graduation

Kim Dennis

Create Your Dreams, or CYD, is an after school program that provides long-term youth development, and is dedicated to helping students in underserved communities of Atlanta's Westside neighborhoods.

That means resources, opportunities and — perhaps most importantly — relationships that help these young Atlantans grow and succeed. This Friday, the organization celebrates its 25th anniversary

Philanthropist Robert F. Smith speaking at the Morehouse College 2019 commencement ceremony in Atlanta, Ga.
Morehouse College

Graduating seniors at Morehouse College received a surprise gift from billionaire philanthropist Robert Smith who announced he would provide a grant to pay off the sum of student loan debt for the class of 2019. 


U.S. Rep. John Lewis will deliver the commencement address at Emory University's Oxford College.
Michael Dwyer / AP Photo

As spring comes to an end, graduation ceremonies quickly approach and commencement speakers are tasked with inspiring graduates as they enter the workforce. This year, Georgia’s colleges and universities will host notable speakers from across the nation, including Daymond John, Sally Yates, John Lewis, Andrew Young and Deborah Roberts.

Mary Frances Early UGA Black African-American Graduate
University of Georgia / Twitter

The first class of women graduated from the University of Georgia in 1918, one hundred years ago. Their resiliency changed higher education, but they were segregated.

 

UGA admitted the first black woman, Charlayne Hunter-Gault, in 1961. She inspired Mary Frances Early to attend the school a year later, and Early became the first black UGA graduate. She graduated in 1962 with a master's degree in music education.

 

We spoke to her about the barriers she faced in admission, the isolation of being the only black student on campus, and the way her legacy inspires students today.

 


Stephen Fowler | GPB News

In this afternoon Latin class at Cristo Rey Atlanta’s downtown building, 20 uniformed teenagers recite words illuminated on the wall by an overhead projector.

But it’s no ordinary Catholic school.

Cristo Rey Atlanta is one of a network of 32 Catholic schools nationwide that only accept students living below the poverty line.

  

Tampa Bay Mizzou

UGA has a great football team this year. They’re ranked number seven in the nation, after a spell in first. But it’s not all good news. UGA ranks dead last in the Southeastern Conference when it comes to  graduation success rates for student athletes – all while the university’s overall student graduation rates are way up. Eric Kelderman is Senior Reporter for the Chronicle of Higher Education. Also with us is Professor of Sports Journalism at UGA, Vicki Michaelis.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

 

They say you can’t go home again. So maybe you should take a good long look before you leave?

That’s what seniors from Northside High School in Warner Robins did recently when they took a field trip to their old elementary and middle schools.

At Westside Elementary, students lined the halls to see the graduates. When Northside students walked in wearing their blue caps and gowns, students and teachers erupted.  At the head of the line is Alexis Monroy. This was her school.

Andrew Schwegler

It's high school graduation season. That means there are a lot of proud parents across Georgia this week. And some of them are also hurting for cash after senior year fees cleared the bank. It can be expensive to be a high school senior these days – from graduation robe rental to yearbooks to class trips. So when does a free education stop being free? 

We talk about the price of earning a diploma these days with Patricia Seaman, senior director of the National Endowment for Financial Education, and counselor Dawn Mann of Harrison High School in Cobb County.