georgia legislature

GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, Gov. Kemp orders state agency heads to ignore requests by legislative leaders to attend fall budget hearings and send his mandated 4% cuts directly to him. Why is Kemp cutting legislators out of the process and what does it say about support under the “Gold Dome” for his dramatic cuts across the board? We’ll ask our panel for answers.

 


Chickens at a chicken house in Cumming, Ga., April 24, 2006.
(AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Today on Political Rewind, Georgia’s poultry producers may soon receive millions of dollars of government relief to compensate for their losses as a result of President Donald Trump’s trade war with China. As that war continues, how is it affecting the president’s standing among Georgia farmers? Our panel weighs in.

 


In the era of “fake news” and “alternative facts,” the focus on language in politics is high. What a bill is or campaign is called can be just as important as the actual contents. With the recent string of “heartbeat” and related bills in several states, we took a look at the role language plays into how we debate issues in public. 

Dr Fern Johnson, professor emerita in English at Clark University, joined us to talk about the power of connotation and the tools legislators use. Her research centers on the discourse surrounding ethnicity, race and gender.

Bob Andres / The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

The state of Georgia — and the country — is divided over so-called "heartbeat" bills and other new state laws restricting abortion. Many are confused about who could be prosecuted and what, exactly, constitutes a violation of the law.

On Second Thought leaves the flashpoints of politics behind and attempts to get some clarity on the legal questions raised by HB 481.


On today's show, we looked ahead to Super Bowl LIII this weekend, explored the legacy of Atlanta DJ Alley Cat and heard updates from the GPB newsroom about the Georgia legislature.

GPB reporter Stephen Fowler joined "On Second Thought" to discuss the Gov. Brian Kemp's state budget proposal and a bipartisan group of lawmakers' renewed efforts to pass the Equal Rights Amendment.


Andre M / Wikimedia Commons

Georgia has been a major player in the music industry. Atlanta especially is a mecca for rap, hip-hop and R&B. Notable artists come here to record, and Georgia has been home to a number of famous names, including Ray Charles, Arrested Development, T.I., Ludacris and heavy metal band Mastodon.

 

Now, state legislators are working to make Georgia an even bigger hub for music and entertainment. Recently, Georgia Rep. Erica Thomas announced plans to co-chair a newly created Georgia Entertainment Caucus. She joined "On Second Thought," along with Grammy Award-winning music producer and engineer Matt Still, to discuss the caucus' potential impact.

 

Grant Blankenship / GPB News

Gov. Nathan Deal signed a trio of bills on Saturday that provide some financial relief to Georgians affected by Hurricane Michael and ratified an executive order suspending sales tax on jet fuel June 30.

Georgia Department of Agriculture

Georgia's House of Representatives passed a bill Thursday that provides about $270 million to hurricane-stricken parts of the state.

The house voted 162-1 on the measure, which will help pay for debris removal and building repair, plus assist farmers whose crops were devestated by Hurricane Michael in October.


The Georgia General Assembly session begins on January 14, 2019.
Ken Lund / Creative Commons

Georgia lawmakers have kicked off a special session of the state legislature to tackle two major bills before the next session begins in January. 

The main focus would amend the state's budget to add nearly $270 million to help farmers and others in Southwest Georgia recover from Hurricane Michael. 


Voter casts ballot in Sandy Springs, Ga.
John Bazemore / AP Photo

Seven ballot measures are currently up for vote during Georgia's midterm elections. They cover everything from victims' rights to environmental conservation, but why are they so hard to understand?

We spoke with GPB's Stephen Fowler and Zac Peskowitz, assistant professor of political science at Emory University, to learn the history behind these measures and highlight a few on the ballot in Georgia.


Today on the show, we discussed the upcoming Georgia special session on hurricane relief and heard from actors telling immigrant stories through "Accents."

We heard GPB's Leah Flemming interview Joshua Johnson about "1A" ahead of his visit to the studios on Thursday.

