international trade

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From the devastation of Hurricane Michael to trade tariffs, Georgia farmers have faced months of uncertainty. After stalled disaster and tariff aid packages, American farmers are still struggling while being shuffled around the political gameboard. 

 

Mark Peele is a cotton grower and president of the South Central Georgia Gin Company. He joined On Second Thought on the line from Berrien County to talk about the outlook — and mindset — of Georgia farmers. Jeffrey Harvey, director of the Georgia Farm Bureau's Public Policy Department, also joined the conversation from GPB's studio in Macon.

 

 

Georgia Pecan Commission

The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and other media are reporting that the U.S. and China are closer to an agreement on trade. They're citing anonymous sources briefed on the matter.

The Trump administration waived its deadline for imposing additional tariffs on China last week, and talks over the weekend could mean a reduction in tariffs by both countries to pre-dispute levels. The news signals potential relief for many affected Georgia industries. Vivian Yue, associate professor of economics at Emory University, spoke with "On Second Thought" about these U.S. and China trade negotiations and what it could mean for the state's economy. Jeffrey Dorfman, professor of agricultural and applied economics at the University of Georgia, also joined the discussion.

 

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Have you been listening to the economic news lately? If you find your mind jumbled with talk of trade, taxes and tariffs, you're not alone. Even people who took basic economics in college or those who regularly read financial news are swimming in language that boggles the mind — whether we admit it or not —  so On Second Thought broke it all down. 


Soft lounge music pipes through the speakers as elegantly dressed shoppers peruse organic produce and meats at City'super, one of Shanghai's most upscale markets, a cross between Whole Foods and Louis Vuitton. But one look at the price of an American steak is enough to conjure a mental scratch of a needle across this soothing soundtrack: Nearly $60 for a pound of USDA Prime ribeye.

The head of the president's National Trade Council this week offered a decidedly bleak and suspicious view of global trade. Peter Navarro says foreign companies buying up U.S. corporations are posing a threat to national security.

That might sound bad, but it's a fringe view that puts him at odds with the vast majority of economists.