GPS

Every day, millions of Americans use -and often rely on- GPS technology to help them navigate their commutes and get precise directions to their destinations. As Americans celebrate the upcoming 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, they can thank the work of a Princeton University graduate, Todd Jaegar, who conceived and developed the Apollo 11 experiment that enabled GPS technology to take a “giant leap” forward.

Meet a hidden figure named Vicky Graves, who worked for NACA, the predecessor to NASA. 


Neil Armstrong / AP

The Apollo 11 rocket NASA that launched into space 50 years ago this week was also the blast-off point for things now commonly used on Earth. The first moonwalk created the foundations for technology that moves people and products around every day. 

The lunar laser retroreflector used by astronaut Buzz Aldrin was critical to developing global positioning systems or GPS. Todd Jaegar is global director of commercial optics for Haraeus, which helped produce the reflector. Jaegar visited On Second Thought from Haraeus' quartz glass facility in Buford.