journalism

Cox Media Group

When Lorenzo "Lo" Jelks joined WSB-TV in 1967 as the station's first black, on-air reporter, viewers didn't see him. Though they heard his voice and saw his name, actually getting on camera represented another challenge entirely – one that required a concerted effort, led by civil rights activist Lonnie King and Atlanta's NAACP. 

A new documentary from the Atlanta Association of Black Journalists chronicles that effort and the trailblazing men and women who became Atlanta's first broadcast journalists. Among those featured in Black & Reporting: The Struggle behind the Lens is Walt Elder, the first African American to report morning headline news at WSB.


The first day of July marks the beginning of the new fiscal year and when many laws take effect. The record-setting $27.5 billion state operating budget also kicks in, complete with money for a new voting system and pay raises for teachers, school staff and state employees. 

Stephen Fowler, GPB's political reporter, joined On Second Thought to talk about new laws taking effect.


Leighton Rowell / GPB

In 2007, Venezuela's Hugo Chavez government effectively shut down RCTV, the nation's most influential private cable channel. The decision sparked protests across the country. Atlanta's Venezuelan community demonstrated locally, too.

Isabella Gomez Sarmiento, who was 10 at the time, attended with her parents and learned from them to value freedom of expression and an unfettered press.

The recent Georgia State University graduate now exercises those rights as a columnist for Teen Vogue. This fall, she joins NPR as a recipient of the prestigious Kroc Fellowship. First, she joined On Second Thought for a conversation about journalism and the future of the industry. 


Christiane Amanpour has been with CNN almost as long as the network has existed. She's covered the Gulf War, Bosnian War and Arab Spring. Amanpour moved to Atlanta in 1983 when she was hired by CNN as an entry-level desk assistant. She worked her way up to become chief international anchor for the international network.  

Armanpour was recently in Atlanta to accept her award in the Atlanta Press Club Hall of Fame. "On Second Thought" host Virginia Prescott met up with Amanpour before the ceremony and asked her about career as an international journalist.


Ted Eytan / Flickr

After a contentious interaction between CNN's Jim Acosta and President Donald Trump during a briefing, Acosta's press pass was revoked. CNN later sued the White House to restore Acosta's credentials, spurring a back and forth that ended with the White House reinstating Acosta's credentials. CNN dropped the lawsuit, but, in its place, the White House issued some broad new rules for journalists to follow during press briefings.

 

The event opened up a conversation about the press at a transformative political time. Jonathan Peters, assistant professor of journalism at UGA, joined us to discuss this unprecedented lawsuit and the changing role of journalists.

 


Twitter/Chritiane Amanpour

Christiane Amanpour has been with CNN almost as long as the network has existed. She's covered the Gulf War, Bosnian War and Arab Spring. Amanpour moved to Atlanta in 1983 when she was hired by CNN as an entry-level desk assistant. She worked her way up to become chief international anchor for the international network. 

Amanpour was recently in Atlanta to accept her award in the Atlanta Press Club Hall of Fame. "On Second Thought" host Virginia Prescott met up with Amanpour before the ceremony and asked her about career as an international journalist.


Today on the show, we discussed the upcoming Georgia special session on hurricane relief and heard from actors telling immigrant stories through "Accents."

We heard GPB's Leah Flemming interview Joshua Johnson about "1A" ahead of his visit to the studios on Thursday.

Gov. Nathan Deal called a special session of the Georgia legislature for Nov. 13 to address the devastation caused by Hurricane Michael. We spoke with "Political Rewind" host Bill Nigut about political responses to Hurricane Michael as well as the gubernatorial debates between Stacey Abrams, Brian Kemp and Ted Metz.

Georgia News Lab

President Trump's ongoing war with the media was amplified in several ways last week.

 

Trump’s staff banned a CNN reporter from a Rose Garden event because she asked the president tough questions during a press gaggle.

The President also attacked the media during a speech to veterans, where he told them not to trust negative news about him.


Is There Any More Trust In The Media?

Jul 12, 2018
Pixabay

After the shooting at the Capitol Gazette in Annapolis two weeks ago, journalists are questioning what free press means to American society. 


Screenshot by GPB / nytimes.com

When fashion designer Kate Spade died last week of an apparent suicide, there was an outpouring of grief, from Twitter to the front page of the New York Times. "Buying a Kate Spade handbag was a coming-of-age ritual for a generation of American women," declared the Times.


Adam Ragusea / GPB

The face of local news in Macon, Georgia, is changing. After nearly four decades, Friday is Oby Brown's last day at The Telegraph in Macon. 

GOOGLE IMAGES/PBS NEWSHOUR

Last month, Georgia Broadcast Hall of Famer Judy Woodruff was named sole anchor of PBS NewsHour.

Woodruff began her journalism career as a reporter in Atlanta. Since her early days in broadcast journalism, she has covered presidential campaigns and the White House. 

