HIgher education

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As students head back to college this month, a large portion will be taking on loans to help cover costs.

At least 1.5 million Georgians — approximately 14% of the state's population — have some amount of student loan debt, totaling to $58.7 billion.

A key consideration for prospective students is the difference between the advertised price of tuition and the actual net price of attending a higher education institution.

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The University of Tennessee is making a big promise: Starting in 2020, the system will offer free tuition to qualifying low-income students enrolling at its Knoxville, Chattanooga and Martin campuses.

The program, called UT Promise, is the first of its kind among public universities in the South. UT Interim President Randy Boyd, a first-generation college graduate himself, is the architect of the program. Boyd joined On Second Thought from WUOT in Knoxville to explain why Tennessee is making this promise, how the university will fund it and how other Southern states could follow suit. 


University of Georgia
University Of Georgia

Women's educational opportunities in the 19th Century were few and far between. Finishing schools focused on women's socialization and skills like art, music and French, rather than a rigorous academic curriculum.

 

The Lucy Cobb Institute in Athens aimed to change that. It opened in 1859 and taught women finishing school skills alongside math and science classes. The institute cemented Athens as a place for women's education in the South.

 


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One-third of today's college students are the first in their families to enroll in college, according to the U.S. Department of Education. But first-generation college students often encounter greater financial hardship, overwhelmingly bureaucratic paperwork and the difficulty of navigating an environment with which they perhaps don't have much familiarity.


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For the last five years, Georgia State University has awarded more bachelor's degrees to African-Americans than any other nonprofit college or university in the country. Serving more than 30,000 students — GSU became the state's largest university in 2015, when it merged with Georgia Perimeter College — the university has also brought up its graduation rate by more than 20 percent since 2003. So how did GSU get to be a paragon of personalizing education for all students? 


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Georgia has the nation’s third largest rural school population, but less than 30 percent of those students attend a big college or university. Part of the explanation is that students from rural areas are more likely to come from low-income households, and transitioning from a small town to a big city can both be daunting and financially nerve-racking for students thinking about college.


 

How To Manage Your Student Loans

May 16, 2018
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As students prepare for college, they have a big concern: the cost.

 

The Institute for Higher Education Policy finds 70 percent of colleges unaffordable for lower-income and middle-income students. That’s if they don’t take out a student loans.