food insecurity

Across Georgia, Farmers Markets For Those With Little Cash

Jul 9, 2019
Marianna Bacallao / GPB

While most farmers’ markets are a way of supporting local farmers, a series of markets popping up around the state are also a way of supporting low-income households.  

The Georgia Department of Public Health is holding markets to get fresh produce in the hands of families enrolled in the federal Women, Infant, and Children (WIC) nutrition program. 


Summer Meals Are Heating Up For Hungry Kids In Macon

Jun 18, 2019
Marianna Bacallao / GPB

Most kids who rely on free or reduced-price lunch during the school year lose that steady source of food when the summer begins.

To help compensate for lost meals, counties across the state participate in the United States Department of Agriculture’s Summer Food Service Program. Schools, parks and other USDA-designated meal sites provide free breakfast and lunch to students in need.


Ross Terrell/Georgia Public Broadcasting

This month, GPB launched its "Full Plates" series, looking at hunger in Georgia. One in six Georgians is food insecure, meaning they don't always know where their next meal will come from. Food insecurity is often linked to access — in rural communities, as well as neighborhoods in and around metro Atlanta.

More than a third of metro Atlanta is considered a food desert. Ross Terrell met one Atlanta resident who's working to overcome a lack of reliable transportation, which is one barrier for some residents to access fresh, healthy food. Terrell visited On Second Thought to discuss the problems and solutions surrounding food deserts in Georgia's largest city.


www.foodfinder.us

According to the Georgia Food Bank Association, one in six Georgians is food insecure, meaning they don't know how or where they'll get their next meal. This week, as GPB reports on new approaches to food access, On Second Thought turns to a young Georgian who works on solutions to food insecurity on a national level.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

Food insecurity is a pressing issue nationwide — particularly in Georgia, where one out of every four children live in food insecure households. It's a dire picture for seniors, too, with the latest estimates putting Georgia in the top ten worst states for food insecurity among aging populations. 

Residents and officials across Georgia are working to address the problem. GPB's Full Plates series is taking listeners around the state to learn about creative local solutions to food access problems.


Stephen Fowler / GPB News

In Rome, a men’s homeless shelter has been cultivating a backyard farm with a variety of veggies to feed its residents.

The shelter has been so successful, they’re looking to share, bringing fresh food to the northwest Georgia community in a tricked-out school bus.


Ellen Eldridge / GPB News

Nearly half of college students on campus experience food insecurity, according to a recent study. It’s an issue University of Georgia students wanted to do something about.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

 Three to four days a week Ernestine Mims comes to the Senior Center in Twiggs County to eat lunch with her friends. On a recent afternoon, the women sat at a long table, covered in a yellow cloth.  Ernestine was clearly having fun.

“I laugh and talk, and I can go the day on, don’t think about nothing, no pains or nothing,” she said. “When I come up here I am able to forget about it. It’s just like a home away from home.” 

 


Pam Fessler / NPR

Three-quarters of a million people would likely lose their food stamps later this year under a new proposal by the Trump administration. The goal is to encourage able-bodied adults to go to work and get off government aid. But opponents predict people would go hungry instead, if the rule goes into effect.

A public comment period, which ends Tuesday, has so far drawn more than 28,000 comments overwhelmingly against the proposed rule.


MARTA

It's hard enough to eat well and stay in shape, but, in several parts of Georgia, residents don't even have access to nutritious foods. 

The Georgia Farmers Market Association is trying to bring awareness to the issue and help overcome barriers to access. Its initiatives connect small growers with communities that don't have good options to buy fresh, high-quality meat and produce. 


Emily Jones / GPB News

Thousands of Savannah residents don’t have easy access to fresh, nutritious foods. They live in food deserts, which are areas where people live more than a mile from a large grocery store. Savannah has several such areas, according to a recent Savannah Morning News investigation.

Reporter Brittini Ray spoke with GPB's Emily Jones.


sesame street big bird filming behind the scenes
Mark Lennihan / Associated Press

Since the 1960s, the crew at "Sesame Street" has helped generations of kids learn their numbers and ABC's. They also have explored tougher topics, introducing children to realities that may be hard to understand or discuss.

Writers and creators on "Sesame Street" have worked over the past few years to weave in stories of parental incarceration, autism and food insecurity. This year, the show debuted a story about homelessness through the character of Lily.

 


Bill Bolling / Atlanta Community Food Bank

Bill Bolling knew from his first experience at the community kitchen at St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Atlanta that he was destined for a life of service.

"I thought wow, this is it. After three college degrees and being a veteran — I even called my mother up and said, 'Mom! This is what God wants me to do,'" Bolling said. "Make soup!"

We spoke with Bill Bolling about founding the Atlanta Community Food Bank in 1979. The food bank has served over 750,000 people each year in Georgia. Bolling retired in 2015, but still actively works with food organizations like the Foodwell Alliance. He is also involved in collaborative efforts to combat poverty and housing inequality in the state.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

There’s something people think they know about the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as SNAP.

It’s the idea that people who use what we used to call food stamps spend their once monthly benefits on groceries almost immediately after they get them. When you look at averages, that’s true, and for some it can mean some lean and hungry days at the end of the month before the next round of SNAP benefits.