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David Goldman / AP

The Georgia State Patrol and Motor Carrier Compliance Division expect a record number of travelers hitting the roadways for the Fourth of July holiday.

This year, the holiday travel period is 102 hours long, beginning at 6 p.m. Wednesday and ending at 11:59 p.m. Sunday, according to the GSP. Last year, the holiday period was only 30 hours long.

Sea to Shore Alliance, taken under NOAA research permit 20556

Six endangered North Atlantic right whales died in June, four of them last week alone. This brings Georgia's official state marine mammal even closer to extinction. 

Researchers estimate that just 411 North Atlantic right whales remain. Six of them dying in one month — among them, three of breeding age — is significant. 


Experts Say Play It Safe With Fireworks

Jul 2, 2019
Marianna Bacallao / GPB

The Macon-Bibb Fire Department set off fireworks in their own parking lot, demonstrating how to safely handle, ignite and launch fireworks. 

Macon's fire department receives over 150 calls regarding firework accidents annually. Macon-Bibb Fire Chief Marvin Riggins said a majority of those accidents are eye injuries.

  • Atlanta City Council Considers City Smoking Ban
  • Former City Spokesperson Declines Plea Deal In Open Records Case
  • New State Budget Goes Into Effect Today


United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff reacts after beating United States's Venus Williams in a Women's singles match during day one of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Monday, July 1, 2019.
Tim Ireland / AP Photo

Coco Gauff surprised the world of professional tennis when she became the youngest to qualify for Wimbledon. On Monday, the 15-year-old continued her stunning run when she defeated 5-time Wimbledon champion Venus Williams at the All England Club. 

Gauff, born in Atlanta, pulled off a two set victory over Williams winning 6-4, 6-4 during the first round of the tournament. The victory makes Gauff the youngest professional tennis player to win a match at Wimbledon since fellow American Jennifer Capriati defeated Martina Navratilova at 14. 

The first day of July marks the beginning of the new fiscal year and when many laws take effect. The record-setting $27.5 billion state operating budget also kicks in, complete with money for a new voting system and pay raises for teachers, school staff and state employees. 

Stephen Fowler, GPB's political reporter, joined On Second Thought to talk about new laws taking effect.


GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, it is unclear whether the citizenship question will be added to the 2020 census after the U.S. Supreme Court sent the issue back to lower courts. The partisan implications of the question have been hotly debated, but what could be the economic impact of the decision in Georgia? 


(L) Georgia State Senate/ (R) ShaferforGeorgia.com

The state legislature may be in its post-session off season, but the political landscape in Georgia is far from quiet.

While the 2020 elections are over a year away, political parties are hard at work on strategies to reach Georgians who did not vote last year and maintain the energy of those who did.

Democratic Party of Georgia chair Sen. Nikema Williams and Georgia Republican Party chair David Shafer sat down with GPB News to discuss their plans to emerge victorious next November.

GPB political reporter Stephen Fowler sat down with On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott to share what that means for Georgia voters in the coming months.

    

David Shafer

Newly-elected Republican Party of Georgia Chairman David Shafer has a big task ahead of him in the leadup to the 2020 election.

The governor’s mansion, every statewide elected office, state legislative leadership and both U.S. Senate seats are held by Republicans.

But last fall, Democrats gained several suburban seats in the legislature and Stacey Abrams garnered more votes than any other Democrat who ran for statewide office, narrowly losing to Gov. Brian Kemp.

David Shafer sat down in the GPB studios to share his vision for the party in the coming years.


Nikema Williams / Facebook

The past year has been a whirlwind for state Sen. Nikema Williams.

 

In November, she was re-elected to her post in Atlanta-based Senate District 39.

 

But later that month, she and 14 others were arrested during a protest in the Capitol rotunda demanding that every vote be counted in the gubernatorial race between Brian Kemp and Stacey Abrams.

 

 


Elaine Thompson / AP

The first day of July marks the beginning of the new fiscal year and when many laws take effect.

We are midway through a whirlwind 2019 that has been full of political news, ranging from the nationwide conversation on abortion and reproductive rights to electoral integrity to numerous visits from the two dozen or so candidates running for president.

July 1 is when the record-setting $27.5 billion state operating budget kicks in, complete with money for a new voting system and pay raises for teachers, school staff and state employees.

David Goldman / AP

President Donald Trump on Saturday dismissed Jimmy Carter's swipe at the legitimacy of his election and said the charge was nothing more than a "Democrat talking point," while offering his own digs at the 94-year-old former commander in chief.

Glynn County commissioner and insurance agent Bob Coleman.
Glynn County

A county commissioner in coastal Georgia says he’s innocent after a grand jury indicted him on charges that he took money from clients of his insurance business.

In this week’s Medical Minute, Dr. Joseph Hobbs, chairman of the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, discusses new recommendations for monitoring blood viscosity after major medical events, like open-heart surgery. 

The Medical Minute airs at 8:18 a.m., 1:20 p.m. and 5:18 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday on the 17 GPB radio stations across Georgia. For more Medical Minute episodes, visit the GPB Augusta SoundCloud page.

