folk music

The folk-pop duo Lily & Madeleine are touring the country with their fourth album, "Canterbury Girls." They're a family duo, too – Lily and Madeleine Jurkiewicz are sisters – and they performed Tuesday at Eddie's Attic in Decatur.

Before continuing on their tour to Louisville, KY, the singer-songwriters stopped by "On Second Thought" for a conversation about finding their sound, leaving home and taking care of themselves – and one other – as they move up through the world and the music industry. 


Some say music holds the power to heal, and, on her album "Rifles and Rosary Beads," Nashville-based singer-songwriter Mary Gauthier directs that power to veterans.

"Rifles and Rosary Beads" is up for Best Folk Album at the Grammy Awards this weekend. Chuck Reece of "The Bitter Southerner Podcast" spoke with Gauthier about the songs, each of which Gauthier co-wrote with veterans and military spouses. 


The Bitter Southerner

In New York in the 1980s, Chuck Reece had his first job in journalism covering the media industry for Adweek magazine. That meant he got the first look at network television pilots and magazine protoypes, and every time any of those had something to do with the South, he said he only saw a couple of stereotypes. 

"One looked like the party scene from the beginning of 'Gone with the Wind' except maybe with updated clothing, and the other one looked like ... 'The Beverly Hillbillies' to 'Duck Dynasty,' most recently," Reece said. "Those two stereotypes just didn't fit the South that I grew up in and knew."


The music of Macon based band Mani exists at a nexus of styles.

The vocals are pushed deep into the mix of their first real release, icanthearwhattheyresayingbutithinkigetit, the better to focus on their mix of world music, math rock, noise and psychedelia.

Guitarist Zach Farr said the project started with his composing and recording on his own until a live band, featuring drummer Steve Ledbetter, started to jel sometime around 2013.

 

 

 

When she was a kid, SaVana Cameron says she loved to sing.

“But I never did voice lessons or anything like that,” she said.

She didn’t get serious until her senior year of high school when she landed a solo in the musical "Annie."

“After I did the solo that night a lot of people came up to me and said ‘You have a really pretty voice,’” she said.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Learning English is not easy.

That can be true even for immigrants to the United States who have had the benefit of the best education available in the countries where they grew up.

Now imagine you're a kid from a country torn apart by war or political unrest. You may be lucky to be literate in your first language. Taking a child like that from speaking no English to speaking the language well enough to go to high school is no mean feat.