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Georgia Peach Could Break World Record

Jul 18, 2018
Pearson Farm

A Georgia peach that weighed in at 1.8 pounds might be a contender for the title of the world’s heaviest peach.

Fittingly, the peach was grown in Georgia’s own Peach County, at Pearson Farm.


Political Rewind: Deal Picks His Candidate

Jul 16, 2018
(AP Photo/David Goldman)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Governor Deal picks a candidate to support in the GOP race to replace him.  We’ll discuss why he made the decision he did. 


WSB-TV

On this edition of Political Rewind, Casey Cagle and Brian Kemp trade sharp accusations of malfeasance in office, but reveal few differences in policy positions in a statewide televised debate. 


DeKalb County Schools

DeKalb County is looking to fill nearly 300 teaching positions ahead of the first day of school on Aug. 6 — but recruiting teachers is also an issue beyond the Atlanta area.


Georgia Power

Georgia Power customers will receive another $25 credit on their July power bill, the utility said in a news release.

This is the second of three credits planned under the Vogtle nuclear plant construction.

The Georgia Public Service Commission approved a total of $188 million in credits as part of its order to continue construction of Vogtle 3 and 4 at the Augusta plant. Units 1 and 2 have been in operation since 1987 and 1989.

(AP PHOTO/TODD KIRKLAND, FILE)

The National Rifle Association endorsed Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle days before the July 24 GOP runoff against Secretary of State Brian Kemp.  This comes as Kemp tried to paint Cagle as weak on gun issues.


(AP PHOTO/TODD KIRKLAND, FILE)

The National Rifle Association endorsed Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle, days before the July 24 GOP runoff against Secretary of State Brian Kemp.  This comes as Kemp tried to paint Cagle as weak on gun issues.

 

STUART ISETT / FORTUNE

July fifth 2018 marks the fourth anniversary of  "Two Way Street." To celebrate that milestone, we're revisiting one of our favorite conversations: an interview with Diana Nyad, the strong-willed swimmer who was the first to swim from Cuba to Florida without a protective shark cage. 

She completed the feat, which many thought was impossible, at the remarkable age of 66. 


Grant Blankenship / GPB

The Macon-Bibb County Commission amended their just passed budget to restore funding to local libraries and other public services Tuesday night. 

The first budget that passed last week just under the wire of the new fiscal year had zeroed out library funding, money for public transit as well as for the local health department,  museums and other "external" services. A hue and cry ensued. 


Joe Cook

Several hundred paddlers spent seven days and nights paddling down a Georgia river in hopes of raising awareness to the importance of maintaining river health. 

The last day of Paddle Georgia 2018 started in Juliette and ended at Amerson Park in Macon. The 11-mile stretch was a final ode to the carefree, adventurous trek down the rivers where paddlers of all ages took to the water to kayak, canoe and surf the rapids for the weeklong event.


(AP Photo/David Goldman)

What is there was a primary runoff election and no one voted?  Early voting for the July 24th election starts today, but candidates vying for a spot in the general election worry voters won’t show up to cast ballots. 

(AP Photos, John Amis and Todd Kirkland, File)

Early voting in the Republican runoff for governor starts Monday and a new poll shows Casey Cagle and Brian Kemp neck and neck among GOP voters.   


Grant Blankenship / GPB

An unresolved budget fight in Macon-Bibb County means that at least in the short term, local libraries will close.

The Macon-Bibb County Commission was faced with a dilemma this week when trying to find a way to address a projected budget shortfall of about $14 million dollars.


GPB News

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” Tom Johnson shares stories about his life and career in journalism.

We’re revisiting this conversation — and other favorites — as part of our “Two Way Street” anniversary celebration. To kick off our fifth year, we’re listening again to the shows that we can’t let go: the conversations that challenged us, surprised us and have stuck with us all these years. This show originally aired on January 14, 2017.


Mercer University Gets N.I.H. Grant, New Designation

Jun 27, 2018
Kyle Sears

The Mercer University School of Medicine’s Center for Rural Health and Health Disparities was recognized Tuesday by the National Institute of Health as a Center of Excellence.

The only other rural-health focused Center of Excellence is in Montana.

The designation comes with a $700,000 award.

Mercer’s Dr. Jacob Warren said that award will help the center launch a telemedicine program for people with diabetes or hypertension for people who don’t have easy access to a doctor.

(AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser, File)

From GPB News, this is Political Rewind.  Today, a long-awaited decision from the United States Supreme Court in Florida’s fight with Georgia over water rights from the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers.  We’ll discuss what happens next in the fight. 


