Local news

La'Raven Taylor / GPB

Monica Pearson changed the face of local news in Atlanta in 1975 when she became the first woman and African-American to anchor the evening news on WSB-TV. Pearson went on to cover seven United States presidents, six Georgia governors and a state that nearly doubled in size during her years at the anchor desk. Pearson has told other peoples’ stories for nearly four decades. Today, we got to hear hers.

 

Summer Evans / GPB

The Atlanta Jewish Times has a history as varied and complicated as the community it covers. In 1924, the Southern Israelite was founded as a family-owned paper. The name changed in the 1980s, when it was bought by a Jewish paper in Baltimore. A series of buy-outs and editorial hand-offs later, Michael Jacobs became editor — a position he's held twice in the past 13 years. 


Adam Ragusea / GPB

The face of local news in Macon, Georgia, is changing. After nearly four decades, Friday is Oby Brown's last day at The Telegraph in Macon. 

The U.S. Supreme Court issued its historic ruling Brown v. the Board of Education more than six decades ago. Linda Brown, the namesake of that landmark court case, died March 25. She was 76. 

With Brown v. Board, it became illegal to separate public school students by race. But since the landmark ruling, many schools in the South have resegregated, according to a report from the Civil Rights Project at the University of California, Los Angeles. The study also found Latino student enrollment surpassed black enrollment for the first time.

We spoke about the resegregation of southern schools with Erica Frankenberg, associate professor of education at Penn State University, Belisa Urbina, executive director of Ser Familia, and Atlanta Journal-Constitution education reporter Maureen Downey.