Film Industry

Stills from Parallel Love: The Story of a Band Called Luxury

Going from punk rock to the priesthood is not a common progression. Then again, Georgia band Luxury never followed the rules.

A new film called Parallel Love: The Story of a Band Called Luxury follows the Toccoa and Athens group through their brush with death and, eventually, three members becoming Eastern Orthodox priests. The documentary feature makes its Georgia premiere at the Plaza Theatre in Atlanta on Wednesday, June 19 and at Ciné in Athens on Thursday, June 20.


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Hollywood's Golden Age and the rise of fascism in Europe were happening at the same time, a world apart. Those worlds collided when Hollywood decided to tackle fascism in film.

 

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington D.C. opened the exhibit Americans and the Holocaust last year. Now, a traveling event focuses on how depictions of the Nazi agenda influenced American audiences, and why we fought. The event, called What Were We Watching? Americans Response to Nazism Through Cinema, Radio and Media, takes place Tuesday night at the National Center for Civil and Human Rights. 

 

 


 

SCAD

On The Credits, we’ve talked to many people who dedicate their lives to Georgia's film and television industry, but what about the next generation of filmmakers? Host Kalena Boller visited the Savannah College of Art and Design to find out how the university is teaching cultural changes in the film industry.

Sean Powers / Georgia Public Broadcasting

As a cinematographer, Richard Vialet plays a central role in the way a movie looks. He told host Kalena Boller that requires understanding not just the set, but the surroundings … and the full story.

 

Sean Powers / Georgia Public Broadcasting

On this show, we have heard from many different people who work in Georgia’s film industry, but that industry has taken a life of its own off set. Case in point is Film Biz Recycling. This prop house on Savannah’s west side is working to clean up the environment. Host Kalena Boller spoke with Samita Wolfe, who runs the prop house with her husband.

Sean Powers / Georgia Public Broadcasting

Bolaji Bailey began working on sets in Georgia in the 1980s in the camera and electric departments. His son, Irie, followed in his dad’s footsteps as a grip. A grip is someone who builds and maintains the equipment for cameras. Bolaji and Irie have seen the state's film and teleivision industry change a lot. They talked with host Kalena Boller about how it's becoming more racially diverse.

Don Smith / Georgia Public Broadcasting

We start our second season of "The Credits" with an overview of how Georgia’s entertainment industry has become more inclusive.

The day before the Oscars, host Kalena Boller hosted a panel before a live audience at Georgia Public Broadcasting in Atlanta. The timing couldn’t have been better. Georgia was well represented at the awards

Joel C Ryan/Invision / Associated Press

In the weeks leading up to the Academy Awards, predictions about who will win are usually running full tilt. This year, the guesses are about the show itself. The Academy that produces the awards has gone back and forth on a host, what categories will be presented during the live broadcast and whether all the best song nominees will perform.

Beth Ward, the TV, film and book editor for ArtsATL, and Kalena Boller, host of the GPB podcast "The Credits," both joined "On Second Thought" to share their predictions on which films will take home a golden statue this weekend. They also shared their ideas on performances they wish had been nominated, like Emily Blunt's role in the horror film, "A Quiet Place."

Andre M / Wikimedia Commons

Georgia has been a major player in the music industry. Atlanta especially is a mecca for rap, hip-hop and R&B. Notable artists come here to record, and Georgia has been home to a number of famous names, including Ray Charles, Arrested Development, T.I., Ludacris and heavy metal band Mastodon.

 

Now, state legislators are working to make Georgia an even bigger hub for music and entertainment. Recently, Georgia Rep. Erica Thomas announced plans to co-chair a newly created Georgia Entertainment Caucus. She joined "On Second Thought," along with Grammy Award-winning music producer and engineer Matt Still, to discuss the caucus' potential impact.

 

Women and Hollywood / Twitter

If you see rows of trucks and traffic cones lining streets, they could signal new productions being filmed in Georgia. These projects, like HBO's upcoming comic book adaptation "Watchmen," contribute to Georgia's multi-billion dollar film industry.

 

Kalena Boller, host of GPB's "The Credits" podcast, joined "On Second Thought" to share her insider knowledge on new movies and television shows filmed in the state.


Evan Agostini / Invision/Associated Press

Atlanta native Chad Darnell hits the stage as Hedwig in a new Atlanta production of "Hedwig and the Angry Inch," opening at the Pinch 'N' Ouch Theatre on Jan. 10. The musical tells the story of Hedwig Robinson, a genderfluid German rock singer who navigates love, loss and identity.

 

Darnell joined "On Second Thought" to discuss the musical's impact over 20 years after its off-Broadway debut and why he's excited to perform in front of Atlanta audiences.

 


Terrell Sandefur

Terrell Sandefur has organized film festivals across the state in communities such as Atlanta, Rome, Columbus and Milledgeville. He even helped start the wildly popular Macon Film Festival, where he served as a film commissioner.

Sandefur tells host Kalena Boller about what it takes to make a film festival successful, and he shares his plans for spreading the word about Georgia's film industry at next month's Sundance Film Festival

Sean Powers

Location scout Jen Farris of Atlanta has her finger on the pulse of some of the city’s most historic neighborhoods. That makes her a valuable addition to any production.

Sean Powers / Georgia Public Broadcasting

On this show, we meet people who are jacks and jills of all trades in y’allywood.

One of those is Greg Waddle. He has several skills: camera operator, set dresser, art director. Being a true Renaissance movie man, he's also a key grip. This is a job many hear about, but barely understand. He talked with host Kalena Boller outside his warehouse in Atlanta.

