Gaming industry

Martin Meissner / AP

In the aftermath of mass shootings, debate over why these massacres keep happening — and how to fix them — bubbles up again. And, after the shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, President Donald Trump again pointed to mental illness and violent video games.

Politicians singling out video games for inspiring violence isn't new. (Nor is the research debunking this connection.) In the past, however, moral outrage and blame came from both sides of the political aisle. Now, a recent article in The Atlantic argues that the topic has become an increasingly partisan issue.


Poker and chess are both considered professional sports. Competitive gaming is now on that list. Esports is, in fact, booming. Market watchers predict revenues to hit $1.5 billion by 2020. The gaming industry is so big that Georgia high schools got the green light to form student esports teams in 2018. 

As the definition of athletes expands, so do demands to treat gaming-related injuries. Dr. Vonda Wright is an Atlanta-based orthopedic surgeon. She's currently partnering with game developers Skillshot Media to research and treat professional gamers. Wright spoke with On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott about her efforts.