Gov. Nathan Deal called a special session of the Georgia legislature for Nov. 13 to address the devastation caused by Hurricane Michael. We spoke with "Political Rewind" host Bill Nigut about political responses to Hurricane Michael as well as the gubernatorial debates between Stacey Abrams, Brian Kemp and Ted Metz.

New Georgia Laws In Effect Now

Jul 2, 2018
Wikimedia Commons

July 1 marked the first day many new Georgia laws went into effect.

While the hands-free driving law might be the most well known addition, keep in mind that it's not the only one to be aware of.

Kemp For Governor/YouTube

On this edition of Political Rewind, Governor Deal has only a week left to take action on bills passed during the 2018 legislative session.  Our panel will look at how he may respond to some of the most contentious measures on his desk and at bills that, once signed, will have an impact on Georgians.  Then, GOP gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp is facing harsh criticism for an allegedly humorous ad in which he points a gun at a teenage boy looking to date on of his daughters.  Kemp’s response to the attacks: just spell my name right!  Plus, a new Pew research study shows that Americans hav

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, we take the show on the road to Macon and the campus of Mercer University to hear from voters and local political experts about the issues that matter to middle Georgians.  Do residents there feel their voices are heard up I-75 at the State Capitol and how will those feelings resonate come election day?  Also, Macon and Bibb County have a joint government that was intended to save money, but has it worked?  We discuss.

Panelists:

AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway

On this edition of Political Rewind, the 2018 session of the Georgia General Assembly was gaveled to a close late last night.  What did lawmakers do about measures to crack down on distracted driving, to expand transit across metro Atlanta, or to boost the chances for economic growth in rural Georgia?  We’ll look at these and other accomplishments under the “Gold Dome” this year.  Then, with the session now finished, the sprint to the May primary elections is now under way.  We’ll look at where the top races stand right now.  Plus, the City of Atlanta has been paralyzed by one of the bigges

AP Images

On Thursday, 'Sine Die' marked the last day of the Georgia General Assembly's 2018 legislative session. As always, lawmakers scrambled to vote on as many bills as possible before the midnight deadline.

We talked with Lisa Rayam, Capitol correspondent for Georgia Public Broadcasting, about what bills are on Governor Nathan Deal’s desk, and which of them are likely to become law.

On this edition of Political Rewind, legislators have just one day left in the 2018 session and a number of key bills remain unresolved.  We’ll look at where the measures that have attracted public interest stand and at some of the sleepers that could have an impact on our lives.  Then, for the first time since he became governor, Nathan Deal says the state coffers have enough cash to fully fund schools across the state and his budget includes the money to do it.

Andre M / Wikimedia Commons

Georgia's 40-day legislative session wraps up at midnight on Thursday, and that means lawmakers have just over 48 hours to pass new laws.

GPB’s Bill Nigut, host of Political Rewind,  joined me in the studio to talk about what is happening in the final sprint.

RICKEY BEVINGTON: So let's start with three bills that have already been secured. Governor Nathan Deal has signed the adoption bill, the mid-year budget, and tax cuts. What is in those?

Olivia Reingold

On this edition of Political Rewind, we look at the impact of a big weekend of news.  Hundreds of thousands of students across the country march, including in Atlanta, in support of gun safety measures.  Plus, there are only two days left in the 2018 legislative session.  We’ll look at the key measures that remain undecided.  Then, porn star Stormy Daniels speaks out about her relationship with Donald Trump and about the effort to keep it out of public view.  Will her story have an impact on the Trump Presidency? 

Panelists:

(AP Photo/Joe Marquette)

On this edition of Political Rewind, we look back on the life on one of Georgia’s most famous political figures, Zell Miller, who passed away Friday.  Also, as the legislative clock winds down to Sine Die, powerful interests are working to block a bill its sponsor says will broaden legal remedies for victims of childhood sexual abuse.  Plus, how are Georgia’s cities faring in this year’s session?

Panelists:

AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway

Former Zell Miller Chief of Staff Keith Mason

On this edition of Political Rewind, we are live from the Georgia State Capitol for Crossover Day.  Which crucial bills will die and which will live to see another day?  Among the measures hanging in the balance: a bill to keep guns out of the hands of Georgians with mental illness and a tax break for Delta Airlines that’s now caught up in the highly charged gun control debate. 

