Juneteenth

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As June closes out and we enter into the second half of the year, Savannah offers plenty of events to engage with from panels on mental health to final celebrations of Pride Month. Marianne Ganem Poppell of Savannah Master Calendar and Mahogany Bowers of Blessings in a Bookbag have your guide. 


She took her columns for Teen Vogue seriously, and now she’s taking her skills to NPR.  On Second Thought met Isabella Sarmiento Gomez,  a new NPR Kroc Fellow from Atlanta.

Each year hundreds of people hike the Appalachian Trail, which starts right here in Georgia. This year, two married writers are doing them. We followed up with them for another audio check in along their journey.


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It's Juneteenth, also known as "Freedom Day"  — commemorating the ending of slavery in the United States. It was on June 19, 1865, when union soldiers arrived in Galveston, Texas, to announce slavery had been abolished. That was two years after President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation of Proclamation.

On Second Thought looked at Juneteenth traditions and history with Daina Ramey Berry. Berry is professor of history and African and African diaspora studies at the University of Texas at Austin. She's also author of four books that detail the history of slavery, including "The Price for Their Pound of Flesh."


Juneteenth, also known as Freedom Day, commemorates the official end of slavery in the U.S. in 1865, more than two years after President Abraham Lincoln issues the Emancipation Proclamation. Union soldiers arrived in Galveston, Texas, and announced the end of the American Civil War to the last group of enslaved people in the country.

The day itself is June 19, but celebrations kick off across Georgia this weekend, from big festivals to more intimate evening conversations.

 


Credit: George Fadil Muhammad

Juneteenth, also known as Freedom Day, commemorates the official end of slavery in the U.S. in 1865, more than two years after President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation. Union soldiers arrived in Galveston, Texas, and announced the end of the American Civil War to the last group of enslaved people in the country.

The day itself is June 19, but celebrations kick off across Georgia this weekend, from big festivals to more intimate evening conversations.


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There is plenty to do this weekend in sunny Savannah. Erica Backus with Visit Savannah and Tanya Milton from the Savannah Tribune have your guide. 


Coastal Ga. Weekend: Savannah, Coastal Events June 6-9

Jun 6, 2019
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Don't let the rainy weekend get you down — there's a lot you can do in Savannah to beat the bad weather blues. Do Savannah editor Joshua Peacock has your guide. 


On Second Thought for Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Jun 19, 2018
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The history of Juneteenth goes like this: President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863. But two years later, on June 19, 1865, slaves in Texas finally got the news that they were free. Now Juneteenth is the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States. However, many people have never heard of the holiday or even celebrate it. Historian and storyteller Lillian Grant Baptiste joined us from Savannah to give the history of Juneteenth and why people should celebrate the holiday.


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June 19 is Juneteenth, the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States. However, many people have never heard of the holiday or even celebrate it. Historian and storyteller Lillian Grant Baptiste joined us from Savannah to give the history of Juneteenth and why people should celebrate the holiday.


Sean Powers / On Second Thought

The history of Juneteenth goes like this: President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863. But two years later, on June 19, 1865, slaves in Texas finally got the news that they were free. Juneteenth is this Sunday, but Atlanta's Oakland Cemetery celebrated a few days early this year.  Groups of all ages were invited to tour the cemetery's historic African-American gravesites last weekend.