John Lewis

www.afuarichardson.com

Originally aired on August 29, 2018:

 

Afua Richardson is an artist, musician, and performer who is working on several high profile projects.

She's one of the artists behind the World of Wakanda comic book series.

 

Afua is also working on a graphic novel that details the early life and work of civil rights icon and U.S. Representative John Lewis of Atlanta, titled 'RUN.'

 

 


harvarddcdp.org

Right now, some of the country’s top schools have a diversity problem.

 

According to recent data, more than 50% of students accepted to Ivy League schools are white, while black students make up just 11% of the student body.

 

 


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Freedom Parkway runs east in Atlanta, coming off the interstate that goes through the heart of the city. The King Center, named for Civil Rights icon Martin Luther King Jr., is just a few blocks away.

Now, the parkway has a new name. This time in honor of another Civil Rights leader: Congressman John Lewis. On Wednesday, Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms and other city council members renamed the street to “John Lewis Freedom Parkway.”

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Georgia Congressman John Lewis is a man who wears many hats. He is a civil rights leader, a principled politician and a graphic novelist. We talked to him about his three-part graphic memoir, "March," which tells the story of the civil rights movement from Lewis's perspective. 

Last year, we spoke with two Georgia-based comic book publishers who are working to develop more superheroes of color. Carlton and Darrick Hargro are the creative force behind the comic book company, 20th Place Media. We talked to them about one of their latest comics called “Moses,” which draws connections between the African slave trade and an alien abduction.

President Trump visited Jackson, Miss., on Saturday, where he toured and delivered remarks at the opening of a pair of museums dedicated to the state's role in the civil rights movement and as a celebration of its bicentennial.

While he largely did not stray from his prepared remarks, Trump's presence at the event drew a sharp rebuke from some prominent African-American elected officials and civil rights leaders, prompting some of them to skip the opening altogether.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, two prominent Georgians push back against President Trump: FBI Director Chris Wray defends the honor of his agency in response to Trump's Twitter attacks, and Congressman John Lewis says he won't attend the opening of a Mississippi civil rights museum if Donald Trump shows up. Plus, will Al Franken's resignation from the U.S. Senate put more pressure on Republicans to speak out against those in their own party accused of sexual harassment? Georgia's own Newt Gingrich says no way.

Two Democratic representatives, John Lewis and Bennie Thompson, say they will not attend the long-awaited opening on Saturday of two museums dedicated to Mississippi's history and civil rights struggle because of the planned appearance of President Trump.

Lewis is a Georgia Democrat and icon of the civil rights campaign. Thompson is Mississippi's only Democratic congressman. In a joint statement, they said they made their decision "after careful consideration and conversations with church leaders, elected officials, civil rights activists" and many others.

Updated at 5:15 p.m. ET

President Trump says the people of Las Vegas have shown the world their character, courage and resolve in the wake of Sunday's shooting massacre.

The president and first lady visited Las Vegas on Wednesday to show support for the victims as well as the people who cared for them.

"The only message I can say is that we're with you 100 percent," Trump said at University Medical Center, were dozens of the wounded were being treated. As he spoke, the president was surrounded by doctors and nurses in lab coats and scrubs.

Judge: Man Accused Of Threats To Rep. John Lewis’ Staff Is Competent

Jul 12, 2017

A man accused of threatening the staff of U.S. Rep. John Lewis has been deemed competent to stand trial.

A report from the warden at the Federal Medical Center in Lexington, Kentucky, indicates that Dante Antione Rosser is competent to stand trial and understands the nature of the legal proceedings, U.S. Magistrate Judge Alan Baverman said Tuesday.

Baverman had ordered a mental health evaluation during a hearing in March.

Man Accused Of Threats To Rep. Lewis' Staff Denied Bond

Mar 6, 2017

A judge says an Atlanta man accused of threatening the staff of U.S. Rep. John Lewis must undergo a mental health evaluation before the judge will consider releasing him from custody.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Alan Baverman denied bail Monday for 42-year-old Dante Antoine Rosser. He scheduled another hearing for March 23.

Court records say the Democratic congressman's Atlanta-based staff members expressed "grave concerns" for their safety after Rosser visited their office and also made repeated phone calls.

For years, parents have been warning their college-age children to be careful what they post on social media.

Now, one young candidate is learning this important lesson the hard way — everything you post can and will be used against you in politics.

FBI agents have arrested an Atlanta man accused of threatening the staff of Georgia Rep. John Lewis.

