jobs

Wikimedia Commons

Those who work ticket booths, security, food stalls and as ushers at concerts are without work while events are postponed statewide as hundreds of Georgians test positive for the coronavirus. Delta has laid off hundreds of contractors after a number of the Atlanta-based airline's flights were canceled. Plants scattered through the state are among the most recent to announce layoffs and closing.

 

However, while many of Georgia’s businesses are suffering from mass closures amid the spread of the coronavirus, others are hiring more than ever before, due to the increase in demand at grocery stores, restaurants and pharmacies.

Michael Rivera / Wikimedia Commons

Georgia added more than 20,000 jobs in June, pushing the state to a new record high.

According to State Labor Commissioner Mark Butler, Georgia currently has more than 4.6 million jobs.

“The numbers for June are very impressive,” Butler said. “We set yet another record for jobs, fewer people filed unemployment claims and our number of employed residents is climbing. There’s plenty to be encouraged about in the June report.”

Marianna Bacallao

Organizers and city leaders are still puzzling out why a job fair at the Anderson Conference Center in Macon recently saw an unexpectedly large turnout.

More than 3,500 job hunters stood in a line a mile long, and some continued to wait hours after the fair technically closed.  This all happened amidst reports of low unemployment rates for the county and state.


In Macon, A Mile-Long Line For Jobs

Jun 5, 2019
Marianna Bacallao

Over 3,500 job hunters waited in a mile-long line stretching down Eisenhower Parkway in Macon for a warehouse job fair at the Anderson Conference Center June 4. Some applicants left early after hearing that Amazon, the largest employer, was not hiring or conducting interviews on site.

Courtesy Trenton Tye/Facebook

Trenton Tye is one of few remaining blacksmiths in Georgia. Tye is also one of the judges on Discovery's "Master of Arms." When not on TV, he works in the peanut industry near Albany. Tye spoke with "On Second Thought" producer La'Raven Taylor about his daily tasks on the job. It's part of our series in which we learn all about what people do inside the industrial buildings, gleaming office towers, company trucks, vast farmlands and even homes that fuel the region's economy. 

If you have a unique job that you're passionate about sharing, email us at onsecondthought@gpb.org. 


Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

Do you love the kitchen? Do you love it enough earn your living there?

High School students at in the culinary arts track at the Hutchings College and Career Academy in Macon get to answer both of those questions at the school’s Compass Rose Cafe.

 

Waffle House

Come this December, millions of American workers will be eligible for overtime pay. That's because of a new policy finalized by the Labor Department. In our regular series, “Break It Down,” we talk about the history of the 40-hour work week. Then, Wall Street Journal reporter Melanie Trottman discusses how the new overtime protections work and who’s covered by them.