healthcare

In this Friday, Jan. 24, 2014 photo, a worker is seen behind the registration window of the emergency room at Grady Memorial Hospital, in Atlanta. In two years, federal payments to hospitals treating a large share of the nation's poor will begin to evapor
David Goldman / AP Photo

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, an in-depth look at rural health care in Georgia.

Courtesy of American Academy of Pediatrics

Fayetteville pediatrician Dr. Sara Goza has been elected president of the American Academy of Pediatrics. 

Goza is back at her practice in Georgia after visiting the U.S.-Mexico border, and examining detention facilities where migrant children are held. She joined On Second Thought to tell us what she saw there.


Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger during an election commisison meeting in Macon. On Wednesday, Raffensperger annonuced Georgia will hold its presidential primary on March 24, 2020.
Stephen Fowler / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, President Donald Trump's internal polls show him behind in Georgia, Florida and other key states. His campaign rally in Orlando gave the audience a glimpse of the themes on which he will run.


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Earlier in June, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported that 17,000 poor, elderly or disabled Georgians had lost their Medicaid benefits. The Georgia Department of Community Health said their accounts were terminated for not responding to renewal notices. Now, the AJC reports state officials have revealed the full number of people slated to lose Medicaid is closer to 30,000.

Courtesy of SIRUM / Good Pill Pharmacy

From waiting rooms across the country to the floor of the U.S. Capitol, healthcare is one of the biggest issues for American voters.

One of the main challenges in Georgia is access to doctors and pharmacies alike, especially in rural parts of the state. And then there's cost of care. According to the Commonwealth Fund, a quarter of Americans report not filling prescriptions they cannot afford.

 


Starland Family Practice

Finding a doctor can be especially difficult in many Georgia counties. For LGBTQ patients, it can be even worse. A first-of-its-kind clinic in Savannah is working to ease that difficulty.

As a part of LGBTQ Pride Month, On Second Thought checked in with the Starland Family Practice, a routine family medical office with a focus on LGBTQ patients, celebrating its one-year anniversary.


U.S. Rep. Buddy Carter, a Republican who represents Georgia’s 1st Congressional District spoke at the 2019 Rx Drug Abuse & Heroin Summit in Atlanta.
Robert Jimison / GPB

U.S. Congressman Earl "Buddy" Carter represents a large part of Georgia's coast. Some of the counties in his district are among the hardest hit in the state by the opioid crisis. Carter is also the only pharmacist currently serving in Congress. 


Courtesy of SIRUM / Good Pill Pharmacy

From waiting rooms across the country to the floor of the U.S. Capitol, healthcare is one of the biggest issues for American voters.

One of the main challenges in Georgia is access to doctors and pharmacies alike, especially in rural parts of the state. And then there's cost of care. According to the Commonwealth Fund, a quarter of Americans report not filling prescriptions they cannot afford.


Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp
(AP Photo/John Bazemore)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Gov. Kemp has signed into law his signature issue of the 2019 legislative session. Kemp now has the power to set the course for expansion of Medicaid and to determine possible subsidies for Georgians who buy insurance through Obamacare. We look at the political implications for Kemp’s victory.

 


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According to the American Immigration Council, about 25 percent of the nearly one million physicians who practice medicine in the United States were trained in foreign medical schools. In Georgia, about 17 percent of doctors were born in another country, but they face high barriers to entry into the U.S.

 

That could be a cause for concern in states like Georgia, which has a severe shortage of physicians. The problem is especially pronounced in rural areas. Nearly a third of Georgia counties don't have a pediatrican. Six have no doctor at all. In places like Houston County, doctors from India have revitalized the landscape of medical care.

 

 


Yuri Kageyama / AP/File

Healthcare is top of mind for many voters in the midterm election. GPB's Emily Jones talked with Andy Miller of Georgia Health News about how it factors into the Georgia governor's race.


Patrick Sison / AP/File

On this edition of Political Rewind, healthcare has become one of the hottest issues on the campaign trail during the 2018 Midterm Election. In the race for governor, Stacey Abrams and Brian Kemp continue to duel over the expansion of Medicaid.

 

Access Reproductive Care Southeast

In stark contrast to conservative billboards promoting pro-life ideals, an organization called Access Reproductive Care Southeast has posted its own abortion messaging on billboards across Georgia.

The phrase, “Abortion is Healthcare & Reproductive Justice is Unconditional Love. Trust your loved ones to make decisions about their bodies” will appear on billboards from Atlanta to Savannah, ARC Executive Director Oriaku Njoku said.

“When folks are traveling an hour and a half to two hours to get to an abortion appointment because 96 percent of Georgians live in a county without an abortion provider, we want people to be met with that message of love,” Njoku said.

Alex Brandon / AP/File

Many Georgia women are left unprotected when it comes to their pregnancies and their babies' lives, according to a report released this week by the March Of Dimes.

The nonprofit's president, Stacey Stewart, said lack of accessible maternity care constitutes a "real health crisis" nationwide.


