James Brown

Luis Sandoval, Simon David

An upcoming documentary aims to highlight Atlanta soul musician Lee Moses for a new era. The documentary, "Time and Place," focuses on Moses' life and the soul scene in Atlanta during the 1970s. The documentary takes its name from Moses' solo album. The album has become a staple of Southern soul despite not finding commercial success when it was released. 

 

Filmmaker Simon David stopped by "On Second Thought" to discuss the documentary and how it traces Atlanta's soul scene through those who remember it. Doris Moses, Lee Moses' widow, also joined the conversation.

 

Courtesy Deantoni Parks/Twitter and Nelson Patton/Facebook

We bended our Georgia Playlist rules this week. Normally, we ask musicians and bands to pick two songs by Georgia born or based artists. For Friday's show, we have three. Nelson Patton features Dave Nelson on looping trombone and Marlon Patton on drums and moog bass pedals. The experimental duo's debut album, "Along The Way," is out now and they will perform with Deantoni Parks at The Bakery in Atlanta on Monday, Jan. 21. 

Deantoni Parks is an experimental drummer, songwriter and actor raised in Newnan. Parks is now based in New York. We avoided a stand-off between the three by allowing each one pick for the Georgia playlist. 


GPB

You know James Brown, Otis Redding and The Allman Brothers Band. They all carried big sounds all over the world and started in the fairly small city of Macon. A new documentary highlights some of Macon's most influential musicians and performers. It's called "The Macon Sound."

The film's executive producer and narrator, Sharon Collins, gave "On Second Thought" a preview.  "The Macon Sound" premieres Tuesday at 8 p.m. on GPB TV .


Wikipedia Commons

On this day in 1933, James Brown, who lived much of his life in Augusta, was born.

The funk legend recorded sixteen singles that topped the Billboard R&B Charts, including this song in 1966, “It’s a Man’s, Man’s, Man's World.”

Brown’s signature voice and provocative dance moves inspired a generation of future artists. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1986.   

Clyde Stubblefield, the funk drummer whose work with James Brown made him one of the most sampled musicians in history, died Saturday morning in Madison, Wis., his publicist confirmed. Stubblefield was 73; his publicist did not provide a cause of death.

Afropunk

Some artists live in a city, others are of the city.

Phillip Depoy and Beverly “Guitar” Watkins, our two guests on this edition of "Two Way Street," are in the latter category. Yes, they both make their homes in Atlanta – Watkins in the Old Fourth Ward, Depoy in Decatur – but Atlanta and Georgia also are deeply influential in the art they produce.

The names James Brown and Apollo Theater have practically become synonymous; it's hard to think of one without the other. Beginning in 1963, Brown released three albums recorded there. But there was a fourth — recordings from Sept. 13 and 14, 1972 — that has been buried ever since. Now, Get Down with James Brown: Live At The Apollo Vol. 4 is finally out on vinyl, with a CD to follow this summer.

jasonikeemrodgers.com

We add another pair of songs to our essential Georgia Playlist. Jason Rodgers, conductor of the all-black group ‘Orchestra Noir," joins the show to share two of his favorite Georgia tunes from Ray Charles and James Brown. 

Enjoy this live version of Ray Charles' "Unchain My Heart"

Also, check out James Brown performing "Please, Please, Please" live on the TAMI show

Heinrich Klaffs / Wikimedia Commons

A new biography about the Godfather of Soul reveals what James Brown sought for so long to hide - his roots.  Author James McBride writes that the facts of Brown's life have become "twisted like a pretzel beyond recognition." McBride tries to set the record straight with "Kill 'Em And Leave: Searching For James Brown And The American Soul."