Georgia Power

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One of Georgia's largest utility companies is offering special programs for people who may be struggling to pay their power bill.

Georgia Power is partnering with the Salvation Army and the Division of Family and Children Services to help qualifying, low-income households pay their energy bills.


Sue Sapp / U. S. Air Force

As many Georgians prepare to work and study from home as schools and offices close to prevent the spread of coronavirus, several companies are taking steps to make sure people are not left without the basics.

As of Saturday, Georgia Power will not disconnect residential customers who cannot pay their bill for the next 30 days.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

It was late on a rainy night when Fletcher Sams of the Altamaha Riverkeeper guided his truck down a long muddy road to Ken and Dorothy Krakow’s home on the banks of the Ocmulgee River. With him in a notebook were the results of their well testing. 

He laid out the bad news on their kitchen table after digging through his notebook with data from over 60 other homes.   

“It is tied at the very highest for the worst,” he said. 

Dorothy Krakow buried her face in her hands at the news. Ken Krakow cracked a joke.  

“Yeah. Wow. Congratulations to us,” he said. “What’s going on?”

 


Grant Blankenship / GPB

A Georgia bill relating to coal ash management that fizzled last year has now passed out of committee.    

 

Grant Blankenship / GPB News

Gloria Hammond remembers the day the man from Georgia Power came to talk about buying the home she shared with her husband Cason.  They were just back from the hospital. The man gone no farther than the front yard.

 

“I said, ‘Look, I'm telling you right now, we're not selling nothing right now,’” Hammond said. “Because I already knew Cason was terminal.”

By terminal she meant Cason was already sick with the cancer that eventually took his life. By then, most everyone else up and down Luther Smith Road in Juliette had already sold out to the utility. 

 


Grant Blankenship / GPB

When trash leaves your house and goes to the landfill, that landfill has features in place that keep liquids from the trash from getting into groundwater. Right now, those features are not required for Georgia landfills that store the toxic coal ash from power plants.

A bill filed this week in the Georgia Legislature would bring coal ash storage rules in line with the rules for your household garbage.

Time To Move For Neighbors As Robins AFB Goes Big On Solar

Dec 23, 2019
Liz Fabian / Center for Collaborative Journalism

Robins Air Force Base in south Macon is about to go in for solar power in a big way.

That means many people have had to sell their homes and move to make room. But not everyone is ready to move. Ronald and Kristine Snyder moved from the Robins Air Force Base encroachment zone in the '90s and they vowed not to uproot themselves again.

“We’re too old to move and start over,” Ronald Snyder said Wednesday, just hours after the Central Georgia Joint Development Authority got an update on the 650-acre solar farm that Georgia Power is building north of the base.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Starting next year, Georgia Power customers will see an average increase of  $6 a month on their power bills.

That’s just one of a couple of increases expected to be phased in over the next three years. State Public Service commissioners approved the rate hikes for Georgia Power on Tuesday.


Anirudh Bala / Wikimedia Commons

Tuesday on Political Rewind, the Public Service Commission approved a rate hike request today from Georgia Power, but it was not as much money as the utility originally asked for. PSC Vice-chair Tim Echols takes us through their decision-making.

 


SARAH ROSE / GPBNEWS

The Public Service Commission on Monday began public hearings on a proposed rate hike by Georgia Power. If approved, it would raise monthly service fees by nearly 80%. 


Brendan Wood / Flickr

This week, Georgia's Public Service Commission will begin a new round of hearings in Atlanta on a proposed rate hike for Georgia Power customers.

 

The average user would pay an extra $200 dollars annually under the potential rate increase.

 


Google Streetview of First Iconium Baptist Church

Community members and activists came together Monday night in Atlanta to speak out against Georgia Power’s proposed rate hike. The increase, set for 2020, would raise rates by about $10 for a typical residence.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

When coal-fired power plants burn coal, what’s left over is a toxic ash mixed with water that gets stored in ash ponds. They look pretty much like you’d imagine – huge, contained pools of slurry and particulates – and environmentalists worry about their potential effects on the ecosystem and drinking water.

Georgia Power is on track to quit adding to its ash ponds by sometime next year.  That’s a mandate in the Integrated Resources Plan the Georgia Public Service Commission approved this summer. 


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The Georgia Public Service Commission has approved the latest three-year plan for Georgia Power's energy mix. The Integrated Resource Plan, or IRP, was discussed Tuesday morning.

