LGBT Rights

The U.S. Supreme Court building at dusk, Thursday, May 23, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington.
Patrick Semansky

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday in a potential landmark case that could decide whether lesbian, gay, and transgender people are protected under the federal discrimination law.

“It has the potential of ensuring and affirming that LGBT people are protected against employment discrimination under the current federal provisions of sex discrimination,” Jeff Graham, executive director of Georgia Equality, said.


Courtesy of Abby Drue

It's been 50 years since the Stonewall Uprising began in New York City. In the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, police raided The Stonewall Inn, a popular gay bar in Greenwich Village. While accounts vary of what exactly sparked the rebellion and violent clash, what resulted was a series of protests and demonstrations — which led to the first Pride Parade in 1970.

But Stonewall, when it happened, had little effect on gay life in the South. It was another raid, a little more than a month later, that sparked outrage and galvanized Atlanta's LGBT communities. On Aug. 5, 1969, police raided a screening of Andy Warhol's Lonesome Cowboys at Ansley Mall Mini-Cinema. 


Marchers unfurl a huge rainbow flag as they prepare to march in the Equality March for Unity and Pride in Washington, Sunday, June 11, 2017.
Carolyn Kaster / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, as Pride Month continues across the country, we will take a look at the progress made by the LGBTQ Community in the decades long effort to gain equal protections and fair treatment in Georgia and across the nation. 


Starland Family Practice

Finding a doctor can be especially difficult in many Georgia counties. For LGBTQ patients, it can be even worse. A first-of-its-kind clinic in Savannah is working to ease that difficulty.

As a part of LGBTQ Pride Month, On Second Thought checked in with the Starland Family Practice, a routine family medical office with a focus on LGBTQ patients, celebrating its one-year anniversary.


gay pride parade georgia lgbtq
Gee Double You / Flickr

Most American cities celebrate LGBTQ Pride in June to commemorate the Stonewall Riots. In 1969, police raided the Stonewall Inn, a bar in New York's Greenwich Village. The raid led to organizing and demonstrations by activists like Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera.

 

Atlanta and Savannah both celebrate pride in October, which is national LGBTQ history month. We spoke with Jamie Fergerson, executive director of the Atlanta Pride Committee, and Dusty Church, festival director for Savannah Pride. They discussed the past, present, and future of pride in Georgia.

 


A new oral history project reaches back over the decades for stories of black queer people in Atlanta. It highlights shifting sites of connectedness across the city.

Ashley Coleman Taylor is the principle investigator for the oral history project as well as an instructor of women's studies at Agnes Scott College. She spoke about the importance of centering black queer stories in Atlanta. We also spoke with Rev. Duncan Teague, from Abundant LUUv Unitarian Universalist Church, who worked with Taylor on the project.


Wikipedia

The Supreme Court is leaving in place a lower court ruling that a federal employment discrimination law doesn't protect a person against discrimination based on their sexual orientation.

The court on Monday declined to take up the question of whether a law that bars workplace discrimination "because of...sex" covers discrimination against someone because of their sexual orientation.

More than half of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer Americans say they have experienced violence, threats or harassment because of their sexuality or gender identity, according to new poll results being released Tuesday by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

On Second Thought For Monday, October 23, 2017

Oct 23, 2017

This year a federal court in Chicago ruled for the first time that workers can’t be fired based on sexual orientation, extending workplace protections in the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to the LGBT community. Yet, a Georgia judge ruled against a similar case. Now that case is up for appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. Jameka Evans claims Georgia Regional Hospital in Savannah fired her for being a lesbian. Earlier this month, 18 state attorneys general filed briefs in support of Evans's petition.