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Jeff Amy / AP

Thursday on Political Rewind, the Georgia House voted yesterday on a midyear budget differing significantly from the proposal submitted by Gov. Brian Kemp.

The altered budget, passed by a 126-to-46 vote, maintains funding for services that state representatives deemed too important to cut, including funds for food inspectors in the Department of Agriculture, accountability courts and mental health services.

What do we see happening next in this budget battle?


Leaders in Houston County have formed a complete count committee to encourage participation in the 2020 census.
Robert Jimison / GPB

With just under 100 days until Census Day, communities across Georgia are working to get the word out about the population count that happens every 10 years.

Billboards and digital advertisements hoping to encourage people to respond to the questionnaire will begin appearing throughout the state. A coalition of local government leaders in Middle Georgia are working together in hopes of increasing participation.

Government and community leaders are working to avoid an undercount of rural and minority communities in the 2020 census.
Robert Jimison / GPB

Of the more than 10 million people who live in Georgia, about 1.6 million residents live in areas of the state that do not have broadband internet. This creates a problem for these communities as the U.S. Census Bureau prepares for the 2020 census that will primarily be conducted online.


Georgia House Speaker David Ralston, R-Blue Ridge, speaking with the press ahead of the 2020 Georgia General Assembly.
Donna Lowry / GPB

The top Republican in Georgia’s House of Representatives is anticipating a lengthy 2020 legislative session as state lawmakers grapple with tax and budgeting rules.

During his annual pre-session press conference House Speaker David Ralston, R-Blue Ridge, laid out his expectations and offered a preview of the upcoming General Assembly.

Jacquelyn Martin / AP

Republican finance executive Kelly Loeffler took the oath of office and was sworn in Monday as the newest member of the United States Senate representing Georgia. Her appointment to the upper chamber of Congress follows the early retirement of three-term Sen. Johnny Isakson. 


On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, a conversation with Pulitzer Prize winning author Rick Atkinson.  His new book, The British Are Coming, tells the story of the early years of the Revolutionary War, a war that took the lives of one in ten Americans.  It’s a stark portrait of the courage and the carnage of battle.

 

 Guest:

Rick Atkinson, Author, The British Are Coming

On Thursday, Gov. Brian Kemp announced "Every. One. Counts." The state's official campaign to encourage participation in the 2020 U.S. Census.
Office of Georgia Governor Brian P. Kemp

Gov. Brian Kemp announced the state's official 2020 census campaign on Thursday. The aim of "Every. One. Counts" is to encourage all Georgia residents to respond to the questionnaire.

The campaign is lead by the state's complete count committee, a group of politicians, civic leaders and nonprofit partners from across the state. The committee is working with the U.S. Census Bureau and local partners in Georgia to get the word out and secure strong participation in the 2020 census. 

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, it’s a look at the biggest political stories of 2019.  A new governor put his unique stamp on Georgia, an unexpected resignation put the state front and center in the race for Senate, and two Georgia members of Congress announced their departures. 

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, we dive deep into the increasingly political act of redistricting. We look at how past elections have influenced voting districts in Georgia today and how districts have kept incumbents in power in the state. 


Bill Nigut with Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-Georgia)
GPB News

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, we honor retiring U.S. Senator Johnny Isakson, from his days as one of the lonely Republicans in the state legislature, to his bruising battle for governor against Zell Miller, to his efforts to maintain a bi-partisan approach to governing in the U.S. Senate. 

Rep. Barry Loudermilk, R-Ga., speaks as the House of Representatives debates the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019.
House Television via AP

In Washington, members of Congress are stating their cases for and against two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. The debate process is expected to last six hours and will prominently feature a number of representatives from Georgia.

Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee listen as the panel considers the investigative findings in the impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Dec. 9, 2019.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

In a vote along party lines, the House Judiciary Committee voted to advance two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump to the full House on Friday. Following two days of debate and lengthy televised hearings, the committee process has ended and the House is expected to take up the two articles for a vote next week.

Three representatives from Georgia sit on the influential committee: Rep. Doug Collins, R-Gainesville, Rep. Hank Johnson, D-Lithonia, and Rep. Lucy McBath, D-Marietta.


House Judiciary Committee ranking member Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., gives his opening statement during a House Judiciary Committee markup of the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump, Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington
Jacquelyn Martin / AP

Georgia members serving on the House Judiciary Committee aligned with their respective party when approaching how to make a case for or against the impeachment of President Donald Trump. 

On Wednesday, committee members began the two-day process to consider the articles of impeachment against the president.

Sam Bermas-Dawes / GPB News

Today on Political Rewind, we are live from the studios of WUGA in Athens. We will discuss the impending announcement from Gov. Brian Kemp about his decision regarding Sen. Johnny Isakson’s seat. At the moment, Atlanta business executive Kelly Loeffler seems likely to be the pick, despite pressure from President Donald Trump to tap a fierce ally from Georgia, Rep. Doug Collins.

