law

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The U.S. Senate plans to vote this Friday on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. Given his record, predictions are that Kavanaugh will shift the court to a conservative majority. That got us wondering about what cases are on the docket for the term that began on Monday. We spoke with Fred Smith, Jr. about cases to watch during the 2018-2019 term. Smith is an associate professor of law at Emory University School of Law.

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While Atlanta remains on Amazon’s short list for its second headquarters, not everyone likes what the company brings with it. Currently, the ACLU and Amazon employees have demanded the company to stop marketing its facial recognition technology to law enforcement. Amazon calls the technology Rekognition. It detects and analyzes not only faces, but objects and entire scenes. Ayanna Howard, chairman of the School of Interactive Computing at Georgia Tech and Ali Breland, tech/policy reporter at The Hill spoke about the biases in artificial intelligence and privacy concerns with technology.

On Second Thought For Tuesday, May 22, 2018

May 22, 2018

Some Georgia law schools want to appeal to more than their traditional law school students. In the fall, the University of Georgia begins offering a graduate degree program for non-lawyers. As schools broaden the appeal of the law, there is major concern about Georgia’s lawyer shortage, particularly in rural areas. We have seen a number of companies form that offer online legal services, but are these viable alternatives?

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A new law that will help fight the opioid crisis in Georgia will go into effect on July 1.

House Bill 249 was sent to the governor on April 7 after making it through the House with a vote of 164-9 and through the Senate with a vote of 50-0.

“The overall goal of passing the law is really to reduce prescription drug abuse and enhance patient safety,” said Dr. Steven Walsh, president of the Medical Association of Georgia.

More than 100 Atlanta teachers have joined a federal age discrimination lawsuit. The complaint alleges teachers were forced out of their jobs by an administration that was openly hostile to employees over 40. We spoke with former teacher, Cheryl Patterson. She worked for twenty-three years in the Atlanta Public School District. Georgia State University assistant professor Charlotte Alexander, also joined the conversation. She specializes in employment discrimination law.

Sharon Rowen

The fight for equality among race, gender, and sexual orientation has often ended up in the courtroom. Many of the female attorneys fighting on the front lines have been subject to gender bias. A new documentary tells their stories across several generations. It’s called "Balancing the Scales," and is based on 20 years of interviews by Atlanta filmmaker and attorney Sharon Rowen. We talked with her about the project.