Georgia

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  • Police To Re-Test Evidence In Atlanta Child Murders Case
  • Lawmakers Celebrate Expansion Of Ocmulgee National Historic Park
  • Sec. of State Opens Investigation Into Allegations Of Lost Absentee Ballots


Ross Terrell / Georgia Public Broadcasting

Police will re-examine evidence from the Atlanta child murder cases of the 1970s and '80s.  

From 1979 to 1981, nearly 30 African-American kids, teens and adults were killed in Atlanta. The majority of them were male.


MaxPixel

  • Isakson Pushes For Disaster Relief Funding
  • Medicaid Waiver Bill Approved By House Panel
  • GSU Men, Mercer Women Begin NCAA Tourney Play Friday

Alliance Theatre

Atlanta-based playwright and author Pearl Cleage invites people to examine the messy, frequently irrational parts of being human. In several best-selling novels and plays, she explores issues of race, gender and identity. Her newest play, "Angry, Raucous and Shamelessly Gorgeous," premieres at Alliance Theatre in March.

Cleage joined "On Second Thought" to discuss her start as a writer, her piece, "Mad at Miles," in the era of the #MeToo movement, and how her newest play tackles aging in the public eye.

GPB/ Jade Abdul-Malik

Museums that hold the history of our collective past are having a renewed moment right now.  

 

As the country and the world grapples with a rise in white supremacy, xenophobia, racist rhetoric, and mass killing, people are flocking to museums for guidance and reassurance.

 

The National Center for Civil and Human Rights in Atlanta is one such place.

 

 


Courtesy of Cherry Blossom Festival, Macon

"On Second Thought" kicked off the first day of spring with a preview of events happening around Georgia.

Theater critic and Arts ATL contributor Kelundra Smith shared her picks for seasonal shows, festivals and events. 


  • Isakson Responds To Trump, Calling Behavior 'Deplorable'
  • Supreme Court Rejects Case Of Georgia Man On Death Row
  • Korean Company To Open First U.S. Manufacturing Plant In Georgia


GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, an exclusive interview with Georgia's Senior U.S. Senator Johnny Isakson. Isakson responds to President Trump's attacks on John McCain in recent days that came in a flurry of Twitter posts over the weekend and in comments to reporters at the White House.

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport
Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport

As Atlanta city officials wait to see if control of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport is given to the state, the senator who introduced the legislation defended doing so.

Republican Sen. Burt Jones is the sponsor of Senate Bill 131. It would create the Georgia Major Airport Authority. That group, would take over control of any airport that “conducts more than 400,000 takeoffs and landing in any calendar year.”

State officials say more than 100,000 service members from Georgia were deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan between 2001 and 2012. Nationally, about 20 percent of veterans coming back from those conflicts have been diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and traumatic brain injuries. Alchemy Sky Foundation is an Atlanta organization that helps people heal through music. It recently worked with a group of metro Atlanta veterans to create a song called "Adjust Fire." 


Sen. Johnny Isakson responded during an appearance on GPB’s Political Rewind to President Donald Trump's recent attack of the late Sen. John McCain.

Isakson called the president’s remarks “deplorable.”


MaxPixel

  • Isakson Slams Trump For McCain Attacks
  • McBath Talks Infrastructure With City And State Officials
  • HHS Secretary Azar Detail HIV Eradication Plan At CDC

Courtesy of Alchemy Sky Foundation

State officials say more than 100,000 service members from Georgia were deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan between 2001 and 2012. Nationally, about 20 percent of veterans coming back from those conflicts have been diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and traumatic brain injuries.

Alchemy Sky Foundation is an Atlanta organization that helps people heal through music. It recently worked with a group of metro Atlanta veterans to create a song called "Adjust Fire." 


Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar during an interview at the 2019 National HIV Prevention Conference in Atlanta.
Robert Jimison / GPB

Just over a month after President Donald Trump shared his goal to eliminate HIV in the next decade, his health secretary is out touting details of how the administration hopes to end transmission and prevent new diagnoses by 2030. 


Stephen Fowler | GPB News

By the end of the week, the Georgia Senate could join the ranks of other state legislatures when they vote on a so-called “heartbeat bill” that would effectively ban abortions about six weeks into pregnancy.

While the proposed restrictions grab headlines, abortion rights opponents say the aim of this type of bill isn’t only to limit access to the procedure, but also to trigger a Supreme Court challenge to federal protections for abortion.

Both abortion rights advocates and opponents say language in Georgia’s bill could make the case.

 


Gwinnett County citizens voted against joining Metro Atlanta’s Transit Authority Tuesday night.

