infrastructure

Randolf Rautenberg / Flickr

Eighteen miles of I-85 could be an on-ramp to the future.

The Ray C. Anderson Memorial Highway, or The Ray, stretches from West Point to LaGrange. Named for a carpet manufacturer once called the "greenest CEO," The Ray is now a proving ground for technologies that could make infrastructure safer and more ecologically sustainable.

So, how would it work? We asked Allie Kelly, executive director of The Ray.


(AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

On this edition of Political Rewind, three Georgians take center stage in controversies now swirling on Capitol Hill.  FBI Director Chris Wray contradicts the White House story on when administration officials learned that Rob Porter was suspected of abusing his two former wives.  Will Chief of State John Kelly get the boot over concerns about what he knew and when?  Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue faces fire for a proposal to substitute food stamps for government-selected food boxes, but what's really behind the idea?  Also, David Perdue is in the spotlight as he pushes his plan to curt

President Trump's astonishing press conference on Tuesday was, ostensibly, an announcement about infrastructure. But his brief remarks on the permitting process were entirely overshadowed by his defense of attendees at a white supremacist rally, among other remarks.

Despite America's rapt attention on former FBI Director James Comey's testimony, the White House has been observing Infrastructure Week. Infrastructure is one of the only policy areas that could have crossover appeal, but there has been little real movement so far on getting something through Congress.

Speaking to CEOs on Tuesday, President Trump touted his plans for deregulation and infrastructure-building. In the process, he made a striking claim: that the Obama administration passed an infrastructure bill that built nothing and gave money to social programs.

You may not remember that happening (because it didn't). Here's what Trump seems to have been saying and how close to the truth it is.

The nation's roads, bridges, airports, water and transit systems are in pretty bad shape, according to the civil engineers who plan and design such infrastructure.

The new report card from the American Society of Civil Engineers gives the infrastructure of the United States a D-plus.

President Trump met with airline executives on Thursday morning and had a message they were happy to hear, vowing to roll back regulations, lower corporate taxes and modernize the air traffic control system.

Trump said his private pilot, "a real expert" and a "smart guy," has told him that the government has been buying the wrong type of equipment in its years-long effort to upgrade the current control system. He said U.S. airports "used to be the best, now they're at the bottom of the rung."

CAP/Jacobs Engineering

A new project could heal the 50-year-old gash cut through the heart of Atlanta by interstate highways. The idea? Build a platform over the Downtown Connector and turn exhaust-filled airspace into greenspace-anchored development.

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Paying for Crumbling Stormwater Systems

Feb 23, 2016
Grant Blankenship / Georgia Public Broadcasting

 

Clay Murphey, a project manager for Macon Bibb County, walked through an eight-foot-high stormwater culvert under a busy intersection. As sloshed through three inches of water, Murphey ran a hand along a jagged crack in the dusty red brick.

"This is the stuff we're concerned about. These large cracks," Murphey said. “You got seepage that's coming from above. That shouldn't be happening. Everytime you're seeping, you are washing away the mortar that's holding this brick in place.”

Then Murphey pointed down to brick rubble lying in the water.