Panelists:

AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway

AJC Political Reporter Greg Bluestein

Columbus Mayor Teresa Tomlinson

Republican Insider Jackie Cushman

On this edition of Political Rewind, to bring high speed internet to rural Georgia, legislators are looking at a broad range of taxes on services every Georgian uses, from streaming services to media downloads, even to satellite TV services.  Will the proposal fly in an election year?  Also, legislators look to impose a stiffer tax on used car purchases while also looking to bring back a tax break for electric vehicles.  As the legislative session unfolds, two GOP candidates for governor are dueling over a proposal to eliminate the state income tax. 

Panelists:

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Georgia Senate entertains a bill that would crack down on protestors who disrupt controversial speakers on university campuses.  Does it protect or intrude upon free speech?  Also, a traditionally conservative Georgia newspaper takes aim at one of the state senate’s most conservative members on the issue of adoption.  Plus, legislation sponsored by Georgia Senator David Perdue is in the sights of a bi-partisan group of legislators on Capitol Hill.  They fear Purdue’s efforts to reduce legal immigration could threaten a compromise that would prevent a

  

The Georgia legislative session has begun. Among many bills in play: a sweeping plan to revitalize rural Georgia. This might mean paying people who move to the country, subsidizing internet connections, and making it easier for small hospitals to stay open and in the black. But how all this attention under the Gold Dome translates to real improvements for people outside Atlanta remains to be seen.  We talk with Sharon Wright Austin, a political scientist at the University of Florida. And Mark Niesse, a reporter for the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

(AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, President Trump visits Atlanta for the college football national championship game.  What plans do protestors have to make their voices heard?  Also, the Georgia Legislature is back in session.  Will lawmakers steer clear of hot button issues as they prepare to face elections later this year?  And, there are new plans to rebrand the state’s most prominent tribute to the Confederacy.

Panelists:

AJC Political Reporter Jim Galloway

Democratic Consultant Tharon Johnson

AP Photo/Tannen Maury

On this edition of Political Rewind, we’re discussing a bill set to be debated in the state legislature that would establish a hate crimes law in Georgia.  We’re one of just a handful of states without one.  Then, Attorney General Jeff Sessions opens the door for a federal crackdown on legal marijuana.  What impact could it have on our medical pot statute?  The White House is now in full battle mode against a sensational new book that alleges Trump’s closest allies think he’s not fit to be president.

Panelists:

On this edition of Political Rewind, we ring in the new year with a look at the major events we’ll be following through 2018.  Georgians will elect a new governor while Republicans are banking on the fact that the state remains deeply red and will continue GOP dominance under the “Gold Dome”.  Democrats say they’ll put that presumption to a serious test. Oh, and President Trump starts the new year with yet another tweet storm.

Panelists:

GaPundit.com Owner and Editor Todd Rehm

Former Pollster Beth Shapiro

Wikimedia Commons / Ken Lund.

Georgia lawmakers convene the second week of January. The Center for Public Integrity and The Associated Press recently analyzed financial disclosure reports from state legislators nationwide. They found many examples of legislators using their power to benefit personal interests.  We talk with Liz Whyte, reporter with the Center for Public Integrity. And James Salzer, who covers state politics for the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

Governor Signs Medical Marijuana Expansion On Final Day

May 10, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo

Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal approved an expansion of the state's medical marijuana program on Tuesday, allowing people being treated for six additional medical conditions to possess cannabis oil.

The new qualifying conditions include autism, AIDS, Tourette's syndrome, and Alzheimer's disease. Patients must register with the state to be eligible and have a doctor's permission.

WALLY GOBETZ / Flickr/CC

Governor Nathan Deal has vetoed a bill that would have made changes to the state’s adoption laws.

It’s one of the nine bills he blocked Tuesday, the deadline for the governor to take action on legislation passed by the General Assembly this year.

Pages