government shutdown

Tyrone Brooks, a veteran civil rights activist, stands behind the tombstone of Mae Murray Dorsey who was killed in a 1946 lynching by a white mob in Monroe, Ga., Thursday, Feb. 22, 2018.
David Goldman / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, was former Gov. Eugene Talmadge complicit in the unsolved lynchings in 1946? We’ll soon know more now that a federal judge has ordered the opening of grand jury proceedings of the case.


Kenny Leon's True Colors Theatre Company

Auto company General Motors recently announced it is shutting down production at five plants across North America, leaving thousands of workers without jobs. These real-world events are mirrored in the Atlanta production of "Skeleton Crew." The play follows a tight-knit group of workers at the only auto stamping plant left in Detroit at the height of the Great Recession.

 

Director of "Skeleton Crew" Jamil Jude visited "On Second Thought" to discuss the play. He's also the new artistic director for Kenny Leon's True Colors Theatre Company. Jude shared how the play's themes around unionizing, sacrifice and job insecurity resonate with audiences today.

 

 

President Donald Trump announced a deal to temporarily reopen the government, in the Rose Garden of the White House.
The White House

On this edition of Political Rewind, after two bills failed to break the standoff between Republicans and Democrats, President Donald Trump announced a deal to temporarily reopen all the agencies of the federal government.


Left: Sen. David Perdue, R-GA., Right: Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-GA.
Alex Brandon / AP Photo

The United States Senate on Thursday voted on two measures that would push forward efforts to reopen the government. Sen. Johnny Isakson broke from his GOP colleagues when he voted for both the Republican and Democratic proposal while Sen. David Perdue voted in support of President Donald Trump’s proposal to reopen the government.

U.S. Coast Guard boat in front of the Statue of Liberty
(Cristo Vlahos, Wikimedia Commons)

The commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard had this message for U.S. Coast Guard members affected by the partial government shutdown Tuesday night:

“Ultimately, I find it unacceptable that coast guard men and women have to rely on food pantries and donations to get through day to day life as service members," said Admiral Karl Schultz.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

As the government shutdown stretches on, federal workers in rural Georgia are starting to feel the bite of hunger.

The asphalt behind the loading dock of the Second Harvest of South Georgia food bank in Valdosta rattled the wheels of a shopping cart loaded with food for three transportation safety administration employees from the local airport Thursday morning.


MaxPixel

  • Atlanta Exploring Options To Pay TSA Workers
  • Kemp Pushing Budget Proposals At Capital
  • NAACP Calls Out Legislator For Supporting Racist Institutions And White Supremacy

David Goldman / AP

The city of Atlanta is looking at a way to pay TSA employees ahead of Super Bowl 53.

Speaking Wednesday on WBUR’s "Here and Now," Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms said the city is working with a credit union and corporate partners to provide loans to TSA agents as many of them are asked to work without pay. 

A Transportation Security Administration employee checks an air traveler's identification at Hartsfield Jackson Atlanta International Airport Monday, Jan. 7, 2019, in Atlanta.
John Bazemore / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, as legislators continue budget hearings at the state capitol, attention has shifted to spending priorities for the coming year.


Ric Feld / AP Photo/File

The percentage of TSA airport screeners missing work has hit 10 percent as the partial government shutdown stretches into its fifth week.

The Transportation Security Administration said Monday that Sunday's absence rate compared to 3.1 percent on the comparable Sunday a year ago.

Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Today on Political Rewind, Gov. Brian Kemp begins laying out his agenda for his first session of the General Assembly. Flexibility for using medicaid dollars, teacher raises and school safety are among his top priorities. We’ll look at the details of his plan as well as how democrats are responding. 

Birth Home of Martin Luther King, Jr in Atlanta.
Gary Tarleton / NPS, HFC

As the hometown of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. prepares to observe the civil rights leaders birthday, a private company is stepping in to make sure that those who wish to visit his home, closed during the shutdown, can do so.


Gerry Broome / AP Photo/File

As the government shutdown stretches on, it may begin to affect how communities are able to help victims of sexual assault.