The utility giant will add 2,210 megawatts of renewable power procurement, the largest increase in Georgia's history. Most of that amount will be in large-scale solar power. By the end of the year, the state could have about 2,400 megawatts of renewable energy, so the newly-stipulated increase would nearly double its renewable energy capacity by the end of the three-year IRP.

John Amis / AP

Georgia Power has asked for permission to go up on its prices.

The Savannah Morning News reports the utility is seeking to increase customer rates by about 7% in 2020.

Grant Blankenship / GPB News

Georgia Power customers and taxpayers have been helping foot the bill for the expansion project at Plant Vogtle, which is billions of dollars over budget and years behind schedule.


Grant Blankenship / GPB News

After a number of meetings and several deadline delays, the construction of the controversial Plant Vogtle will continue.  Oglethorpe Power voted yes on Wednesday to keep building the nuclear plant. A 90 percent agreement between the project's co-owners was needed to continue construction of the plant. The vote was triggered after projected costs to complete Vogtle skyrocketed by $2.3 billion.

Grant Blankenship / GPB News

Two key players in the construction of Plant Vogtle have decided to continue on with the project. 

Georgia Power and the Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia have each agreed to move forward in  building the nuclear power facility, but Oglethorpe Power, which has a 30 percent stake in the project, only offered a conditional yes.

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh meets Sen. David Perdue on Capitol Hill in Washington.
Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, evangelical leaders and GOP politicians are continuing to voice their support for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh even as the controversy over allegations of sexual assault continue to cloud his confirmation.


Grant Blankenship / GPB News

A vote that could determine the fate of Plant Vogtle must come by Monday.


Georgia Power

Georgia Power customers will receive another $25 credit on their July power bill, the utility said in a news release.

This is the second of three credits planned under the Vogtle nuclear plant construction.

The Georgia Public Service Commission approved a total of $188 million in credits as part of its order to continue construction of Vogtle 3 and 4 at the Augusta plant. Units 1 and 2 have been in operation since 1987 and 1989.

Sean Powers/GPB

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(AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgians will continue to pay for an expansion of the Plant Vogtle nuclear power facility, thanks to a ruling by the Public Service Commission. Our panel will weigh in on how much we’ll pay and look at why the decision has sparked controversy. Plus, state legislators are considering a new tax on phones, television subscriptions and streaming services like Netflix. We’ll discuss the reasons. And, the U.S. Ambassador to the U.N.

Wikimedia Commons

Georgia consumers will have to pay more for power, starting in 2021, now that state regulators have voted to let construction continue on two nuclear reactors at Plant Vogtle near Augusta.

At a hearing Thursday, the Georgia Public Service Commission voted unanimously in favor of continuing construction at Plant Vogtle.

This is despite the project being billions of dollars over budget and years behind schedule.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

Georgia Power’s expansion of nuclear power at Plant Vogtle is still alive following a unanimous vote by the state’s Public Service Commission.

(AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

On this edition of "Political Rewind," the Public Service Commission is about to make a momentous decision that will hit Georgia Power customers in the pocketbook and influence the future of nuclear power across the country. Will the PSC uphold Georgia Power’s plan to continue construction of the troubled Plant Vogtle? Will the commission approve a power company proposal to increase the surcharge customers are already paying for building the nuclear plant? Plus, we’ll look at the fallout from the blackout at Hartsfield-Jackson Airport.

GPB

Operations are getting back to normal at the world's busiest airport after a massive power outage Sunday completely shut down Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta.

Georgia Power officials say a fire in a substation below the airport knocked out both the main power and the backup power for several hours on Sunday.

Cleaning Up Georgia's Coal Ash Ponds

Nov 13, 2017
Flickr

Coal ash is a toxic substance. For years it was haphazardly dumped into rivers and ponds. Within the last 10 years or so, there has been a push to clean up the way coal ash is disposed. Georgia Power has vowed to close all its dump ponds. We talk with Chris Bowers, a senior attorney for the Southern Environmental Law Center. We also hear from Jen Hilburn of Altamaha Riverkeeper.

AP Photo / John Bazemore

Thursday will be a big day for Georgia Power, millions of its customers all over the state, and the entire U.S. nuclear industry.

 

That’s when the utility will say whether it wants to continue building two new nuclear reactors at Plant Vogtle. It’s the majority owner of the facility, which already has two operating nuclear reactors built back in the 1980s.  

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Just up the road from Plant Vogtle, about 30 miles south of Augusta, sits Hawkins Rentals.

Rows of RV campers hunch on sandy lots beneath longleaf pines. About a mile away, large cooling towers from the nuclear power facility belch clouds of steam into the air.

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