HIV

David Goldman / AP

As federal money pours into Georgia to end new HIV infections, hundreds of people living with HIV and AIDS are being threatened with eviction. Nonprofit providers accuse the city of being chronically late with a total of $41 million in federal HIV funds — money reserved to provide HIV and AIDS clients a place to live. 

On Monday, the Atlanta City Council voted to appropriate $1.5 million in emergency funding to pay for housing and other services that clients of The Living Room depend on. A lawsuit filed by that organization in July accuses the city of withholding funds.


Pexels.com

Last year, U.S. retail sales of essential oils topped $133 million. That number doesn’t include sales from multi-level marketers, who sell directly to buyers. While the market booms with promises of improved health and pain relief, there are some safety concerns.

Georgia Health News reporting found essential oils contributed to two calls per day on average to the Georgia Poison Center. Those cases usually involved children who are poisoned.


David Goldman / AP

A metro Atlanta county will be one of three pilot sites nationwide to run a federal program aimed at preventing the spread of HIV, health officials said Thursday.

In 2017, Georgia had the second highest rate in the nation of new diagnoses of HIV, and more than 58,700 people are currently living with HIV in the state.

Georgia Latest State to Legalize Needle Exchange to Stop HIV

Apr 4, 2019
Sanya Mansoor / AP

James Lane has a backpack full of syringes slung across his shoulder as he goes to exchange used needles for sterile ones at a small booth set up by an Atlanta needle exchange clinic. The clinic, which operates in an area known as a hot spot for drug use in Atlanta, collects and distributes syringes. It's among just a few of its kind operating publicly in Georgia and a godsend to Lane, who says he turned to heroin and cocaine to self-medicate for post-traumatic stress.

 

Robert F. Bukaty / AP

A bill passed by the Georgia legislature this year will expand access to drugs that can prevent HIV infection.

 

PreP is short for pre-exposure prophylaxis, and when taken faithfully, PreP drugs can actually prevent people who get exposed to HIV from getting infected by the virus.

 

 


Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar during an interview at the 2019 National HIV Prevention Conference in Atlanta.
Robert Jimison / GPB

Just over a month after President Donald Trump shared his goal to eliminate HIV in the next decade, his health secretary is out touting details of how the administration hopes to end transmission and prevent new diagnoses by 2030. 


Courtesy of AP Images

Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show Georgia has the highest rate of new Human Immunodeficiency Viruses (HIV) infections proportionate to population. The problem is especially severe in metro Atlanta. 

President Trump is proposing $291 million in funding to end HIV transmissions in the United States by 2030. "On Second Thought" wanted to know how realistic this goal was, so Dr. Carlos del Rio from the Emory School of Public Health joined the show to discuss the initiative and how it affects Georgia. 


Sanford Health / Flickr

A new study from Johns Hopkins University finds that 1 in 8 organ transplants in the United States involves organs from someone who died of a drug overdose, adding another set of ethical questions to a hot-button issue.

 

With higher rates of homelessness and poverty, as well as diseases such as HIV, the demographic makeup of donors who have died of overdoses is radically different from that of the “normal” pool of organ donors.

 

Could organs from patients who overdosed actually pose health risks to the people who receive them? To answer this question, we turned to Dr. Christine Durand, who co-authored the study.

 

New FBI data show an uptick in reported hate crimes. Nationwide, 2016 saw more than 6,100 incidents, up by more than 270 from  the year before. Georgia reported a drop in hate crimes during that period. But a recent ProPublica investigation finds many police departments, including those in Georgia, aren’t trained to identify and investigate hate crimes. This could lead to underreporting. We talk with ProPublica’s A.C. Thompson.

Georgia Rep. Price Says HIV Comments Taken Out Of Context

Oct 23, 2017
house.ga.gov

Georgia Rep. Betty Price says her comments on people with HIV that ignited a national firestorm were "taken completely out of context."

Price, the wife of former U.S. Health Secretary Tom Price, was in a legislative committee meeting Tuesday when she asked a state health official whether people with HIV could legally be quarantined.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports Price said Saturday that she was just being "provocative."

On Second Thought For Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Jul 18, 2017

Federal prosecutors are investigating bribes paid to Atlanta city officials in exchange for business contracts. Two contractors have already plead guilty to dishing out these bribes--though it is not clear who accepted them. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has exclusive new info on the situation. We talk with reporter Scott Trubey, who has been covering the bribery scandal at City Hall.

Then, Kaleb Anderson is a 19 year-old-from Atlanta. He was diagnosed with HIV just a couple of months before starting college. He shares his story in a commentary.

Billy Howard

Atlanta is the fifth-highest metro area for new HIV diagnoses, according to federal dataA collection at Emory University sheds light on the HIV/AIDS crisis of the 1980s by showcasing photos by Atlanta photographer Billy Howard.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Atlanta is the fifth highest metro area for rates of new HIV diagnoses, but recent data shows annual infection rates in the state are dropping, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Matt Terrell

If you live in the South, you are more likely to be diagnosed with HIV.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says one in 51 Georgians will contract the virus in their lifetime.

Atlanta is considered to have a "concentrated HIV epidemic," largely due to poverty and high-risk behaviors such as injectable drug use.

A new public art exhibition opening Valentine's Day at Centennial Olympic Park illustrates Atlanta's growing HIV infection rate.

It's called "Atlanta's HIV+ Population Now."

Google Images

The HIV/AIDS epidemic in the U.S. isn’t the crisis it was in the 1980s and 1990s. Testing and treatment options have improved, but people are still dying. And the Atlanta metro area has one of the highest rates in the nation for new diagnoses. Producer Sean Powers explains why.

Billy Howard

Atlanta is the fifth-highest metro area for new HIV diagnoses, according to federal dataA collection at Emory University sheds light on the HIV/AIDS crisis of the 1980s by showcasing photos by Atlanta photographer Billy Howard.

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