How will Georgia conservatives react to this perceived rebuke of the president? Will Collins, if he is not tapped for the seat, plan on contesting it in 2020?

We also hear Sen. Isakson's farewell address from the U.S. Senate floor.


On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, a conversation with Pulitzer Prize winning author Rick Atkinson.  His new book, The British Are Coming, tells the story of the early years of the Revolutionary War, a war that took the lives of one in ten Americans.  It’s a stark portrait of the courage and the carnage of battle.

 

 Guest:

Rick Atkinson, Author, The British Are Coming

Rep. Doug Collins R-Ga., speaks on a news conference during the House Republican members conference in Baltimore, Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019.
AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana

Today on Political Rewind, As we await word on Gov. Brian Kemp’s appointment to fill Johnny Isakson’s seat in the U.S. Senate, President Trump advocates for Rep. Doug Collins. Will Kemp agree or will he go with his own choice?


Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Today on Political Rewind, President Donald Trump jumps the gun and declares his choice for Sen. Johnny Isakson’s seat, even before Gov. Brian Kemp announces his own preference. Will Kemp bend to the president’s will or make an independent decision? Our panel weighs in on the possible fallout from the president’s impulsive decision to back Congressman Doug Collins for the job. 

"I think the governor needs to consider that the president is looking for partisan loyalty," Spelman College's Marilyn Davis said.


Sam Bermas-Dawes / GPB News

On this two-hour Special Edition of Political Rewind, we were live from Tyler Perry Studios on the day of the Democratic Presidential Debate with an all-star panel of guests discussing what to expect from the candidates in tonight's debate. 

David Goldman / AP Photo

Today on Political Rewind, it is debate week in Georgia. Democratic candidates for president and other party leaders are already arriving in Atlanta to promote their key issues and energize voters for the 2020 election cycle. We will look at how the days leading up to the debate are unfolding.

Russ Bynum / AP

The impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump moved into a new phase last week as the House Intelligence Committee held its first open hearings.

As the witnesses were sworn-in that morning, the president’s supporters in Georgia’s Congressional delegation had already begun to voice their opposition to the inquiry.

Alex Brandon / AP Photo

Today on Political Rewind, Gov. Brian Kemp sets Monday as the deadline to apply for Sen. Johnny Isakson’s seat. More than 500 people have offered themselves for the job, including some prominent GOP leaders and well-known Georgians. We ask our panel if they expect more big names to come forward in the final days of the process.


A new poll of registered voters in Georgia suggests President Donald Trump has challenges ahead as he works to win the state in 2020. The results give us a snapshot of which Democratic candidates might be most successful in beating the president in Georgia. Our panel looks at the data.


In this Monday, April 17, 2017 photo, various cannabis oil products are displayed in the office of Georgia State Rep. Allen Peake in Macon, Ga.
David Goldman / AP

Georgia officials have made appointments to the state medical marijuana commission, a key step toward implementing a law designed to increase patient access.

Republican Gov. Brian Kemp, Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan and House Speaker David Ralston announced seven appointments Tuesday. They include several doctors, a professor, a police chief and a small business owner.

Atlanta Falcons quarterback Matt Ryan (2) drops back to pass in the first half of an NFL football game against the New Orleans Saints in New Orleans, Sunday, Nov. 10, 2019.
Gerald Herbert / AP

On this edition of Political Rewind, if you are wagering that sports betting may soon be legal in Georgia, your odds of being correct have just gotten better.

The Atlanta Hawks, the Braves, Atlanta United and the Falcons have joined forces to push the legislature to make it legal. Our panel weighs in on how the battle is likely to unfold in the upcoming session.

 


J. David Ake / AP Photo

As the country honors its military veterans today, we’ll look at the problems that continue to plague the veterans’ hospital here in Atlanta and at the efforts of Sen. Johnny Isakson to turn around a dysfunctional health care delivery system for veterans across the country.


Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Today on Political Rewind, Democratic Party of Georgia Chair, state Sen. Nikema Williams, joins our panel to discuss how Democrats plan to use Atlanta’s presidential debate in their efforts to turn the Peach State purple.


John Bazemore / AP

Today on Political Rewind, we sit down for an exclusive interview with Georgia’s Speaker of the House David Ralston. Our conversation’s timing could not be better.

 

Stephen Fowler / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgians will get a chance to weigh in on Gov. Brian Kemp’s health care waivers. Kemp’s proposals would give more authority to the state for health insurance powers that are now held by the federal government. Where do Georgians stand on the state government’s role in health care coverage?

 


Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

Today on Political Rewind, the deep partisan divide among Georgia congressmen is apparent as the U.S. House votes to launch a formal impeachment investigation into President Donald Trump. How will the weeks ahead play into 2020 elections here and across the nation?


Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Today on Political Rewind, the secretary of state has announced plans to strike more than 300,000 Georgians from the voter rolls. Similar to the 2018 election, voting rights groups are calling the move an attempt to surpress votes, while the secretary of state’s office says it is an effort to ensure honest elections. Our panel looks at the arguments on both sides.


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