Food

Elizabeth Karmel/AP Images

While the particulars, origin stories and claims to be the barbecue capital of world may vary, Jim Auchmutey has found one thing we can agree on: Barbecue has a Southern accent. 

The veteran journalist and smoked meat sherpa recently wrote a new book — Smokelore: A Short History of Barbecue in America. Auchmutey stopped by On Second Thought to give a taste on what to expect from the history of barbecue.


Summer Meals Are Heating Up For Hungry Kids In Macon

Jun 18, 2019
Marianna Bacallao / GPB

Most kids who rely on free or reduced-price lunch during the school year lose that steady source of food when the summer begins.

To help compensate for lost meals, counties across the state participate in the United States Department of Agriculture’s Summer Food Service Program. Schools, parks and other USDA-designated meal sites provide free breakfast and lunch to students in need.


Ross Terrell/Georgia Public Broadcasting

This month, GPB launched its "Full Plates" series, looking at hunger in Georgia. One in six Georgians is food insecure, meaning they don't always know where their next meal will come from. Food insecurity is often linked to access — in rural communities, as well as neighborhoods in and around metro Atlanta.

More than a third of metro Atlanta is considered a food desert. Ross Terrell met one Atlanta resident who's working to overcome a lack of reliable transportation, which is one barrier for some residents to access fresh, healthy food. Terrell visited On Second Thought to discuss the problems and solutions surrounding food deserts in Georgia's largest city.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

Food insecurity is a pressing issue nationwide — particularly in Georgia, where one out of every four children live in food insecure households. It's a dire picture for seniors, too, with the latest estimates putting Georgia in the top ten worst states for food insecurity among aging populations. 

Residents and officials across Georgia are working to address the problem. GPB's Full Plates series is taking listeners around the state to learn about creative local solutions to food access problems.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

 Three to four days a week Ernestine Mims comes to the Senior Center in Twiggs County to eat lunch with her friends. On a recent afternoon, the women sat at a long table, covered in a yellow cloth.  Ernestine was clearly having fun.

“I laugh and talk, and I can go the day on, don’t think about nothing, no pains or nothing,” she said. “When I come up here I am able to forget about it. It’s just like a home away from home.” 

 


Leighton Rowell / GPB

Whether you go yellow or white, sweet or savory, grits are a Southern food staple now popping up on menus all over the country.

Food writer Erin Byers Murray goes deep in Grits: A Cultural and Culinary Journey Through the South, talking with growers, millers and chefs to understand the origins and evolution of grits. Along the way, she examines how race, gender and politics simmer in the significance of grits.


Emilia Brock / GPB News

The 2019 James Beard Awards Gala takes place next week in Chicago. Among the chefs and culinary creatives being celebrated, a different kind of innovator will join. That's Atlanta-based nonprofit The Giving Kitchen, which will be accepting the James Beard Humanitarian of the Year Award for its role in providing crisis grants, resources and assistance to food service workers.

 

 


Pam Fessler / NPR

Three-quarters of a million people would likely lose their food stamps later this year under a new proposal by the Trump administration. The goal is to encourage able-bodied adults to go to work and get off government aid. But opponents predict people would go hungry instead, if the rule goes into effect.

A public comment period, which ends Tuesday, has so far drawn more than 28,000 comments overwhelmingly against the proposed rule.


Courtesy of Chef Nolan Wynn

"On Second Thought" continues its Main Ingredient series in which a chef tells us about his or her essential Southern ingredient. 

For Chef Nolan Wynn, that ingredient is the peanut. He's the executive chef of Banshee in East Atlanta Village, which he co-founded with Faielle Stocco, Peter Chvala and Katie McDonald. "On Second Thought" host Virginia Prescott visited Wynn to learn how to make his savory peanut brittle.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

Every Sunday, Centenary United Methodist Church in Macon serves a free breakfast to anyone who needs it. For years Barb Fischer has been there, too, scraping plates clean before they hit the dishwasher. Why? She says she's in it for the hugs. 


Grant Blankenship / GPB

For almost a decade, a group of women from around Macon of various faiths, Judaism, Islam and Christianity,  have been meeting in an effort to push back against the misunderstandings between their faiths and to foster a sense of community.

Over the years they’ve had book clubs and service projects, but one constant in their group is their monthly lunches. Now, inspired by those lunches, the Women’s Interfaith Alliance of Central Georgia is putting together a cook book full of the recipes that have fed the members along their journey. 


Turning To 'Locavores' To Train New Hunters

Jan 3, 2019
Beau Cabell / Macon Telegraph

There's no shortage of deer in the wild and semi-wild places in Georgia. But as time marches on, the people that hunt deer are growing increasingly rare in the landscape.


In this week’s Medical Minute, Dr. Joseph Hobbs, Chairman of the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, discusses the connection between our taste buds and cells in our brain that helps us remember tastes, textures, and aromas of different foods.  The Medical Minute airs at 8:18 a.m., 1:20 p.m. and 5:18 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday on the 17 GPB radio stations across Georgia. For more Medical Minute episodes, visit the GPBNews.Org and search “The Medical Minute”.  The Medical Minute is written and produced by The Medical College of Georgia in collaboration with GPB-Augusta. 


Courtesy Jennifer Zyman

Several new restaurants consumed the spotlight in metro Atlanta in 2018. Each year, Atlanta Magazine’s “The Year In Food” considers those attention-getters from Mexican, to Ramen to good ol’ Southern style-dishes.

 

“On Second Thought” spoke with Atlanta Magazine food writer and critic Jennifer Zyman about her favorites of the year.