  • New Lawsuit Challenges Georgia's 'Heartbeat' Abortion Bill
  • Jimmy Carter: Trump Is President Due To Russian Meddling
  • 6 Deaths Bring Right Whales Closer To Extinction


Courtesy of Abby Drue

It's been 50 years since the Stonewall Uprising began in New York City. In the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, police raided The Stonewall Inn, a popular gay bar in Greenwich Village. While accounts vary of what exactly sparked the rebellion and violent clash, what resulted was a series of protests and demonstrations — which led to the first Pride Parade in 1970.

But Stonewall, when it happened, had little effect on gay life in the South. It was another raid, a little more than a month later, that sparked outrage and galvanized Atlanta's LGBT communities. On Aug. 5, 1969, police raided a screening of Andy Warhol's Lonesome Cowboys at Ansley Mall Mini-Cinema. 


Sea to Shore Alliance, taken under NOAA research permit 20556

Six endangered North Atlantic right whales have died in June, four of them this week. This brings Georgia's state marine mammal even closer to extinction.


U.S. lawmakers are still debating the merits of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada agreement.

Mexico was the first country to ratify the proposed NAFTA replacement, and Canada is expected to follow suit.

A group of University of Georgia professors estimates that the state would lose nearly $900 million if the USMCA is adopted.

On Second Thought heard from Jeffrey Dorfman, one of the co-authors of the University of Georgia report.


Public Domain

Last week, Mexico became the first country to ratify the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, or USMCA. Canada is expected to follow suit in short course.

In The United States, however, not all American lawmakers are convinced the USMCA would be a better deal than the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA. Democrats have threatened to block it, and a few key Republicans are withholding support unless the administration makes some concessions on tariffs.


The empty courtroom is seen at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia has filed a lawsuit asking the federal court to block implementation of the state’s restrictive new abortion law.  ACLU Director Andrea Young joins us to discuss the basis for the suit.


John Amis / AP Photo

Jimmy Carter is taking a swipe at the legitimacy of Donald Trump’s presidency, saying Russian interference in the 2016 election was responsible for putting Trump in the White House.

The 94-year-old former U.S. president said Friday that he believes Russia’s meddling “if fully investigated would show that Trump didn’t actually win the election in 2016.” Carter said he believes Trump “lost the election” and became president “because the Russians interfered on his behalf.”

  • Lawsuit Filed Challenging Georgia's Heart Beat Law
  • Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms Endorses Biden For President
  • Former Equifax Executive Sentenced On Insider Trading Charges

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

A new lawsuit claims Georgia's abortion law, set to take effect Jan. 1, 2020, violates the 14th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. 

The 36-page suit, Sistersong v. Kemp, argues that the Living Infants Fairness and Equality Act "criminalizes pre-viability abortions in direct conflict with Roe v. Wade," which establishes a woman's right to an abortion until about 24 weeks into pregnancy. 


  • Ethics Cases Against Former Gubernatorial Candidate To Continue
  • Local Group Reacts To Supreme Court Ruling On Citizenship Question
  • Atlanta-Based Cox Enterprises To Sell Radio Stations


Tyler Perry Joins New BET Video Streaming Service

Jun 27, 2019
Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

Tyler Perry Studios is partnering with Viacom and BET to launch a new streaming service.

BET+ will feature on-demand video streaming for subscribers, as well as new projects from Perry.

David Goldman / AP

The flu vaccine turned out to be a big disappointment again.

The vaccine didn't work against a flu bug that popped up halfway through the past flu season, dragging down overall effectiveness to 29%, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday.

Jeremy Jacobs, Curator Emeritus National Museum of Natural History

In 2008, G. Wayne Clough became the 12th secretary of the Smithsonian. The Douglas native and Georgia Tech president emeritus was the first Southerner to hold the position.

When Clough retired from his post, he decided to write about his birthplace of South Georgia. At the same time, he dove into the Smithsonian's vast collections, searching for artifacts from the region. He shares what he found in his memoir Things New and Strange: A Southerner's Journey through the Smithsonian Collections.


GPB Evening Headlines For June 26, 2019

Jun 26, 2019

  • Chatham County Issues Second Beach Advisory In A Month
  • Tyler Perry Announces New Video Streaming Service With BET
  • Two Right Whales That Spend Part Of Year Near Georgia Found Dead

Rosser Shymanski / GPB

For the past three decades, Rosser Shymanski has played a critical role in almost every program you've watched on Georgia Public Broadcasting. Shymanski, GPB's television production manager, retires Friday after 31 years with the organization. He will say "Aloha" to his colleagues Friday with his final "Hawaiian Shirt Friday," a tradition that has become a mainstay of GPB, just like Shymanski himself.

But before Shymanski worked behind the scenes and won the hearts of his colleagues at GPB, viewers around Atlanta knew and loved him as DeAundra Peek – a character he created and portrayed for The American Music Show on People TV, a public access channel, from 1987 to 2004. The full collection is now archived at Emory University's Rose Library.


Kate Brumback / AP Photo/File

On this edition of Political Rewind, members of the Democratic U.S. House of Representatives votes in favor to send billions of dollars in humanitarian aid to detention centers holding immigrant children under conditions described as deplorable. Will the Republican held senate go along with the effort?


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