The CW

Most of the people on this show work behind the scenes, but that doesn't mean we avoid talking to the stars.

 

Nafessa Williams has only been acting a few years, but she’s already made quite a splash with her role in The CW’s "Black Lightning." Her character, Anissa Pierce, is the first black, lesbian superheroine to appear on a network show.

 

Sean Powers / Georgia Public Broadcasting

Curtis Bonds Baker is like a fly on the wall in Georgia's film and television industry. He is a still photographer, who takes photos of the cast and crew on set.

 

His credits include a number of TV shows, such as FX’s "Atlanta,” MTV’s "Scream,” and Netflix's "Stranger Things." He told host Kalena Boller that a big part of his job is trying to remain invisible.

Sean Powers / Georgia Public Broadcasting

You’ll find many people in the film and television industry who wear many hats. One of them is Taraja Ramsess. He has credits in the art and camera departments, and he does stunt work.

 

He met host Kalena Boller in his workshop in Atlanta, where he was preparing set pieces for Netflix's "Stanger Things." Taraja discusses his career in Georgia’s diversifying film industry, and he talks about juggling the demands of parenthood and Y’allywood.

Qualen Bradley

Host Kalena Boller turns the spotlight on the recognizable but misunderstood job of the stand-in actor.

Two of them are Joel Ray Ishman and Qualen Bradley of Atlanta.

They discuss their experiences working on FX's "Atlanta," and the breakout Marvel Studios' film, "Black Panther." They also provide a glimpse  into the technical side of what being a stand-in actor means. 

Sean Powers / Georgia Public Broadcasting

Have you ever watched a movie and wondered how it all comes together?

On my GPB podcast, "The Credits," we'll find out.

On Second Thought For Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Mar 27, 2018

A teenager in Thomasville, Georgia is facing charges for allegedly stealing a gun from a car earlier in March. We've seen this problem across the state. In 2016 The Trace, an investigative news website, examined firearm theft in Atlanta and Savannah. finding Atlanta led many cities with its rate of guns stolen from automobiles. We spoke with Brian Freskos, a reporter who covers gun trafficking for The Trace. 

Reid Williams / GPB News

In the last year, Hollywood has been rocked by scandal. Some of the most powerful figures in the industry were accused of sexual misconduct. There’s an initiative in Georgia called Safety Shot that’s trying to address sexual abuse within the state’s film industry. We talked with two of Safety Shot’s founders: filmmaker Suzan Satterfield and actress Laura Lundy.

 Interview Highlights

The GOP tax bill has many concerned the law will negatively impact the middle class while bolstering the rich. But a new study from the union Actors Equity finds another problem: the tax bill could also harm Georgia’s film industry. They looked at how the plan might reduce deductions and reimbursements for contractors and part-time film workers. We talk about this with Chris Joyner with the Atlanta Journal-Constitution -- he writes the AJC Watchdog column. Also Craig Miller, Film Producer and Founder of Craig Miller Productions.

Savannah Area Film Office

The GOP tax bill has many concerned the law will negatively impact the middle class while bolstering the rich. But a new study from the union Actors Equity finds another problem: the tax bill could also harm Georgia’s film industry. They looked at how the plan might reduce deductions and reimbursements for contractors and part-time film workers.

GPB News / Emily Cureton

Georgia’s film industry supports many actors, producers, directors...and also classical musicians. Like Tracy Woodard. She’s a violinist in Atlanta. And on any given day, you might catch her recording soundtracks for a new TV show, film, or video game. She’s also founder of an event series where contemporary composers present new scores for very old, silent movies. Tracy talked to us about writing music for movies, and where composers experiment.

 

Atlanta’s the college football center of the world on Monday night, as the University of Georgia Dawgs try to stem the University of Alabama’s Tide, in the National Championship game. A win for Georgia would be the first national championship victory for the team in more than 35 years. We get a preview from GPB’s senior sports correspondent Jon Nelson and University of Georgia sports journalism professor Vicki Michaelis.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Veterans Day is this weekend. We meet a veteran named Bradley Field, who works in the film industry. Among his credits: "Detroit," "Suicide Squad," and "Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice." On Second Thought regular Kalena Boller caught up with Bradley just after production wrapped in Atlanta on "Den of Thieves," which is out next year.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Atlanta-based producer Will Packer’s new movie “Girls Trip” is doing quite well. It cost about $19 million to make, and it has grossed more than $90 million since opening in theaters last month. We talked with Will Packer last week about making hit movies with diverse casts, and his TV project “Black America.”

 

Music for American films is produced almost entirely in New York or Los Angeles. But as the film industry booms in Georgia, the demand for locally sourced musicians is growing. The newly formed Peach State Orchestra looks to meet that demand by becoming the first premiere movie scoring orchestra in Georgia. We talk with founder and conductor Phillip Allen.

The Rise Of Women In TV And Film

Aug 1, 2017
coolloud / Flickr

"Wonder Woman" became the highest grossing box office film this summer. And the movie "Girls Trip," which features an all-female cast, was second at the box office the weekend before last. Finally, women are taking the leads in films and in television.

Jury: Railroad To Pay $3.9M For Train Death Of Film Worker

Jul 18, 2017
Colin Duran via AP

A railroad owner must pay $3.9 million to the family of a movie worker killed on a Georgia railroad trestle in 2014, a jury decided Monday in civil verdict that found the company shared in the blame for the deadly freight train collision even though the film crew was trespassing.

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