Investigative Reporters and Editors

Government transparency helps a democracy function, but many communities have a long way to go. One journalism organization is singling out the most secretive government agencies and officials with the Golden Padlock Award. The award, given out by Investigative Reporters and Editors (IRE), is not much of an honor. This weekend, it went to U.S.

Andrew Harnik / The Associated Press

Today marks one month, one week, and one day since Donald Trump took office. The president is slated to address a joint session of Congress tonight, outlining his agenda. As the Trump administration rolls out its plans, the nation remains divided over issues like immigration, abortion rights and “alternative facts.” President Trump’s distrust of the media is no secret. The role of journalism in a Trump-led America is under intense scrutiny.

A&E

Last month, the A&E Network canceled a documentary series about the Ku Klux Klan. The series, which featured Klan members in North Georgia, was scrapped because some of the people interviewed were paid to appear in it.

Screenshot from The Weather Channel

Breitbart recently used a clip from Atlanta-based The Weather Channel to supplement an article denying climate change. The Weather Channel fought back in a video in which anchor Kait Parker called out Breitbart’s article as incorrect and lacking in facts.

Did The Weather Channel make the ethically responsible choice? Is Breitbart justified in posting what its writers believe to be true?

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Fifty-five years ago, the University of Georgia accepted its first African-American students. It was the kind of progress Bill Shipp had demonstrated for years earlier.

JJIE Multimedia

Students at Kennesaw State University are taking journalism to another level. A group of them recently reported on the incarceration of a young man from Georgia named Christopher Thomas, who at the age of 15 was given a 40-year prison sentence for a non-lethal shooting. The reporters presented the story in a virtual world.

Google Images/PBS NewsHour

Judy Woodruff is among the many prominent journalists who got their start in Georgia. After working as a news department secretary at Atlanta's WQXI-TV, she got her first reporting job in 1970 at WAGA-TV (then the CBS affiliate). Five years later, Woodruff was hired by NBC News to cover the South, including Gov. Jimmy Carter's run for the White House.

Is there still a place for objectivity in journalism? Should that have ever been an expectation? We examine current examples of bias in the media and analyze attempts at neutrality in reporting with a panel of journalism experts. Should newspapers be allowed to endorse political candidate? And what will journalism look like after this year’s presidential race ends?  Emory University professor Hank Klibanoff, Kennesaw State University professor Carolyn Carlson, Creative Loafing reporter Rodney Carmichael, and Decaturish.com editor Dan Whisenhunt join us to discuss this topic.

The internet has changed the way journalists reach audiences, causing media outlets and journalism programs to struggle with how best to teach the craft journalism to the next generation. University of Georgia professor Valerie Boyd is spearheading a MFA program that specializes in teaching long-form journalism techniques to students. Guest host Adam Ragusea sits down with Boyd to talk about the value of long-form and it’s place in the current media landscape. 

FREEPRESS.NET

The internet has changed the way journalists reach audiences, causing media outlets and journalism programs to struggle with how best to teach the craft of journalism to the next generation. University of Georgia professor Valerie Boyd is spearheading a MFA program that specializes in teaching long-form journalism techniques to students. Guest host Adam Ragusea sits down with Boyd to talk about the value of long-form and it’s place in the current media landscape.

Police And The Press

Jul 12, 2016
AP Photo/Eric Gay

Shortly after the shooting in Dallas last week, the Dallas Police Department tweeted a picture of Mark Hughes as its initial suspect. Within minutes, Hughes became the most wanted man in the country. Multiple news outlets broadcasted the photo and thousands of users shared it on social media. Though cleared of all suspicion, Hughes had to go into hiding after he received death threats. 

The Anne E. Casey Foundation recently designated Georgia as the 42nd worst state in the country for kids. This ranking included economic factors, health and wellness and community. Although Georgia has improved in several areas, there is much more the state can do to make conditions better for its children. We talk with Georgia Health News editor Andy Miller and Laura Speer from the Anne E. Casey Foundation about the ranking and what's holding Georgia’s children back.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Few journalists ever want to find themselves in the headlines, but that’s exactly what happened a few weeks ago when a North Georgia newspaper publisher was jailed after he filed an open records request. He has since been released, all charges dropped, but the case is still attracting national attention, and raises very serious First Amendment issues. GPB’s Sean Powers reports.

 

Listen back to our 2015 series by GPB's Sean Powers on the Fannin Focus, and the role of small-town investigative journalism:

 

Nydia Tisdale

Nydia Tisdale is a citizen journalist who covers local political affairs across the state of Georgia. She’s logged hundreds of hours of video during her time as a reporter and has provided an inside look for civic-minded citizens. However, Tisdale’s activity hasn’t always been received with open arms. She’s currently embroiled in a lawsuit with Dawson County after she was forcefully ejected from a GOP rally when she refused to stop recording the event.

We hear from Tisdale about why she thinks citizen journalism plays a vital role in our media landscape.