LGBT

Courtesy of Abby Drue

It's been 50 years since the Stonewall Uprising began in New York City. In the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, police raided The Stonewall Inn, a popular gay bar in Greenwich Village. While accounts vary of what exactly sparked the rebellion and violent clash, what resulted was a series of protests and demonstrations — which led to the first Pride Parade in 1970.

But Stonewall, when it happened, had little effect on gay life in the South. It was another raid, a little more than a month later, that sparked outrage and galvanized Atlanta's LGBT communities. On Aug. 5, 1969, police raided a screening of Andy Warhol's Lonesome Cowboys at Ansley Mall Mini-Cinema. 


U.S. lawmakers are still debating the merits of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada agreement.

Mexico was the first country to ratify the proposed NAFTA replacement, and Canada is expected to follow suit.

A group of University of Georgia professors estimates that the state would lose nearly $900 million if the USMCA is adopted.

On Second Thought heard from Jeffrey Dorfman, one of the co-authors of the University of Georgia report.


Forsyth Farmers' Market Facebook page

As June closes out and we enter into the second half of the year, Savannah offers plenty of events to engage with from panels on mental health to final celebrations of Pride Month. Marianne Ganem Poppell of Savannah Master Calendar and Mahogany Bowers of Blessings in a Bookbag have your guide. 


Stavrialena Gontzou / Unsplash.com

Celebrations continue across the country as the LGBTQ community celebrates Pride Month.

President Bill Clinton declared June as “Gay & Lesbian Pride Month” in 2000. The designation commemorated the Stonewall Riots in Lower Manhattan in June of 1969. Nine years later, President Barack Obama included bisexual and transgender people — the “B” and “T” of LGBT.

Nowadays, rainbow flags are in front yards, tourism posters, along with sponsorship banners and ad campaigns. With brands like Campbell’s Soup, Apple, and Taylor Swift feeling comfortable aligning themselves with Pride, On Second Thought sat down with Georgian members of the LGBTQ community for a conversation about the history of Pride and how corporate commodification has changed the event over time.

Marchers unfurl a huge rainbow flag as they prepare to march in the Equality March for Unity and Pride in Washington, Sunday, June 11, 2017.
Carolyn Kaster / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, as Pride Month continues across the country, we will take a look at the progress made by the LGBTQ Community in the decades long effort to gain equal protections and fair treatment in Georgia and across the nation. 


Starland Family Practice

Finding a doctor can be especially difficult in many Georgia counties. For LGBTQ patients, it can be even worse. A first-of-its-kind clinic in Savannah is working to ease that difficulty.

As a part of LGBTQ Pride Month, On Second Thought checked in with the Starland Family Practice, a routine family medical office with a focus on LGBTQ patients, celebrating its one-year anniversary.


Last week, the governing body of the United Methodist Church voted to uphold a ban on same-sex marriage and openly gay clergy.  The “Traditional Plan” won by a narrow margin at the annual meeting of the General Conference.  It defeated the “One Church Plan,” which would have allowed local congregations to make their own decisions on LGBT issues.

Dean of the Emory’s Candler School of Theology, Jan Love, was at the conference.  The school is one of thirteen Methodist seminaries in the country. During “On Second Thought,” Dean Love explored the implications of the vote here in Georgia.

 


(AP Photo/Sid Hastings)

Last week, the governing body of the United Methodist Church voted to uphold a ban on same-sex marriage and openly gay clergy.  The “Traditional Plan” won by a narrow margin at the annual meeting of the General Conference.  It defeated the “One Church Plan,” which would have allowed local congregations to make their own decisions on LGBT issues.

Jan Love, dean of Emory University's Candler School of Theology, was at the conference. The school is one of 13 Methodist seminaries in the country. During “On Second Thought,” Love explored the implications of the vote here in Georgia.


Provided by author, Samantha Allen

Author and journalist Samantha Allen wanted to go beyond the headlines in her new book, "Real Queer America: LGBT Stories from Red States."

