Keisha Lance Bottoms

Watch Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms answer questions from the community about everything from electronic scooters to tax revenue and the city's relationship to the rest of Georgia.

Submit your questions for the mayor on Twitter with the hashtag #QuestionsForKeisha, by email at allATL@gpb.org or post questions during the live stream on the GPB News Facebook page on Friday, Aug. 16 beginning at 10 a.m.

Ross Terrell / Georgia Public Broadcasting

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms announced on Thursday a nighttime ban on e-scooters and bikes. Starting Friday, the dockless devices won’t be available for rent between 9 p.m. and 4 a.m.

The decision comes on the heels of multiple fatal crashes involving scooter riders. Four riders have been hit and killed since May.


Live stage productions and plays can frustrate the deaf community. That’s why a pair of UGA alumni decided to create their non-profit, Hands In! It’s a theater company in Athens that produces original plays in American Sign Language. The co-founders and directors want to bridge the gap between the deaf and hearing worlds by spreading awareness of ASL in dramatic media.

Beach and Ede spoke with On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott about their latest production, Wanderland. They also talked about their plans to expand on arts and culture for members of the deaf community. 


Stephen B. Morton / AP

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms is headed to Washington D.C. Wednesday to testify in front of a Senate committee about the city’s plans for climate change.

Other Georgia municipalities across the state are dealing with higher temperatures and extreme weather. Southern leaders, regardless of politics, are now taking actions to mitigate local effects of climate change, all while the federal government continues to roll back protections.


Ross Terrell / Georgia Public Broadcasting

Atlanta's jail task force held its first meeting Tuesday afternoon.  

The 25-member group will help determine the future of the city's detention center and how the space will be repurposed.  

Wikimedia Commons

The mayor of Atlanta has signed legislation banning smoking and vaping in enclosed areas such as bars, restaurants and the smoking rooms in one of the world's busiest airports.

The legislation signed by Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms will go into effect on Jan. 2.

pixabay

The Atlanta City Council has passed a ban on smoking and vaping at the world's busiest airport, as well as a number of public places.

Councilmembers Andre Dickens and Matt Westmoreland spearheaded the proposal, which passed by a majority vote on Monday.

The ordinance bans smoking at Atlanta's Hartsfield Jackson International Airport, which will shutter the smoking rooms inside the airport, as well as the indoor areas of most bars and restaurants.

 

 


Sign for the plan in front of construction
City of Atlanta Twitter

Atlanta is launching a new comprehensive plan to address affordable housing in the city, but one expert thinks it doesn't go far enough.


Jessica Gurell / GPB

In this month's edition of #QuestionsForKeisha with Rickey Bevington, Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms answers your questions on issues ranging from redeveloping the Gulch, preserving the city's tree canopy, attracting and retaining police officers and where to put a statue of hometown sports hero, Evander Holyfield.


Ross Terrell / Georgia Public Broadcasting

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms signed legislation Tuesday aimed at closing the city's jail. 

Standing outside the city's detention center, surrounded by community advocates, Bottoms approved forming a task force to determine how to close and repurpose the facility.  


GPB's Rickey Bevington and Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms
Sophia Saliby / GPB

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms joined GPB's Rickey Bevington live on 88.5 FM GPB at 10 a.m. Tuesday to answer your questions and discuss Atlanta's most pressing issues.

GPB's Rickey Bevington and Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms
Sophia Saliby / GPB

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms joined GPB's Rickey Bevington live on 88.5 FM GPB at 10 a.m. Tuesday to answer your questions and discuss Atlanta's most pressing issues. 

Watch the Facebook Live video below.

This will be a monthly conversation so submit your questions for the mayor on Twitter with the hashtag #QuestionsForKeisha or by email at allATL@gpb.org.

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Vice President Mike Pence had strong words for Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms during a stop in Atlanta Thursday. 

Speaking to a crowd of Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents at an Atlanta-area office, Pence said he had just heard about Bottoms' 2018 decision to move detainees from the city jail and not accept any new ones. 

Ross Terrell / Georgia Public Broadcasting

Police will re-examine evidence from the Atlanta child murder cases of the 1970s and '80s.  

From 1979 to 1981, nearly 30 African-American kids, teens and adults were killed in Atlanta. The majority of them were male.


Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, D- Md., the chairman of the Committee on Oversight and Reform is seeking a trove of information from Georgia’s governor and secretary of state as it investigates reports of issues reported during the state’s 2018 elections.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, the House Oversight Committee announced Wednesday a new investigation into allegations of voter suppression in Georgia during the 2018 midterm elections. The announcement came a few hours after federal prosecutors announced charges in the ongoing Atlanta City Hall corruption probe.

 


Skylar Nicholson / GPB

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms has thrown down the gauntlet over a bill that would allow the state to take control of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. 

“I think it’s ridiculous. I think it’s what I call an act of war,” Bottoms said during an interview for GPB’s Lawmakers show which airs  7 p.m. Monday.  “When you live in a glass house, you shouldn’t throw stones.  The state has had its own challenges.”

Flickr

A fight over control of Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport is brewing under the Gold Dome.


FACEBOOK/Mary Norwood

Some residents in the North Atlanta suburb of Buckhead are complaining about an increase of crime in their community.

 

It’s one of the most affluent neighborhoods in the city. But residents say the area is seeing a rise in violent crime, car thefts, and burglary.

 

 


GPB

If one more political event occurs before the year’s end, 2018 may just burst at the seams.


Keizers / Wiki Commons

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms announced Monday in a press release that she would not ask for a vote on Gulch redevelopments from Atlanta’s City Council.


Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms announces on Thursday the city will no longer accept ICE detainees at the jail.
Ross Terrell / GPB News

The City of Atlanta will no longer accept U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcements detainees at the Atlanta City Detention Center.

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms signed the executive order Thursday morning and called for the five ICE detainees in the city’s detention center to be moved elsewhere.


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The city of Atlanta has launched a new transparency tool as the federal bribery probe into City Hall spending grows wider.

Atlanta’s Open Checkbook shows how more than $2 billion was spent during fiscal years 2017 and 2018.

Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms says the website allows users to see more than 104,000 transactions, broken down by department, vendor and type of expense.


Felicia Moore

Atlanta’s second-most-powerful elected official has a lot on her plate.

Felicia Moore took over as Atlanta City Council president in January amidst an ongoing federal investigation into City Hall that’s netted several bribery indictments of both employees and contractors.

(AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

On this edition of Political Rewind, President Donald Trump may have signed an order keeping immigrant families arrested at the border together, but it’s his comments this morning about pending immigration legislation that some say just threw GOP members of Congress under the bus. 


Investigative Reporters and Editors

The city of Atlanta has received many honors over the years. In 1996, we were awarded the Summer Olympics. Next year, we'll host the Super Bowl. And this past weekend, Atlanta received the Golden Padlock Award. Given each year by a committee of investigative reporters and editors, that dubious distinction is awarded every year to the most secretive government agency or official.


(AP Photo/Todd Kirkland)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Governor Deal wraps up the official bill signing period with a flourish: his signature on one bill means Georgians could now pay state sales tax for many online purchases.  He also approved a controversial bill that could set a precedent for allowing Georgia cities to be split in two by residents looking for a change and a he vetoes a bill that was a showcase measure for GOP gubernatorial candidate Casey Cagle.  Plus, the Secretary of State’s Office launches an investigation into potential voting irregularities in last December’s race for Atlanta mayor. 

  • Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms Delivers State Of The City Address
  • Tech Companies Object To Georgia Cyber-Security Bill
  • Body Cams For ATL Customs And Border Protection Agents

Spring has arrived in Georgia. Are you ready to relax outside with a good book? We asked Literary Atlanta podcast host Alison Law and Decatur-based author Nicki Salcedo to tell us about the best new books by Southern writers. We also talked with the Breakroom gang about the most discussed news items of the week.

LaRaven Taylor / GPB

This week's Breakroom panel looked back at the week in news. Former NPR correspondent Kathy Lohr, film critic Stephen Brown, freelance writer Anjali Enjeti and "Greg's List" host Greg Williams chimed in on Mark Zuckerberg's congressional hearing, mass resignations at Atlanta's city hall and the controversial portrayals of Asian characters on shows such as "The Simpsons." 

Saturday marks two months since a school shooting killed 17 students and educators in Parkland, Florida. Since then, we’ve heard public outrage transform into ever more urgent calls for reforms to the nation's gun laws. Antoinette Tuff knows first-hand what it’s like to come face-to-face with a school shooter: On Aug. 20, 2013, she was working at Decatur’s Ronald E. McNair Discovery Learning Academy when a 20-year-old gunman entered with an AK-47 military assault rifle and 500 rounds of ammunition. Tuff talked the gunman down, and no one was injured or killed. She tells us whether teachers should be armed.

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