Nearly 92,000 voters turned up at the polls for the special election and 54 percent of them voted no on the referendum.

It would’ve allowed the county to create a 1 percent sales tax for the next 30 years to fund public transit expansion and join into the MARTA system. County officials said that could've created $5.4 billion in funding. 

Tyler Kaufman / AP

March Madness is upon us!  The NCAA holds its men’s and women’s college basketball tournaments this month.  It’s a time of brackets and betting – and to have our in-house sport experts on “On Second Thought.”

GPB reporter Ross Terrell and Morning Edition producer Taylor Gantt stopped by the show.


  • Rep. McBath Weighs In On Potential MARTA Expansion In Gwinnett Co.
  • Self-Driving Vehicles Could Come To DeKalb Co.
  • HHS Sec. Azar Addresses HIV Epidemic During Visit To Georgia


Stephen Fowler / GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, the legislature continues to hurtle toward Sine Die with some of the most controversial measures seen in decades still unresolved. A bill to protect Confederate monuments is still in play. And the fetal heartbeat bill will soon be scheduled for debate in the full Senate.


Courtesy of AP Images

It takes about a decade to grow a productive pecan tree and a matter of minutes to take one down. A University of Georgia specialist estimates Hurricane Michael's 100 mph winds left 75 percent of pecan crops unharvestable in several south Georgia counties. UGA also estimates a total of $2 billion in losses to the state's agriculture industry.

Five months after the storm, many farmers are still picking up the pieces. "On Second Thought" has been following up with growers ever since the storm. Randy Hudson's family has run Hudson Pecan Company in Irwin County for more than 150 years. Rob Cohen owns Pecan Ridge Plantation in Decatur County. He's been in the family business for several decades. Cohen and Hudson gave updates on their crops as a new season begins.


MaxPixel

  • Gwinnett County Votes On Transit Today
  • State Ethics Commission Choses New Director
  • Needle Exchange Bill Passes Out Of Senate Committee

It takes about a decade to grow a productive pecan tree, but only a matter of minutes to take one down. Five months after the storm, a University of Georgia specialist estimates that Hurricane Michael left 75 percent of pecan crops unviable in several south Georgia counties. Combined losses in the state's agricultural sector run around $2.5 billion. 


Scott Ehardt / Wikimedia Commons

Voters in Gwinnett will head to the polls Tuesday to vote on whether they want to join MARTA. The vote is required after Gov. Nathan Deal signed House Bill 930 into law last year, allowing the 13 metro-Atlanta counties to decide on buying into the system.

Dyana Bagby / Charis Books

E.R. Anderson is the executive director of Charis Circle, the nonprofit programming arm of feminist bookstore Charis Books and More in Atlanta. Anderson stopped by "On Second Thought" to share more choices for our "Southern Reading List" series in which authors and readers share books that define and reflect the South.

Anderson highlighted Kiese Laymon's "Heavy: An American Memoir," which describes Laymon's relationships with trauma, toxic masculinity and his own family.


Donna Lowry / GPB

The Georgia House has a new representative who will only be on the job for the last nine days of the 2019 session.

James Burchett (R-Waycross) was sworn into House seat 176 Monday morning before work in the chamber got underway.

Burchett won a runoff election last week to fill the seat vacated by Jason Shaw.  Governor Nathan Deal appointed Shaw to the Public Service Commission.

It's hard enough to eat well and stay in shape, but, in several parts of Georgia, residents don't even have access to nutritious foods.  The Georgia Farmers Market Association is trying to bring awareness to the issue and help overcome barriers to access. Its initiatives connect small growers with communities that don't have good options to buy fresh, high-quality meat and produce. 


  • Abortion Bill Passes Senate Committee Along Party, Gender Lines
  • Nine Candidates Running For Atlanta City Council Seat In Special Election
  • Cox Enterprises Looking To Sell Dozens Of Radio Stations Including WSB


Ross Terrell / Georgia Public Broadcasting

Some Democrats in Georgia’s House spoke out Monday against a bill that gives added protection to memorials and monuments, including those built to honor the Confederacy.


GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, as the week begins, a bill that all but bans abortion in Georgia tops news out of the legislature once again. We’ll look at today’s early morning Senate committee meeting that was called with little advance notice to determine the fate of the measure.


MARTA

It's hard enough to eat well and stay in shape, but, in several parts of Georgia, residents don't even have access to nutritious foods. 

The Georgia Farmers Market Association is trying to bring awareness to the issue and help overcome barriers to access. Its initiatives connect small growers with communities that don't have good options to buy fresh, high-quality meat and produce. 


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