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ORIGINALLY AIRED FEB. 4, 2019:

 

It's been 64 years since 14-year-old Emmett Till was murdered in Mississippi.

 

Till was kidnapped by a gang of white men and killed after he whistled at a white woman in a grocery store.

 

The two men behind the crime were eventually acquitted by an all-white jury.

 

But the pictures of Emmett Till’s body during his open-casket funeral sparked outrage across the country and fueled the civil rights movement in the 1960s.

 


Ross Terrell / GPB News

An emergency response team was dispatched Tuesday to the Sterigenics plant in Cobb County to investigate reports of a toxic gas leak that forced employees to evacuate the facility last month.

 

The gas leak occurred in the early morning of July 31, just hours after a community meeting was held to address emissions concerns in Smyrna, according to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

John Minchillo / AP

The Georgia Department of Public Health released numbers last week showing the number of prescriptions for opioids written in the state has fallen. But a recent study shows the state has one of the lowest rates of painkiller misuse in the country at 3.7%.

Ross Terrell / GPB News

About 6,000 AT&T workers across Georgia moved into day five of their strike Tuesday. It’s a part of a larger strike across the southeast that involves more than 20,000 employees across nine states: Alabama, Florida, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. 


  • Georgia Workers Take Part In Regional AT&T Strike
  • Amico Enters Race For U.S. Senate
  • Gov. Kemp Says Facilities Emitting Toxic Gas Will Not Close


Former candidate for Lieutenant Governor, Sarah Riggs Amico, has formally announced her run for the U.S. Senate seat currently held by Sen. David Perdue
File, Stephen Fowler/GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, a new entry in the Democratic race for U.S. Senate. 

Taylor Gantt / GPB

For generations, Forsyth County, which is north of Atlanta, was a predominantly white area that actively sought to keep other races away. 

 

One of the most infamous incidents in 1912, when over 1,000 black residents were driven out of the county after an unsolved crime was blamed on a black man named Rob Edwards, who was lynched. 

 

But, these days, Forsyth is growing more diverse.

 

 


Zoo Atlanta

All four giant pandas located at Zoo Atlanta celebrate birthdays in August and September. Adult female Lun Lun turned 22 on Aug. 25, adult male Yang Yang turns 22 on Sept. 9 and their offspring, twin females Ya Lun and Xi Lun, turn 3 on Sept. 3. 

  • Amico Enters Senate Race
  • GA. Poultry Farmers To Benefit From USDA Tariff Relief Funding
  • Atlanta United Plays For U.S. Open Cup Championship Tonight

Court of Appeals of Georgia

A Georgia coroner says an appeals court judge who was found dead from a gunshot over the weekend killed himself.

Dougherty County Coroner Michael Fowler told a news conference that an autopsy completed Monday concluded Judge Stephen Goss died by suicide. WALB-TV reports the coroner said a gun was found beside Goss’ body but authorities found no note.

Pixabay via Pexels.com

Atlanta-based author and primatologist Frans de Waal has observed animal behavior for 40 years. He's since challenged prevailing scientific notions of animals as stimulus response machines. His new book, Mama's Last Hug: Animal Emotions, details findings on jealousy and reconciliation.


Photo by Brandon on Unsplash

A Georgia health official says at least 17 people who were exposed to a rabid raccoon have started treatment.

News outlets report North Central Health District spokesman Michael Hokanson gave an update Monday to the "Raccoon or Kitten" event that took place Aug. 3 in Macon.

Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Less than a year after losing the race to lead the Georgia State Senate, Democrat Sarah Riggs Amico has announced her campaign for the U.S. Senate.

Amico, who runs car-hauling business Jack Cooper Holdings, said in a campaign launch video that “these are times that test our faith,” and shared her vision to help “build a government as good as the people of Georgia” if elected.

“We need leaders who will renew our faith in America’s loftiest ideals,” she said.  


  • Environmental Advocates React To Federal Ruling Blocking Obama-Era Water Rule
  • Public Comment Period To End On State Oversight of Toxic Coal Ash Ponds 
  • Opioid-Related Deaths Fall In Georgia


Grant Blankenship / GPB

When coal-fired power plants burn coal, what’s left over is a toxic ash mixed with water that gets stored in ash ponds. They look pretty much like you’d imagine – huge, contained pools of slurry and particulates – and environmentalists worry about their potential effects on the ecosystem and drinking water.

Georgia Power is on track to quit adding to its ash ponds by sometime next year.  That’s a mandate in the Integrated Resources Plan the Georgia Public Service Commission approved this summer. 


Chickens at a chicken house in Cumming, Ga., April 24, 2006.
(AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Today on Political Rewind, Georgia’s poultry producers may soon receive millions of dollars of government relief to compensate for their losses as a result of President Donald Trump’s trade war with China. As that war continues, how is it affecting the president’s standing among Georgia farmers? Our panel weighs in.