Atlanta-based chef Ronald Hsu stars on Netflix's reality competition cooking program, "The Final Table." It gathers 24 chefs from all over the world to compete in teams of two. Hsu partnered with Shin Takagi, owner and head chef of Zeniya in Japan, who also served as Hsu's mentor before the show.

Hsu joined "On Second Thought" to discuss his culinary inspirations and the world of reality TV cooking.

The state agency charged with making sure Georgia’s families have the necessities for living will issue disaster benefits in Southwest Georgia communities hit by Hurricane Michael. 

 

The month of emergency food benefits for many in South Georgia is over.

Bill Bolling / Atlanta Community Food Bank

Bill Bolling knew from his first experience at the community kitchen at St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Atlanta that he was destined for a life of service.

"I thought wow, this is it. After three college degrees and being a veteran — I even called my mother up and said, 'Mom! This is what God wants me to do,'" Bolling said. "Make soup!"

We spoke with Bill Bolling about founding the Atlanta Community Food Bank in 1979. The food bank has served over 750,000 people each year in Georgia. Bolling retired in 2015, but still actively works with food organizations like the Foodwell Alliance. He is also involved in collaborative efforts to combat poverty and housing inequality in the state.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

A little after sun up, the fleet of electrical linemen were on the roads of Dougherty County in southwest Georgia, but at the health department April Smith was on a different mission. She had a tree on the roof, no power and a hungry baby.

“Please, dear Lord I can't take any more,” she said to herself as she walked to the door of the health department. “She's got one can of formula. One can of formula. And I don't have food stamps to go buy it.”

The health department where she was hoping to find the formula was supposed to be open at 7 a.m. At 8:30 it still looked like a ghost town. So, no food for the baby.  Smith wasn’t sure what her next move was.


CNN

The late celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain changed the way a lot of people think and write about food. He traveled the world for his CNN show, Parts Unknown. From Nairobi to Atlanta, he brought us along for the ride. Bourdain took his life in June. On Sunday night, CNN debuted the final season of Parts Unknown. We look back on Bourdain’s legacy in the culinary world. 

Sean Powers / GPB

We launched a new "On Second Thought" series on Tuesday called “Main Ingredient” in which a chef tells us about his or her essential Southern ingredient. Host Virginia Prescott heads into the kitchen with Atlanta-based chef and cookbook author, Todd Richards. He shares with us his love for collard greens.

"Bacon, Collard and Fried Egg Sandwich" by Todd Richards

EatingInsectsAthens.com

There’s a conference happening in Athens, and its name tells you all you need to know: Eating Insects.  Members of the North American Coalition for Insects in Agriculture, scientists, chefs and others will discuss everything from the latest recipes to the ethics of eating bugs. 


Grant Blankenship / GPB

There’s something people think they know about the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as SNAP.

It’s the idea that people who use what we used to call food stamps spend their once monthly benefits on groceries almost immediately after they get them. When you look at averages, that’s true, and for some it can mean some lean and hungry days at the end of the month before the next round of SNAP benefits.

 

 


Leighton Rowell / GPB

"Barbecue Nation," a new exhibit at the Atlanta History Center, takes a deep dive into the history and culture of the South's most-loved food. But barbecue, like the South and the rest of the United States, is increasingly global. So "On Second Thought" is setting out on a series of roadtrips to see how different cultures and countries represented right here in Georgia do barbecue.

We started off with a visit to Chama Gaúcha, a Brazilian restaurant in the Buckhead neighborhood of Atlanta. Nelcir Muller, the general manager, took us inside the kitchen to show us how people in Brazil — South America's largest country — make their barbecue. In Portugeuse it's called "churrasco." 

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 


 

There’s a little dirt path leading from Pio Nono Avenue to what until not too long ago was a Kroger grocery store. The store’s closed now.

 

One morning before the closure, Shon Williams walked down the path, headed toward her apartment. Like a lot of people in this neighborhood, she can afford groceries, but she can’t afford a car.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

There's no future in crabbing.

That's the conclusion Earnest McIntosh, Sr. came to when his son, Ernest McIntosh, Jr. said he wanted to work with his father on the water near their home in Harris Neck, Ga., in McIntosh County. 

"I couldn't see a future into crabbing. But I could see it into oysters," McIntosh, Sr. said. 


Danielle Scott / flickr

All this year, we’ve paid homage to Southern food. Now, it’s time for cocktails.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought.

All this year, we have raised a glass to Southern food. From sweet tea to fried chicken, every Southern dish tells a story. Southern food scholar Adrian Miller and Ashli Stokes of the Center for the Study of the New South helped us dig into the history of mac and cheese, and how the creamy dish helps us understand Southern identity. 

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

The next time the you open your kitchen cabinets, consider this: a lot of the processed food we eat today started off as food for soldiers. The Army has a long history of culinary innovation that’s trickled down to our homes. We listened back to our conversation with writer Anastacia Marx de Salcedo, author of the book "Combat-Ready Kitchen: How the U.S.

Erika Beras for NPR

Culinary historian Michael Twitty traces his ancestry—both black and white—through food. In his memoir, "The Cooking Gene," he asks the question: "Who owns Southern food?" We talked with him ahead of his appearance on Thursday, Sept. 21 at 8 p.m.

Nicole Abalde / flickr

Food can evoke so many rich memories. A new book by Savannah food writer Jonathan Barrett captures some of the stories tied to Southern recipes. We talked with Barrett, author of the new book, Cook & Tell. We also heard from freelance writer Amy Condon, who contributed her own story to the book.

 

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