The $3.2 billion the Department of Justice sets aside via its Office of Victim Advocacy includes the largest single source of money for supporting women who have been victims of sexual assault. However, when the last of the money funding federal government programs gets spent this week, managers of Office of Victim Advocacy funds will be idled.


On this edition of Political Rewind, flyers at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport are starting to feel the painful impact of the federal government shutdown. As TSA workers call in sick, security lines are growing to intolerable lengths.


Grant Blankenship / GPB News

With 136,911 federal workers in the state, Georgia residents are more affected by the partial government shutdown than the nation’s capital, according to The National Treasury Employees Union.

The state is also home to the largest airport in the world, and more than a quarter of those federal employees work for the Transportation Security Administration. Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms recently tweeted the number of TSA workers is just shy of 30,000.

Dave Goldman / AP Photo/File

The government shutdown has shuttered popular Atlanta tourist attractions tied to the life of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., but the shutdown won't derail 10 days of events leading up to Jan. 21 — the federal holiday honoring the late civil rights leader.

President Donald Trump salutes as he steps off Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House, Sunday, Jan. 6, 2019, in Washington. Trump is returning from a trip to Camp David.
Alex Brandon / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, leaders at the state capitol are beginning to write the budget for the coming fiscal year. But how could signs of a possible economic downturn affect their spending plans? Our panel looks at the challenge.


Brian Kemp, center, walks with President Donald Trump, right, and Sen. David Perdue (R-Ga) as Trump arrives for a rally in Macon.
John Bazemore / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Brian Kemp is getting set for a pre-inaugural campaign-style swing across Georgia. Can we learn anything about how he may govern based on where he’s heading?


Left: Jackie Speier in Feb. 1979 after she survived being shot 5 times and left for dead on the tarmac in Guyana. Right: Jackie Speier smiles after voting in a special election in 2008.
SAL VEDER/PAUL SAKUMA / AP Photo

Jackie Speier, U.S. Representative from California (D-14), was 28 years old when she accompanied her boss, California Congressman Leo Ryan, on a fact-finding mission to Guyana. 


  • 17 Bills Pre-Filed Ahead Of Jan. 14 Legislative Session Opening
  • Federal Government Shutdown Affects Georgia
  • 8000 Georgians Ticketed For Cell Phone Use While Driving in 2018

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia’s senior United State Senator Johnny Isakson joins us just hours after the White House authorized release of the controversial memo purporting to show political bias in the FBI investigation of collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign.  We ask Isakson for his thoughts.  Plus, where does he stand on a compromise to protect DACA immigrants and build Trump’s wall, and what about another looming government shutdown next week?

Panelists:

AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway

(AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

On this edition of Political Rewind guest hosted by Rickey Bevington, we break down the compromise between Republicans and Democrats to end the government shutdown, and the anger that many Democrats are expressing towards Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer for his negotiations with Mitch McConnell.  We’re also talking about how the shutdown has impacted Georgia and how things could be worse for the state if another shutdown happens in three weeks.  Also, Atlanta has made the shortlist for Amazon’s second headquarters, but what will

Government Shutdown Impact In Georgia

7 More Georgians Die From The Flu

Atlanta United Big Signing

Updated at 6:17 p.m. ET

Congress has voted to avert a partial government shutdown that could have come Friday night.

Updated at 12:30 p.m. ET

The Republican chairmen of the House and Senate Appropriations committees have endorsed the idea of a short-term spending bill to keep the government open while budget negotiations continue.

The stop-gap spending measure, introduced by House Appropriations Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen of New Jersey, would put off the deadline to May 5.

With just two days left to stop a partial shutdown of the federal government, the Trump administration on Wednesday removed another major sticking point in the spending bill negotiations.

The White House told lawmakers it will not cut off federal subsidies that help low-income Americans pay for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, at least for now, an administration official and congressional sources confirm to NPR.

Democrats sought to have the federal payment — known as a cost-sharing reduction, or CSR — included in the spending package.