 


Tom Hines

Ocean Vuong dazzled the literary world with his first collection of poetry. His debut novel, On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous, was one of the most anticipated of the year.

Written in the form of a letter from a character named Little Dog to his illiterate mother, the novel charts Little Dog’s fraught path from childhood into adulthood and reckons with violence, loss and belonging. Severely bullied by his classmates and physically abused by his mother, whose trauma from life in Vietnam still weighs heavily on the family, Little Dog finds temporary refuge in drugs, a teenaged love affair and in the dyamic power of language itself.


Wikimedia Commons

  • Judge Blocks Clean Water Act Rules
  • Rome Proposes Homeless Regulations
  • McIlroy Takes $15m Tour Championship FedEx Cup

Seth Perlman / AP

A federal judge last week blocked an Obama-era rule governing what bodies of water are subject to the Clean Water Act.

 

The Obama administration rule said the Clean Water Act applies to streams and ponds that are sometimes dry and other bodies of water far upstream from navigable waterways. Farmers, developers and other landowners called that federal overreach. Ten states including Georgia challenged the rule.

Leighton Rowell / GPB

Domestic violence and sexual assault are leading causes of injuries for young women and girls over the age of 15 in Georgia, according to the state's Department of Public Health. In fact, reports indicate that 30% of Georgia women in that age group will be abused at least once by their partners in their lifetimes.

To understand why, we spoke with Michelle White, who is a child and youth project manager for the Georgia Coalition Against Domestic Violence. She explained how to identify and prevent teen dating violence as well as why teens are less likely to report it. And White also described the characteristics of healthy relationships.


Georgia Power is on track to close its coal ash ponds by sometime next year, and who regulates that process could change soon.  The federal EPA wants to give that oversight to the states. The public has until Aug. 27 to weigh in on the possible transition. Grant Blankenship visits On Second Thought to discuss what it could mean for the environment.


The Georgia Court of Appeals located in the State Judicial Building in Atlanta.
Supreme Court of Georgia

An appeals judge in Georgia was found Saturday shot dead behind his Albany home, but officials do not believe it was a homicide.

Albany police were dispatched to the residence and found Judge Stephen Goss, 60, in a wooded area dead from a gunshot wound, news outlets reported. 

Atlanta Braves catcher Francisco Cervelli gestures toward the dugout during the first inning of the team's baseball game against the New York Mets, Saturday, Aug. 24, 2019, in New York.
Mary Altaffer / AP Photo

Just about every newcomer to the Atlanta Braves has made an immediate impact lately. 

 

 

  • Georgia Congresswoman Speaks Out Against Lawsuit Seeking To Overturn ACA
  • Georgia Claims Victory In Battle Against Obama-Era Water Regulation Rule
  • Carters Plan Their Annual Habitat For Humanity Volunteer Trip


In this photo provided by U.S.People who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States sit in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas, Sunday, June 17, 2018.
(U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Rio Grande Valley Sector via AP)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Trump administration issues new rules designed to further reduce the number of immigrants seeking new lives in the United States.

Deen Van Meer

Georgia has had its own share of musical superstars like Ray Charles, Ludacris and Childish Gambino. The Peach State is also a hot-bed for actors — aided and abetted by a booming TV and film industry. 

Those two artforms come toghether in musical theater. Georgia isn't traditionally known for seeding musicals, but fall is a fresh season for theatrical productions. Theatre critic and writer Kelundra Smith says we can expect some musical numbers this fall.


  • East Point Develops City Agriculture Plan
  • Georgia Citizen-Led Pollinator Census This Weekend
  • Metro Atlanta CEO Survives California Plane Crash

Arantza Peña Popo

Next to breathing, Googling must be among the most commonly performed tasks in contemporary life. Everyone is familiar with the homepage, and that little illustration around the search bar — that is a “Google Doodle.”


COURTESY OF HUB CITY PRESS

In the late 19th Century, Lulu Hurst transfixed audiences as the "Georgia Wonder." An electrical storm supposedly gave the teenager supernatural powers to catapult grown men from chairs. She performed on stages from Cedartown, Georgia, to the East Coast and Midwest.

Hurst appeared in front of members of congress and government scientists. She was tested by Alexander Graham Bell, the faculty at Mercer University and the Medical College of Georgia — all baffled by mysterious force of the "electric maid."


She was a kind of real-life superhero before the days of cosplay and Dragon Con. Lulu Hurst called herself the “Georgia Wonder” in the late 19th century, saying an electrical storm had given her supernatural powers. Atlanta author Jessica Handler uses Hurst’s life for the basis of her novel, The Magnetic Girl. Unravel the tales of fact and fiction ahead of Handler’s appearance at the AJC Decatur Book Festival.

Beyoncé, Cher, Elvis…and Googoosh. The Iranian superstar’s name carries as much weight in some parts of the world as those other legends do in the U.S. Ahead of the singer-songwriter’s performance at Cobb Energy Performing Arts Center, learn about her life and career.


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