"Often the stories we hear are just, 'Oh, this anti-LGBT law got passed' or 'This anti-LGBT law got stopped,' and we're not really seeing what's happening on the ground," said Allen.

From Provo, Utah, to Atlanta, Georgia, Allen's book explores the reasons why LGBT people stay and work for change in their communities, even when said communities might not openly accept or welcome them. Allen joined "On Second Thought" to discuss what her road trip taught her about the meaning of family and home.


Evan Agostini / Invision/Associated Press

Atlanta native Chad Darnell hits the stage as Hedwig in a new Atlanta production of "Hedwig and the Angry Inch," opening at the Pinch 'N' Ouch Theatre on Jan. 10. The musical tells the story of Hedwig Robinson, a genderfluid German rock singer who navigates love, loss and identity.

 

Darnell joined "On Second Thought" to discuss the musical's impact over 20 years after its off-Broadway debut and why he's excited to perform in front of Atlanta audiences.

 


Nafessa Williams Black Lightning CW TV
Nafessa Williams / Twitter

"Black Lightning" follows a retired superhero who gets pulled back into crime fighting to protect his family and community.

Nafessa Williams plays the daughter of the titular superhero. Her character, Anissa Pierce, is the first black lesbian superhero to appear on a network show.

Kalena Boller, host of GPB's upcoming podcast "The Credits," spoke with Williams about her groundbreaking role.

gay pride parade georgia lgbtq
Gee Double You / Flickr

Most American cities celebrate LGBTQ Pride in June to commemorate the Stonewall Riots. In 1969, police raided the Stonewall Inn, a bar in New York's Greenwich Village. The raid led to organizing and demonstrations by activists like Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera.

 

Atlanta and Savannah both celebrate pride in October, which is national LGBTQ history month. We spoke with Jamie Fergerson, executive director of the Atlanta Pride Committee, and Dusty Church, festival director for Savannah Pride. They discussed the past, present, and future of pride in Georgia.

 


Saying Goodbye To An ATL Neighborhood Favorite

Feb 1, 2018
Courtesy of Tori Allen

A restaurant can be more than a place to eat. It can also be a hub for friendship and family. That’s how many people feel about Cowtippers. This midtown Atlanta establishment has been a force in the city’s LGBT scene for the last two decades. But earlier this month, Cowtippers announced the end of an era. It plans to close February 18. GPB intern Emily Bunker visited for a lunchtime drag show-- “The Heifer Review,” and she sent back this audio postcard.

For more than 35 years, The Weather Channel has been on the frontlines of some of the biggest stories in the world. Literally. Longtime meteorologist John Coleman co-founded the Atlanta-based television network in 1982. He died earlier this month. The Weather Channel has played a major role in shaping our understanding of the environment. We talk about this with Weather Channel CEO Dave Shull.

AP Photos (David Goldman)

On this edition of "Political Rewind," did President Donald Trump admit to obstructing justice on Twitter?  Also, the controversial Republican tax reform bill passes the Senate, but it does not include a measure that would have benefited Georgia-based Delta Air Lines. The Supreme Court gets set to hear the so-called “wedding cake” case. How will the ruling impact Georgia, a state that continues to flirt with passing a religious liberty statute and one that has a large LGBT community?

The Homeless Youth Crisis In Atlanta

Nov 28, 2017
Tanya Dawn / Foter

More homeless youth live in Atlanta than any other city in the South. Across the country, more than one million young adults and teens are living on the streets. New research from Georgia State University looks at the difficulties facing homeless youth in America.

More than half of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer Americans say they have experienced violence, threats or harassment because of their sexuality or gender identity, according to new poll results being released Tuesday by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Decatur Parents Debate Over Transgender School Policy

Nov 2, 2017
Elaine Thompson / AP Photo

A debate is unfolding in City of Decatur schools about transgender rights. At a September school board meeting, a parents’ group criticized a policy protecting transgender students in Decatur. Those parents have launched a petition to rescind the policy, put in place by Superintendent David Dude last year. Vernadette Broyles is an attorney representing the parents in the petition.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions will appear before the Senate Judiciary Committee for an oversight hearing Wednesday. There's a lot to discuss.

