Local Journalism

Ted Eytan / Flickr

After a contentious interaction between CNN's Jim Acosta and President Donald Trump during a briefing, Acosta's press pass was revoked. CNN later sued the White House to restore Acosta's credentials, spurring a back and forth that ended with the White House reinstating Acosta's credentials. CNN dropped the lawsuit, but, in its place, the White House issued some broad new rules for journalists to follow during press briefings.

 

The event opened up a conversation about the press at a transformative political time. Jonathan Peters, assistant professor of journalism at UGA, joined us to discuss this unprecedented lawsuit and the changing role of journalists.

 


La'Raven Taylor / GPB

Monica Pearson changed the face of local news in Atlanta in 1975 when she became the first woman and African-American to anchor the evening news on WSB-TV. Pearson went on to cover seven United States presidents, six Georgia governors and a state that nearly doubled in size during her years at the anchor desk. Pearson has told other peoples’ stories for nearly four decades. Today, we got to hear hers.

 

Summer Evans / GPB

The Atlanta Jewish Times has a history as varied and complicated as the community it covers. In 1924, the Southern Israelite was founded as a family-owned paper. The name changed in the 1980s, when it was bought by a Jewish paper in Baltimore. A series of buy-outs and editorial hand-offs later, Michael Jacobs became editor — a position he's held twice in the past 13 years. 


The face of local news in Macon, Georgia, is changing. After nearly four decades, Friday is Oby Brown's last day at The Telegraph in Macon. Brown's departure comes amid what another outgoing editor called a "transformation" of the newspaper. Brown joined us in the studio to discuss the way local news is changing and reflect on his longtime career covering the news in middle Georgia. 

The ransomware attack that crippled Atlanta a few weeks ago isn't the only high-profile cyberattack Georgia has faced in recent years. Two years ago, a security researcher gained unauthorized access to a server used by Kennesaw State University's Center for Election Systems, which stores the data of millions of Georgia voters. At the time, the data breach wasn't illegal under Georgia law —  but a new bill awaiting Gov. Nathan Deal's signature could change that. Senate Bill 315 defines unauthorized computer access as a crime under Georgia law, which would make data breaches easier to prosecute. Some people in the tech industry, however, worry SB 315 could actually hinder their ability to do their jobs.

GOOGLE IMAGES/PBS NEWSHOUR

Last month, Georgia Broadcast Hall of Famer Judy Woodruff was named sole anchor of PBS NewsHour.

Woodruff began her journalism career as a reporter in Atlanta. Since her early days in broadcast journalism, she has covered presidential campaigns and the White House.