Governor Brian Kemp

Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Georgia is currently ranked third among states with most uninsured residents.  More than 1.4 million Georgians were without insurance in 2018.

Governor Kemp announced the second of two healthcare waiver proposals to increase coverage on Monday. If approved, the waivers will allow the state of Georgia to remain compliant with the Federal Affordable Care Act — making changes to the health insurance market in the state without expanding Medicaid.

Georgia is currently one of 14 states that have chosen to not fully expand Medicaid.


Stephen Fowler / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgians will get a chance to weigh in on Gov. Brian Kemp’s health care waivers. Kemp’s proposals would give more authority to the state for health insurance powers that are now held by the federal government. Where do Georgians stand on the state government’s role in health care coverage?

 


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On this edition of Political Rewind, Democratic presidential candidates are dueling over a variety of proposals for improving delivery. We’ve heard them tout their various plans for Medicare for All or a public option to Obamacare, all while promoting “universal health care.”

What do these terms really mean and how would they be paid for? Our panel explores the health care debate’s terms and explains the proposals.

 


Stephen Fowler

It's been about 10 months since Gov. Brian Kemp took office — with a pledge to lift up rural Georgia. 

Now, he has launched a Rural Strike Team, designed to boost economic development across the state. And he's embarked on a "Georgia Made" tour to highlight local companies and their successes. 


The list of officer-involved deaths is long, and have revived questions about law enforcement reform.  On Second Thought spoke with Civil Rights Attorney, Chris Stewart, and former DeKalb County Director of Public Safety, Cedric Alexander, to discuss why these incidents continue to take place and what efforts are being take to reform the system.


Seth Perlman / AP

A federal judge last week blocked an Obama-era rule governing what bodies of water are subject to the Clean Water Act.

 

The Obama administration rule said the Clean Water Act applies to streams and ponds that are sometimes dry and other bodies of water far upstream from navigable waterways. Farmers, developers and other landowners called that federal overreach. Ten states including Georgia challenged the rule.