In eight months as the nation's top federal law enforcement official, Sessions has presided over a series of Justice Department reversals — from police oversight and voting rights litigation to protections for the LGBT community.

Emily Cureton / GPB News

The annual Pride Parade drew thousands of people to Midtown Atlanta over the weekend. GPB’s Emily Cureton stopped by Piedmont Park to ask a few parade-goers what Pride events mean to them.

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis is leaving an Obama-era policy on transgender military service members largely intact, saying he needs input from an expert panel to determine the best way to implement President Trump's ban that would keep transgender people from serving in the U.S. military.

Trump barred transgender would-be recruits from signing up, but he gave Mattis discretion to decide the status of transgender people who are already serving.

Transgender members of the U.S. military would be subject to removal at Defense Secretary James Mattis' discretion — and the service would bar transgender people from enlisting, under new White House guidelines for the Pentagon. President Trump announced the ban via a tweet last month.

Rough details of the guidelines were confirmed by NPR's Tom Bowman after the White House plan for the Pentagon was reported by The Wall Street Journal.

During this month-long special legislative session, Texas Republicans are hoping to pass several red meat campaign promises, such as a ban on transgender bathroom access. But in a state where every statewide elected official is Republican and the party controls the legislature, there's one Republican trying to slow those efforts.

Texas House Speaker Joe Straus had made himself enemy number one among the state's most conservative voters. His crime? Bipartisanship.

Updated: 9:27 a.m.

President Trump's announcement that he wants to ban transgender people from serving in the military could mean a historic reversal in the Pentagon's long-term trend of lowering barriers to service.

Or it could be a speed bump on a course the Defense Department was already following.

The question in Washington following Trump's post on Twitter Wednesday morning was: Which will it be?

Almost no one other than Trump himself had any idea what he intended when he wrote this:

Updated at 4:30 p.m. ET

President Trump has announced that the government will not allow transgender people to serve in the U.S. military, a year after the Pentagon lifted its ban on transgender service members.

In a series of tweets on Wednesday morning, he wrote:

The U.S. Census Bureau has never asked Americans about sexual orientation and gender identity. Last year, though, requests for that data came from more than 75 members of Congress and multiple federal agencies.

Still, the Census Bureau concluded "there was no federal data need" to collect this information, the bureau's outgoing director, John Thompson, wrote in March.

Wikipedia

Blue Ridge is a popular getaway town in the North Georgia Mountains. It's also home to a concentration of gay couples. That’s led to a rise in the number of LGBT-owned businesses.

Landmark Decision in LGBT Workers' Rights Case

May 16, 2017

For the first time, a federal court has ruled workers can’t be fired for their sexual orientation. A court in Chicago recently extended workplace protections in the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to the LGBT community.  A similar case in Georgia is up for appeal. We talk with a lawyer for both cases, Greg Nevins, and with Andrea Young, director of the ACLU of Georgia.

Illinois LGBT-Rights Ruling Could Impact Georgia Case

Apr 5, 2017
Lambda Legal

A federal appeals court ruling this week in Illinois could affect a LGBT-rights case here in Georgia.

 

The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago ruled for the first time Tuesday that federal civil rights laws protect LGBT employees from workplace discrimination.

Adoption Law Update Lingers On Georgia Lawmakers' Last Day

Mar 30, 2017
Matt Barnett / Flickr

Changes to Georgia adoption law that proponents call long overdue await a final vote entering the General Assembly's final day on Thursday.

Conservative lawmakers added a "religious freedom" provision for private adoption agencies two weeks ago, forcing last-minute legislative maneuvers that could still send the bill to Gov. Nathan Deal's desk.

Adoption attorneys worked with the bill's sponsor, Marietta Republican Rep. Bert Reeves, for two years to craft the 100-page bill.

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