Special Agent David LeValley, who leads the agency's Atlanta office, announced that agents arrested 42-year-old Dante Antoine Rosser on Thursday on a charge of threatening to assault a federal official.

The American Library Association announced its annual children's book awards Monday. While the Caldecott and Newbery medals are the best known of these honors, this year, one of the lesser-known awards might attract the most attention.

That's because the Coretta Scott King Award for best African-American author went to Rep. John Lewis and his collaborator Andrew Aydin for March: Book Three, the third installment in the civil rights leader's graphic memoir.

Matt Gagnon / Public Domain

Democratic U.S. Rep. John Lewis, a civil rights leader who says he doesn't see Donald Trump as a "legitimate president," should be grateful for all that Republican presidents have done for black people, GOP Gov. Paul LePage said Tuesday.

LePage, who's white, said on WVOM-FM that the black Democratic Georgia congressman needs a history lesson.

Updated at 8 p.m. ET

Donald Trump lashed out at civil rights hero John Lewis on Twitter Saturday morning, a day after the Georgia Democratic congressman said in an interview he didn't view the president-elect as "legitimate" amid questions of Russia's interference in the U.S. elections.

Where the first day of Jeff Sessions' attorney general confirmation hearing focused on what the Alabama senator's relationship would be with the president if confirmed, the second day focused on his own past.

Sessions, a former Alabama attorney general, has a reputation for being tough on crime, but civil rights advocates testified that his reputation was made on the backs of vulnerable groups. Lawmakers who have worked with him, on the other hand, said they knew a just and fair man.

"We must bend" the arc of the moral universe

It was a weekend for Rep. John Lewis to remember his past. The Georgia Democrat and civil rights icon filled a Nashville auditorium and told stories of his role in the student movement.

And he showed that he can still rally a crowd of hundreds.

"When you see something that is not right, not fair, not just," he said, "you have a moral obligation, a mission and a mandate, to stand up, to speak up and speak out, and get in the way, get in trouble, good trouble, necessary trouble."

Early 1960s Nashville Arrest Records, Photos Of John Lewis Found

Nov 21, 2016
Nashville Police Department

When civil rights icon John Lewis returned to Nashville this weekend, he was greeted just like he was more than 50 years ago — with a mug shot and an arrest record.

But this time, his record was bound for the city's public library.

Officials in Tennessee's capital city have unearthed never-before-published photos and records documenting Lewis' arrests there decades ago, while he was leading an effort to desegregate the city's lunch counters.

Rep. John Lewis Stumps For Hillary Clinton

Nov 4, 2016

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And now let's hear from a Democrat, Representative John Lewis of Georgia, who's known for his work during the civil rights movement and is now focused on bringing out the African-American vote, if he can, for Hillary Clinton.

Congressman, welcome back to the program.

The opening of the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture marks a victory for Congressman John Lewis (D-Georgia), who pushed for it for years. Lewis' story as one of the original Freedom Riders is included in Smithsonian Magazine's Black in America issue, which came out this month. We revisit our recent conversation with him. 

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Georgia Congressman John Lewis wears many hats - civil rights leader, politician, and graphic novelist. His story and the story of the civil rights movement is told through a three part graphic memoir called, “March.” The final installment of the series is out this week. We talk with Congressman Lewis, his co-author Andrew Aydin, and the book’s illustrator Nate Powell about telling history through comics.

The Bernie Sanders campaign is in talks with the Hillary Clinton campaign to call for the party to unanimously nominate Clinton for the presidency on Tuesday night, a Sanders spokesperson tells NPR's Arnie Seipel.

What's being discussed is that, near the end of the roll call of state delegates, there would be a call for acclamation by the Vermont delegation, making it likely that Sanders himself would make her nomination official.

Trevor Young / GPB

Congressman John Lewis is back in Atlanta after staging a sit-in on the U.S. House floor last week to address gun control. He hosted a town hall meeting Wednesday at Ebenezer Baptist Church to continue the discussion on gun violence.

Hundreds of people turned out to hear Lewis speak. He said his actions last week hark back to methods of protest popular during the civil rights movement of the 1950s and '60s.

Courtesy Rep. John Lewis

Donald Trump fired his campaign manager, his fundraising numbers are terrible, and his poll numbers are sinking. Trump is working to assure nervous Republicans, while Hillary Clinton hits Trump over his business experience. Clinton is also vetting possible running mates, and looking to win over Bernie Sanders supporters.