Golden Ray

St. Simons Sound Incident Response Unified Command Joint Information Center

A salvage company suing to halt removal of a capsized cargo ship along the Georgia coast appears to be backing off claims that sawing the vessel into huge chunks would threaten the environment.

Officials from the salvage firm Donjon-SMIT acknowledged Tuesday in U.S. District Court that they would be willing to dismantle the ship using the same method their lawsuit condemns.

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St. Simons Sound Incident Response Unified Command Joint Information Center

A former contractor working to remove a capsized ship from the St. Simons Sound is suing the Coast Guard, alleging violations of federal law and predicting a possible "environmental disaster."


Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class James Himes / St Simons Sound Incident Response Joint Information Center

There is now a plan in place to remove the capsized cargo ship that has been in St. Simon’s Sound since September.

 

The Army Corps of Engineers Tuesday issued permits for the construction of an Environmental Protection Barrier around the ship, the Golden Ray. It’s designed to contain pollution and debris. Then, a floating crane will cut through the hull and remove the ship piece by piece.

 

Petty Officer First Class Nate Littlejohn said they hope to remove the entire ship before hurricane season in June.

St. Simons Sound Incident Unified Command Joint Information Center

The Georgia Water Coalition’s annual “Dirty Dozen” list was released Thursday. It highlights serious pollution threats to waterways across the state.


AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton

The capsized cargo ship the Golden Ray is still trapped in St. Simon Sound. The process of removing the ship is so complex it could take months or even a year.


St. Simons Sound Incident Unified Command Joint Information Center

Crews on the Georgia coast this week placed rocks along the hull of the Golden Ray, the capsized container ship in the St. Simons sound. It’s an effort to keep the ship stable.


St. Simons Sound Incident Unified Command Joint Information Center

The capsized cargo ship Golden Ray is still trapped in St. Simons Sound. And, while trapped, it has repeatedly leaked oil. Teams of scientists are working to trace the oil and limit its impact on the delicate marsh ecosystem. But there could be disagreement about just how far the oil is spreading.


  

Marine salvage experts are trying to determine what caused a fire, Sunday, Oct. 20, in the overturned cargo ship lying close to Georgia's seacoast.
Stephen B. Morton / AP

State officials say they may never know what caused smoke to come out of the overturned cargo ship that has been immobilized in the St. Simons Sound for more than a month.

Marine workers noticed clouds of white smoke coming from the Golden Ray vessel Sunday morning.

Altamaha Riverkeeper

There is definitely oil in the marshes near St. Simon’s island where a shipping vessel capsized this month.

That’s the conclusion of University of Georgia Marine Scientist Mandy Joye and others who sampled the marshes last week.

Altamaha Riverkeeper

More than a week after a cargo ship capsized in the St. Simons Sound on the Georgia coast, oil is being found on grasses in nearby marshes. The first oil was discovered earlier in the week by the Altamaha Riverkeeper. It comes in with each new tide and looks similar to rings on a tree.