Georgia Historical Society

L-R: Patricia Meagher, Georgia Historical Society; Rev. Dr. Charles Goodman, Senior Pastor of Tabernacle Baptist Church; Christine Miller-Betts, Executive Director of Lucy Laney Museum; Augusta Mayor Hardie Davis
Don Small / Don Small Photography

In the 134 years since its founding by the Rev. C.T. Walker, who was just 27 years old at the time, Tabernacle Baptist Church in Augusta has been much more than just a house of worship. The Georgia Historical Society recognized the church's contribution to the Civil Rights Movement by dedicating a "Civil Rights Trail Historical Marker" last week. 

(AP Photo/Library of Congress)

Casimir Pulaski was born in Poland in 1745. After proving his military mastery in independence struggles across Europe, Pulaski moved to Boston in 1777. He formed the colonists' first legion on horseback, became Brigadier General and saved George Washington's retreating troops at Brandywine. Pulaski was later mortally wounded, and died, amid the 1779 Siege of Savannah. But for centuries, his final resting place remained a mystery.

Earlier this month, the Smithsonian Channel revealed not only that the "father of the American cavalry" was indeed buried in Savannah – but also that Pulaski may biologically have been intersex. Both breakthroughs came after decades of research by a team based in Georgia with help from colleagues across the United States, Poland and Canada.


Over two rainy days in Savannah, 436 people were listed for sale to pay off the debts of the man who owned them. The 1859 event, now known as the “Weeping Time,” was the largest sale of enslaved people in American history.

This weekend, the Georgia Historical Society remembers with events in coastal Georgia.

I spoke with Weeping Time historian Dr. Kwesi DeGraft-Hanson to learn more.


Georgia Historical Society

The first colonial settlers landed with James Oglethorpe in February 1733 in what is now Savannah. 

The Georgia Historical Society celebrates the founding of the state annually with the Georgia History Festival, beginning this year on Friday with Georgia Day.

GPB’s Cindy Hill spoke with Georgia Historical Society senior historian Stan Deaton and Pattye Meahger to learn more.

Ross Terrell / GPB News

The Georgia Historical Society named the Georgia Dome an iconic site. The designation comes about 10 months after 5,000 pounds of explosives reduced the stadium to rubble.

Now, a historical marker sits where the Dome sat for 25 years.