housing

David Goldman / AP

As federal money pours into Georgia to end new HIV infections, hundreds of people living with HIV and AIDS are being threatened with eviction. Nonprofit providers accuse the city of being chronically late with a total of $41 million in federal HIV funds — money reserved to provide HIV and AIDS clients a place to live. 

On Monday, the Atlanta City Council voted to appropriate $1.5 million in emergency funding to pay for housing and other services that clients of The Living Room depend on. A lawsuit filed by that organization in July accuses the city of withholding funds.


SanjibLemar / Wikimedia Commons

In many American neighborhoods, it's illegal to build anything other than a single-family home on most lots zoned for residential properties. Take Sandy Springs for example: 85% of the Atlanta suburb's residential land allows for only detached, single-family homes. Some people want to change that, and regional leaders are passing laws to increase density. Others want things to stay exactly as they are: One family. One house. One yard.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

The landlord of a Macon apartment complex that made news when tenants were forcibly evicted when property managers let the water get cut off may have his day in court and in front of a jury.

Attorneys for Crystal Lake Apartments owner Steve Firestone asked for a jury trial Friday during Firestone’s second appearance in Macon-Bibb County Municipal Court. Firestone could have faced as much as 180 days in jail over the single building code violation brought before that court.


GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, plans to expand broadband to rural Georgia may be in jeopardy after legislators kill a bill that would pay for the project with a tax on video streaming services. Where will the funds to pay for the project come now?


GPB

The Fair Housing Act is 50 years old this year. Former President Lyndon Johnson implemented this landmark piece of civil rights legislation days after Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination. King often said housing was a key victory in the struggle for African-American equity in the United States. 


Leighton Rowell / GPB

Fifty years after the Fair Housing Act, we took a look at the state of fair housing and affordable housing in Georgia today.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

During the 1930s, Macon, Georgia was the nation's most redlined city. That term was not used until much later, but the practice -- denying mortgage loans or municipal services that effectively drew a line around areas based on race or income -- was common. Redlining is now illegal, but as GPB's Grant Blankenship reported in 2016, finding affordable housing in Macon -- and many of Georgia's growing cities -- is tough.


Ross Terrell / GPB News

The Fair Housing Act is 50 years old this year. Former President Lyndon Johnson implemented this landmark piece of civil rights legislation days after Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination. King often said housing was a key victory in the struggle for African-American equity in the United States.

We spoke with Dan Immergluck, a professor in the Urban Studies Institute at Georgia State University. He discussed how legislation from 50 years ago shaped how housing in Georgia functions today.


Underground Atlanta Developer Holds Community Feedback Meeting

Jul 13, 2017
wikipedia.org

 

On Thursday, the developers hoping to breathe new life into Underground Atlanta held their first community meeting since purchasing the property.

Steve Howe is Chief Operating Officer with WRS, the real estate company that owns the site. He’s looking to turn the 12 acres in the heart of downtown Atlanta into a residential and commercial destination.

“We want to bring people that will live here, so that they can eat here, they can work here, and just really truly activate this part of town that is not as active as it really should be,” he said.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

How will you celebrate when you pay off your house? After 20 years in her home purchased with the help of Macon Area Habitat for Humanity, Lillie Ward burned her mortgage.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

      

There are lots of tools for reviving a dying neighborhood. There are tax incentives, chasing deadbeat property owners and non-profits to rebuild houses to name a few.  

In Macon-Bibb, another tool, this time public art, is at the heart of an effort to renew the city's Mill Hill neighborhood. A few weeks ago, that effort hit a snag: the first two artists in residence here were fired. As to why, that is still not clear, but events leading up to their dismissal might raise questions about how well the art-based scheme fits this neighborhood.

The demolition of the Tindall Heights housing project in Macon, and the relocation of its residents, provides a lens into the issue of affordable housing in the United States on the We Live Here podcast from St. Louis Public Radio. With reporting from Grant Blankenship of GPB Macon, Devin Katayama KQED in San Francisco and the We Live Here team from St. Louis Public Radio.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Macon-Bibb County political leaders got their first look at an old school at the heart of a new housing development Tuesday.

A few members of the Macon-Bibb County Commission and Mayor Robert Reichert toured the still under renovation A.L. Miller High School building. For Commission member and Miller Alumnus Elaine Lucas, the tour brought memories and hopes for what will come once this is low income housing.

"It's going to be a boost for this whole area. A lot of our neighborhoods are in decline and this is one of them," Lucas said.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

 

Demolition formally began Monday in one of Macon’s oldest and largest public housing projects, Tindall Heights.

During a ceremony that could have looked like a groundbreaking from a distance, officials and politicians swung golden sledgehammers to break the first piece of the project’s red brick.

For longtime educator and former Bibb County School Board President,  Thelma Dillard, the day was bittersweet.

“I'm here today because I want to see the ending of my beginning,” she said.

A Macon Program To Revitalize a Neighborhood Expands

Apr 26, 2016

A program in Macon-Bibb County that pays the down payment for Macon homes is going to expand. The target is the Bealls Hill neighborhood, a place that used to be downtrodden but is now revitalized. Twenty-thousand dollar down payments are provided as Mercer matches Knight Foundation money. So far since 2007, about a third of the project has been bought with this assistance. Now, Historic Macon wants to expand to other businesses who might match that Knight money. GPB's Michael Caputo talked with Ethiel Garlington of Historic Macon about the effort. 

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

The tick tick tick with the turn of the key only meant one thing: this moving truck wasn't starting.

Battery? Dead.

Not too long before on this sunny Wednesday afternoon, Kenny Howell Jr. had pulled up behind the apartment he, his girlfriend and their three kids shared in the Tindall Heights public housing project in Macon, ready to load up and go.