Hate Crimes

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

A coalition of groups under the moniker of “Hate Free Georgia” is renewing calls for Georgia to pass a hate crimes bill when the legislature returns in January. 

At a press conference Friday, speakers from the Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights (GLAHR), Georgia Association of Latino Elected Officials (GALEO), the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) and others urged the state Senate to pass House Bill 426 in next year’s session.

Georgia is one of five states without a hate crimes law.


Courtesy Alex Williamson / Teaching Tolerance

Grade school teachers reported more than 3,000 hate incidents in schools during the fall 2018 semester, a new survey from the Southern Poverty Law Center's Teaching Tolerance program has found. Those incidents, however, often went undisciplined by school leaders – and less than a third made it into the news.

Teaching Tolerance Director Maureen Costello joined On Second Thought on the line from Montgomery, Alabama, to share more of the report's findings. 


Georgia is one of five states without a hate crimes law on the books; however, legislation proposed last week could change that.  Sponsored by State Rep. Chuck Efstration, a Gwinnett Republican, House Bill 426 would introduce enhanced penalties for hate crimes if signed into law. According to the most recent data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation, 27 such crimes were reported in 2017. 

 A similar bill didn’t make it out of committee last year, despite wide support from law enforcement. We spoke with that bill's sponsor, former State Rep. Meagan Hanson, about why that legislation was a priority for her. Rachel Glickhouse, partner manager for ProPublica's Documenting Hate project, also joined the conversation. 


Georgia is one of five states without a hate crimes law on the books; however, legislation proposed last week could change that.  Sponsored by State Rep. Chuck Efstration, a Gwinnett Republican, House Bill 426 would introduce enhanced penalties for hate crimes if signed into law. According to the most recent data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation, 27 such crimes were reported in 2017. 


  • New Hate Crime Law
  • Winter Storm Update
  • Hospitals Hit With Medicare Penalty

A state representative from metro Atlanta is spearheading a bill that would create hate crime legislation in Georgia.

Meagan Hanson, a Republican from Brookhaven, announced the bill this morning at the state capitol.

“With this legislation, Georgia will join the vast majority of states in this country prosecuting crimes motivated by hate with the intent to threaten groups of our citizens with the gravity and attention they deserve,” Hanson said during a press conferenc

New FBI data show an uptick in reported hate crimes. Nationwide, 2016 saw more than 6,100 incidents, up by more than 270 from  the year before. Georgia reported a drop in hate crimes during that period. But a recent ProPublica investigation finds many police departments, including those in Georgia, aren’t trained to identify and investigate hate crimes. This could lead to underreporting. We talk with ProPublica’s A.C. Thompson.

Diana Robinson / flickr

According to new FBI data released last month, there were more than 6,100 reported hate crimes in 2016, up by more than 270 from the year before. Georgia reported a drop in hate crimes during that period.

Slaying That Haunted Family For Decades Now Linked To Racism

Nov 6, 2017
Courtesy of Heather Coggins via AP

When 23-year-old Timothy Coggins was found dead and disfigured beside a Georgia highway in 1983, the young black man's family and neighbors whispered that his killing may be linked to racism.

Is Organized White Supremacy On The Rise?

Apr 6, 2017

We’ve seen more acts of hate speech and racism in recent months. Are hate groups becoming more organized? Jeannine Bell, Professor of Law at Indiana University, and filmmaker Mike Ramsdell joined us to discuss the rise of white supremacy, and what we’ve learned from dealing with hate groups in our history.

 

Prison For 2 Who Threatened Violence At Black Child's Party

Feb 27, 2017
Douglas County Sheriff’s Office

A Georgia judge sentenced two people to lengthy prison terms for their role in the disruption of a black child's birthday party with Confederate flags, racial slurs and armed threats.

Jose Ismael Torres, 26, will spend 13 years in prison; Kayla Rae Norton, 25, is to serve six years, Atlanta news outlets report.

Both wept as the sentences were handed down Monday in Douglas County, west of Atlanta.

"Their actions were motivated by racial hatred," said Superior Court Judge William McClain.

Hate crimes in 2015 were more than 6 percent more frequent than they were in 2014, with a two-thirds increase in religiously motivated attacks against Muslims.

The FBI's Hate Crimes Statistics, 2015 report tallied more than 5,850 hate crime incidents in 2015.

Most of the crimes were intimidation, vandalism or assault.

Most of those — 56.9 percent — were racially motivated, with more than half of race-based attacks targeting African-Americans.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RAY SUAREZ, HOST:

The Kelmans-Seymour conjecture has puzzled the mathematicians for nearly 40 years. Now, a team from Georgia Tech believes they have finally cracked the decades-old problem. We speak with Georgia Tech Mathematics Professor Xingxing Yu and graduate student Dawei He about how they came up with the proof to this math mystery.