Onlinemediarelease/Flickr

Georgia has the seventh highest rate of uninsured children in the country. The problem is especially severe in low-income communities. The report from Voices of Georgia's Children shows 80 percent of Georgia children who were eligible for medicaid or Peachcare in 2016 weren't enrolled.

Better Living Through Acknowledging Death

Sep 4, 2018
Grant Blankenship / GPB

One by one, their names were recited as family members clutched one another’s hands and silently wept.

Seventeen men and women had died within the past year at Gray Health & Rehabilitation, a 58-bed nursing home in the city of Gray. Today, their lives were being honored and the losses experienced by those who cared for them recognized.

Grant Blankenship / GPB News

A while back, Jimmy Carter needed a doctor.

Not just for himself, but for everyone in his hometown of Plains, Georgia. The town’s single doctor had folded up shop a while back. Luckily for Carter, he served on the board of Mercer University, which has a medical school.

Turns out, all Carter had to do to get another doctor was ask. The upshot is that his asking may lead to big things for rural healthcare around the state. 

A worker is seen behind the registration window of the emergency room at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta.
(AP Photo/David Goldman)

On this edition of Political Rewind, we take a broad look at healthcare in Georgia. After multiple attempts, Congress has failed to shut down The Affordable Care Act, but President Donald Trump is eliminating a number of key provisions through executive orders. What’s the likely impact on Georgians of ending the individual mandate?


Ilmicrofono Oggiono / Flickr

In the majority of Georgia families, mothers are the sole, primary or co-breadwinners, according to the Center for American Progress. But that doesn't mean they have the wages to adequately support themselves and their loved ones — particularly when it comes to minimum wage workers in Georgia, of whom 6 in 10 are women. And beyond the wage and wealth gap, women lack access to other things that Shilpa Phadke says are critical for their economic security: affordable child care, harassment-free work environments and quality health care. 


Ildar Sagdejev / Wikimedia Commons

The Georgia 2018 legislative session recently legalized the use of cannabis oil for treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. PTSD affects about 31 million people in the United States. The disorder is often associated with veterans, but another group of heroes — first responders — also struggle with the disorder. According to one survey, one in 15 paramedics and EMTs has attempted suicide. 


Pixabay

The South has a lot of nicknames. "The Bible Belt." "Dixieland." And when it comes to health, we're known as the Stroke Belt.

 

Studies say stroke risk in this 11-state region, which includes Georgia, is 34 percent higher for the general population than elsewhere in the United States.

 

Jessica Gurell / GPB

Dr. James Black wants opiate drug seekers to know not to look in his emergency room.

“You know, we're not going to be easy prey, so to speak, for people with repeated usage,” Black said. Black is the director of emergency medicine at the Phobe Putney Medical Center in Albany.

In the context of national trends, Southwest Georgia doesn’t have it as bad as other places. Opiate use is in decline here, but Black said he has seen his fair share of overdoses.

On Second Thought For Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Jun 28, 2017

First, President Trump recently unveiled new trade restrictions with Cuba. We look at how this will impact Georgia’s poultry industry. Joining us is James Sumner, President of the USA Poultry & Egg Export Council and Marisa Anne Pagnattaro, Associate Dean for UGA’s Terry College of Business.

AID Atlanta, the state’s largest HIV/AIDS service organization, has filed a lawsuit against the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

 

The group claims the federal agency’s decision to defund it threatens the delivery of services to the communities most at risk of getting the deadly virus: young, black, gay and bisexual men.

We sit down with Nicole Roebuck, the executive director of AID Atlanta, to talk about the lawsuit, infection rates in Atlanta, and lingering stigmas associated with the virus.

As promised, President Trump got to work on Day One, spending some time in the Oval Office in between the inaugural parade and a trio of formal balls.

Trump signed an executive order Friday night directing government agencies to "ease the burdens" of Obamacare while the new administration and Congress work toward repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act.

White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus presented Trump with the order, which he described as: "An executive order minimizing the economic burden of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act pending repeal."

If you think that you wouldn't be touched by a Republican overhaul of Obamacare because you get health insurance through your job at a big company, think again.

Several of the law's provisions apply to plans offered by large employers, too (with some exceptions for plans that were in place before the law passed in March 2010).

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A partial repeal of Obamacare could leave 18 million people who have insurance today with no coverage one year later, according to an analysis by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office.

The report estimates that 32 million people would lose their insurance over 10 years.

Before Luke Whitbeck began taking a $300,000-a-year drug, the 2-year-old's health was inexplicably failing.

A pale boy with enormous eyes, Luke frequently ran high fevers, tired easily and was skinny all over, except his belly stuck out like a bowling ball.

"What does your medicine do for you?" Luke's mother, Meg, asked after his weekly drug treatment recently.

President-elect Donald Trump said he's finishing a plan to replace the Affordable Care Act with a proposal that would provide "insurance for everybody," according to a report by The Washington Post.

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