold Clemency Hearing
  • Braves Win Again

cybercenter.georgia.gov

Augusta’s economy is booming bigtime.  The metro area’s GDP has increased more than $1.5 billion since 2015.  It’s outpacing national growth and on track to eclipse the statewide rate.

That good news follows decades of struggle.  Sea Stachura has been reporting on the turnaround for GPB.  She told On Second Thought the growth is tied to the city’s emerging cyber security field.  


  • Georgia Holds Off On Setting Presidential Primary Date 
  • Gwinnett Co. Commissioner Sues County After Receiving Public Reprimand From Colleagues
  • Georgia On Track For Record-Breaking Sea Turtle Nesting Season


Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Georgia could be one of the last states to set its date for the 2020 presidential preference primary, which is one of the first elections to be held on a soon-to-be-selected new voting system. 

In years past, Georgia has joined a number of states in holding the presidential primary on the first Tuesday in March known as "Super Tuesday," or what then-Secretary of State Brian Kemp dubbed the "SEC primary" in 2016.

But this year elections officials are holding off on a date until the dust has settled on the procurement process to replace Georgia's 27,000 outdated direct-recording electronic voting machines. 


Marchers unfurl a huge rainbow flag as they prepare to march in the Equality March for Unity and Pride in Washington, Sunday, June 11, 2017.
Carolyn Kaster / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, as Pride Month continues across the country, we will take a look at the progress made by the LGBTQ Community in the decades long effort to gain equal protections and fair treatment in Georgia and across the nation. 


Organizers and city leaders are still puzzling out why a job fair at the Anderson Conference Center in Macon recently saw an unexpectedly large turnout.

More than 3,500 job hunters stood in a line a mile long, and some continued to wait hours after the fair technically closed.  This all happened amidst reports of low unemployment rates for the county and state.

 


atlantaga.gov

  • Atlanta City Council To Vote On 2020 Budget
  • Haddish Cancels Atlanta Appearance Due To Heartbeat Law
  • Braves Demolish Philadelphia Phillies

LaRaven Taylor / GPB

"Recreational Genetics" are a thing. Apparently, an estimated 26 million people worldwide have dug into their ancestry with the help of at-home DNA kits such as Ancestry or 23andMe. But finding your family story requires more than learning ethnic percentages from a DNA swab. 

That's where genealogist Kenyatta Berry comes in. She's a lawyer and co-host of PBS' Genealogy Roadshow. Berry visited On Second Thought to talk about her new book, The Family Tree Toolkit: A Comprehensive Guide to Uncovering Your Ancestry and Researching Genealogy.


Marianna Bacallao

Organizers and city leaders are still puzzling out why a job fair at the Anderson Conference Center in Macon recently saw an unexpectedly large turnout.

More than 3,500 job hunters stood in a line a mile long, and some continued to wait hours after the fair technically closed.  This all happened amidst reports of low unemployment rates for the county and state.


Georgia Council on Substance Abuse

Billboards, telling stories of recovery from addiction, are now live across the state. The campaign was announced earlier this month by Georgia Recovers.

The money for the billboard campaign comes from Congress’s response to the opioid crisis, and the funds were distributed by the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities, Georgia Council on Substance Abuse Executive Director Neil Campbell said.

In this week’s Medical Minute, Dr. Joseph Hobbs, chairman of the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, discusses a reason why people with obesity and diabetes have higher rates of cognitive decline as they age. 

The Medical Minute airs at 8:18 a.m., 1:20 p.m. and 5:18 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday on the 17 GPB radio stations across Georgia. For more Medical Minute episodes, visit the GPB Augusta SoundCloud page.

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