hurricane

David Goldman / Associated Press

Farmers in Georgia have been impacted by a multitude of events in the last few years: hurricanes, stalled aid, trade policy and, on top of that, drought. 

In September, the Southeast saw record heat — with little to no rain. Now, there is lots of rain in the forecast for the coming week. On Second Thought checked in with onion farmer Aries Haygood of A&M Farms in Lyons, Georgia, to hear about the issues impacting farmers.


National Hurricane Center

UPDATE Thursday, 5:00 p.m.: Gov. Kemp declared a state of emergency in a dozen coastal Georgia counties ahead as Hurricane Dorian approaches the Southeast.

The affected counties are Brantley, Bryan, Camden, Charlton, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long, Pierce and Wayne.  Kemp says for now the major danger for southeast Georgia is the potential for flooding from Dorian which looks to become a massive but very slow moving storm. State laws preventing price gouging at the gas pump are also in effect.

UPDATE Thursday, 3:00 p.m: Gov. Brian Kemp reiterated that Dorian's path was still too uncertain to make big moves in emergency preparedness in Georgia. However, he did say that heavy rain and unusually high tides will make flooding in some parts of the state almost a certainty. Kemp advised preparing for flooding now.

UPDATE 6:18 p.m.: Governor Brian Kemp said in a briefing Wednesday evening that state officials are monitoring Hurricane Dorian closely and preparing for potential evacuations, although it was too soon to tell the exact track of the storm or predict its impact on Georgia.

Michael Sullivan/UGA Skidaway Institute

Forecasters predict a more active hurricane season this year, now that the El Nino weather pattern has ended. Current predictions estimate as many as 10 to 17 possible named storms.

Getting accurate models of a hurricane’s path plays a big part in coastal communities’ ability to stay safe.

Researchers at the University of Georgia aim to improve the precision of these models by launching underwater autonomous gliders to collect data from the briny deep.


J. Cindy Hill / GPB News

Coastal Georgia's largest county wants to help residents prepare for an emergency during hurricane season.

The Chatham County Emergency Management Agency in Savannah plans to hold a free "Citizen Hurricane Academy" the weekend of July 20.

Kimberly Vardeman / Wikimedia Commons

Wednesday marks six months since Hurricane Michael blew through parts of south Georgia. With planting season just a few weeks away, Georgia cotton growers are keeping an eye on the weather. 

 


NOAA

In 2017, thousands evacuated southeast Texas in preparation for Hurricane Harvey. As they sped down the highway away from the storm, one car drove toward it. Inside it was Russell Lewis.

Officially, Lewis is NPR's Southern Bureau chief, but he's also known as the go-to guy on NPR's "go team," which covers earthquakes, fires, flood and other disasters; both natural and man-made. Lewis is often the first member of the team on a plane and on the ground, setting up logistics, drivers, translators and supplies in places where systems have broken down, so NPR can bring those events to listeners.


Senate Votes No On Hurricane Disaster Relief

Apr 1, 2019
Grant Blankenship / GPB

A fight between President Donald Trump and Democrats over hurricane relief for Puerto Rico stalled a widely backed disaster aid bill that's a top priority for some of the president's Southern GOP allies.

Only about $600 million out of the $13.45 billion relief package was earmarked for Puerto Rico. The rest was intended for Southern farmers who had their businesses upended and in some cases literally ripped from the ground by Hurricane Michael last year. 

Courtesy of AP Images

It takes about a decade to grow a productive pecan tree and a matter of minutes to take one down. A University of Georgia specialist estimates Hurricane Michael's 100 mph winds left 75 percent of pecan crops unharvestable in several south Georgia counties. UGA also estimates a total of $2 billion in losses to the state's agriculture industry.

Five months after the storm, many farmers are still picking up the pieces. "On Second Thought" has been following up with growers ever since the storm. Randy Hudson's family has run Hudson Pecan Company in Irwin County for more than 150 years. Rob Cohen owns Pecan Ridge Plantation in Decatur County. He's been in the family business for several decades. Cohen and Hudson gave updates on their crops as a new season begins.


Josephine Bennett/GPB News

Florida and Georgia are left picking up the pieces following Hurricane Michael.

The storm claimed the lives of at least 11 people, including an 11-year old girl old girl who died after a tree fell on her home in Seminole County. Michael also has left damages amounting to billions of dollars, which will affect Georgia's agriculture activities. Utility crews around the state were still working to restore power to thousands on Friday.


WALB News 10

We spoke by phone to people from McRae, Plains and Valdosta about how Hurricanes may be the new normal for South Georgia. 


