jim crow

What's In A Name? | Jim Crow Road

Jul 18, 2018
Michael David Murphy

In the Georgia town of Flowery Branch about 45 miles northeast of Atlanta, there is a street called Jim Crow Road. GPB Atlanta listener Chris Livingston asked us on our website to find out how the street got its regrettable name.


The United States Department of Justice estimates nearly two-thirds of all jail inmates have mental health problems. In Georgia, a new investigation raises serious questions about the quality of care those inmates receive.Over the last decade, 1 in 6 of more than 500 deaths in Georgia jails has involved inmates who showed signs of mental illness, the Georgia News Lab, WSB-TV and Atlanta Journal-Constitution investigation has found. We spoke with Georgia News Lab reporters Christina Maxouris and Harrison Young to find out more. The AJC's Brad Schrade also joined.

Family of Henry "Peg" Gilbert

In 1947 in Harris County, Georgia, an African-American man named Henry “Peg” Gilbert was arrested and jailed, without legal cause.

Five days later, a mob beat him to death in his jail cell. He was a deacon at Union Springs Baptist Church as well as a respected landowner. He was arrested by the county’s sheriff on suspicions of Gilbert hiding a fugitive. There was never a trial or conviction. 

In the year since President Trump took office, a new wave of social movements has rippled across the country. March for Science Atlanta brings together scientists, data geeks and average citizens to push for policies that support and reflect research. The group will hold its annual Rally for Science April 14. The Rally for Science keynote speaker is Emory University professor Linda DeGutis. She previously served as director of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at the CDC. DeGutis will speak on the importance of gun violence research. We spoke with DeGutis and March for Science organizers Louis Kiphen and Allison Halterman.

Courtesy of National Memorial for Peace and Justice

The National Memorial for Peace and Justice details a painful legacy in American history: the lynchings of thousands of African-American men, women and children. 

Erik Voss

For Women’s History Month, On Second Thought is paying tribute to Georgia's female trailblazers. 

Civil Rights icon Dr. Roslyn Pope made history in 1960 when, as a student at Spelman College, she wrote “An Appeal for Human Rights." The document was instrumental in advancing the Atlanta Student Movement's efforts to end segregation.

On Second Thought producer Fenly Foxen spoke with Pope about her experiences as a student leader in the Civil Rights Movement. 

After years of legal wrangling and intimidation, New Orleans has begun the process of dismantling four monuments of the Confederate and Jim Crow eras.

The first monument, which honors members of a white supremacist paramilitary group who fought against the city's racially integrated, Reconstruction-era police force in 1874, was dismantled and removed before the sun rose Monday.

Following death threats, the contractors wore flak jackets and helmets as they broke down the Battle of Liberty Place monument, as WWNO's Tegan Wendland reports.