HDS Community Garden / Flickr

In one way or another, access to green space — or lack thereof — affects all 10 million Georgians. Around the state, communities are looking for ways to help everyone get outside and lead healthier lives. In Macon, there’s Georgia’s first urban agrihood. In Savannah, there’s a campaign underway to make bicycles more accessible and safe roadways more available. And in Athens, a network of community gardens and farmers markets helps educate and empower everyone from school children to seniors.

 


(AP Photo/John Amis)

On this edition of Political Rewind, we’re one month away from the runoff between Casey Cagle and Brian Kemp to decide the Republican nominee for governor.  What is Casey Cagle saying on the campaign trail to connect himself to the most popular Republican in the state?


(AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

On this edition of Political Rewind, President Donald Trump may have signed an order keeping immigrant families arrested at the border together, but it’s his comments this morning about pending immigration legislation that some say just threw GOP members of Congress under the bus. 


AP Photo

Johnny Mercer grew up in Savannah and went on to write some of the most popular love songs of the 20th century. You may not know his name, but you certainly know his music, which includes "Something’s Gotta Give," "Moon River," and "Autumn Leaves." Between 1929 and 1976, Mercer wrote the lyrics—and in some cases the music too—to some 1,400 songs.

We explore the life and music of Johnny Mercer with Georgia State University archivist Kevin Fleming. Georgia State is the repository for Johnny Mercer’s papers as well as a vast collection of other materials related to his life and career.


(AP Photo/Mike Stewart)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Governor Deal announces a first step to build new transit in metro Atlanta, a huge project along Georgia 400.  Is the state on track to tackle the region’s traffic headaches?


Immigration Showdown In Washington

Jun 18, 2018
(U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Rio Grande Valley Sector via AP)

On this edition of Political Rewind, immigration takes center stage in Washington this week.  Outrage over the Department of Justice policy of separating children from parents at the border is growing and it’s spreading across partisan lines. 


Today: Georgia's U.S. Senators go their separate ways over President Trump's tariffs. Johnny Isakson wants Congress to approve them while David Perdue says the President has the power to act on his own. We'll look at that split, and at Perdue's apparent unwavering loyalty to the Trump agenda. 


Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, GA

Savannah businessman Charles Lamar on Nov. 28, 1858, became the first person in 40 years to land a slave ship on American soil.

That event is the subject of Jim Jordan’s new book, “The Slave-Trader’s Letter-Book: Charles Lamer, the Wanderer, and other Tales of the African Slave Trade.”

Jordan was able to reconstruct the story because he got his hands on valuable research material — Charles Lamar’s own letters, which most historians didn’t even believe existed.   


Grant Blankenship / GPB

A little trove of Georgia’s biological treasures once without homes now have them.

 

They were preserved animals, mammals and birds, that instructors and staff in the Science Department at Mercer University found while moving to their new building. Mercer biologist Craig Byron said they needed a better home than a dumpster out back.

 

 


AP Photo/John Amis

GOP gubernatorial candidate under fire for a secret recording, in which he admits he used legislation to undermine a primary opponent. And why did former rival Clay Tippins record and leak the tape? Our panel has answers.


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Who is Atticus Finch really—an arch-segregationist or a champion of justice? And how do we go about answering that question when going straight to the source isn’t an option?


GPB News

Congress tacked the Family First Act onto a bill to fund the government earlier this year. The move shifts the bulk of federal foster care funding from residential care to preventative services. It takes effect in October 2019.

The goal is to keep kids at home using parent training and treatment for substance abuse and mental health. Alison Evans is the CEO of the Methodist Home in Macon where 80 foster children live. She said the act’s fine print fails to consider whether the state is equipped to provide these services.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

There’s something people think they know about the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as SNAP.

It’s the idea that people who use what we used to call food stamps spend their once monthly benefits on groceries almost immediately after they get them. When you look at averages, that’s true, and for some it can mean some lean and hungry days at the end of the month before the next round of SNAP benefits.

 

 


(AP Photo/Todd Kirkland)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Casey Cagle goes to Vegas to raise campaign cash and Brian Kemp warns voters he may be there with casinos in Georgia on his mind.  Will gambling become a major issue in the governor’s race?  Then, what’s behind Karen Handel’s rejection of President Trump’s newly imposed tariffs?  Plus, does morality in politics matter anymore?  We’ll look at Bill Clinton’s recent “tone deaf” comments on Monica Lewinsky and the #MeToo movement, Ralph Reed’s defense of President Trump’s behavior and a poll that shows more Americans than ever are just fine with pornography.


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