Cat 3 Hurricane Michael Arrives In SW Georgia

Oct 10, 2018

Hurricane Michael hit the Florida Panhandle as a Category 4 early Wednesday afternoon and moved into southwest Georgia as a Category 3 storm, officials said.

You can follow updates from GEMA here.

A tornado watch was issued until 2 a.m. Thursday for most of the state and tornado warnings have been issued as far north as Cobb County.


Weather hurricane michael hurricane
Brendan Farrington / Associated Press

Hurricane Michael makes landfall in Florida on Wednesday. The hurricane is expected to later hit Southwest and Central Georgia, according to the National Weather Service.

We spoke with Marshall Shepherd, the program director for atmospheric sciences at the University of Georgia, about tracking the hurricane over the week and how meterologists convey the severity of storms. We also spoke with Gwen Cooper, an author and pet rescue expert about what to do with pets during extreme weather.


Gov. Nathan Deal's office

Barely a month after cleanup from the last major hurricane to hit the Southeast, Hurricane Michael is expected to bring life-threatening storm surge along portions of the Florida Panhandle and damaging winds through Georgia, officials say.

About 10 a.m. Tuesday, Gov. Nathan Deal declared a state of emergency in 92 counties in the state.

Michael is expected to make landfall Wednesday as a Category 3 major hurricane, according to the National Hurricane Center.

J. Cindy Hill / GPB News

The latest forecasts show Hurricane Florence making landfall in the Carolinas, but the storm’s already causing dangerous conditions on Georgia’s beaches.

Ellen Eldridge / GPB News

The effects of the first named storm of 2018 claimed lives before the official start of hurricane season, but leaders with Georgia Power, the National Weather Service and the Georgia Emergency Management Agency have been investing in technology, planning and preparing.

Despite advances in technology, the best resource for damage assessment after a storm is "boots on the ground," Georgia Power's David Maske said at a hurricane summit last week.


NOAA

Friday marks the beginning of the 2018 hurricane season, which stretches from June 1 to Nov. 30, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

This year, NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center forecasts a 40 percent chance of a normal season, and a 35 percent chance of an above-normal season. 

Today's coastal news headlines include:

  • Savannah joins growing number of Georgia municipalities suing opioid makers
  • First stand-alone ER is coming to South Carolina's Lowcountry
  • Hurricane "Cone of Uncertainty" is shrinking

In the wake of back-to-back natural disasters, insurance companies are flooded with claims for destroyed property. For many, there's doubt about the willingness and ability of those insurance providers to handle the millions of dollars in damage. We sit down with Carrie Teegardin, an investigative reporter for the Atlanta Journal Constitution, to discuss her reporting as part of our occasional series, “AJC Investigates.” 

Where will it go? How strong will it be? When will it hit? Those are the answers everyone wants — not the least of which are the hurricane forecasters themselves.

To get those answers, hundreds of millions of data points — everything from wind speeds to sea temperatures — pouring in from satellites, aircraft, balloons, buoys and ground stations are fed into the world's fastest computers and programmed with a variety of models at different resolutions, some looking at the big picture, others zooming in much closer.

America seems to be a magnet for devastating hurricanes these days.

This year, Harvey came out strong with its horrific toll on parts of Texas and Louisiana. Now Irma, downgraded slightly Friday morning to a Category 4 storm from its most recent days as a Category 5, has left destruction in its wake as it plows through the Caribbean and Cuba — and is on path to hit Florida Sunday morning.

NOAA

 

 

Hotels across the South are booking up, as people leave the coast ahead of Hurricane Irma.

All it takes is a quick look at any of the online booking sites to see. Georgia’s hotel rooms are sold out. Brigette Lee is the director of sales of the Holiday Inn on the north side of Macon, Georgia. She says people leaving the South Carolina barrier islands beat Floridians to the punch by looking for rooms as long ago as last Friday.

Forecasters say the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season, which begins Thursday, could bring "above-normal" storm activity. Residents along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts are making sure they have supplies and plans in place if a storm hits.

National Hurricane Center

As Hurricane Matthew hit Haiti and Cuba Tuesday, emergency management officials on the Georgia and South Carolina coasts urged residents to prepare for possible effects of the storm later in the week.

City of Savannah

Savannah’s 911 Dispatch Center received more than 2,400 calls for service Friday, after Tropical Storm Hermine crossed Southeast Georgia.

City officials say the major impact of the storm was from downed trees and power lines caused by heavy winds. Georgia Power officials say over 100,000 people experienced outages across the state, the majority in Savannah and Brunswick, according to The Savannah Morning News.