FDA

Contributed by Lauren Caccavone

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday announced a voluntary recall for textured breast implants that have been connected to rare cancer.

Allergan, the manufacturer of a specific type of breast implant, agreed to recall specific models of its textured breast implants from the U.S. market due to the risk of breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

Contributed (left image), Fabi Lovell (right image)

Jennifer Butler lost part of her right breast after she was diagnosed with malignant melanoma. She was 22. A year later, she got silicone breast implants. She said she remembers doctors telling her — pushing her — toward silicone implants, describing them in 2009 as “new and improved” after having been taken off the market previously and now returned as safer than ever.

She's one of many women and doctors in Georgia who say breast implants caused systemic illness.

The Trump administration has said it wants to remove burdensome regulation, and on Monday it served up a taste of what that looks like when it comes to two aspects of food policy: school lunch and calorie labels on menus.

Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue announced a plan to delay a mandate that would require schools to further reduce sodium levels in the meals they serve. In addition, Perdue wants to give the green light to schools that want to serve some grains that aren't whole-grain rich.

In a meeting with business leaders, President Trump on Monday made an eyebrow-raising claim.

As part of an effort to make America more business-friendly, Trump said: "We think we can cut regulations by 75 percent. Maybe more, but by 75 percent."

Republicans do seem serious about some kind of regulatory reform. But even conservative economists say that number is not believable.

It has been said that the president likes to have an adversary. And at the meeting, Trump took aim at government regulations that stifle business.

Before Luke Whitbeck began taking a $300,000-a-year drug, the 2-year-old's health was inexplicably failing.

A pale boy with enormous eyes, Luke frequently ran high fevers, tired easily and was skinny all over, except his belly stuck out like a bowling ball.

"What does your medicine do for you?" Luke's mother, Meg, asked after his weekly drug treatment recently.

The 21st Century Cures Act now being refined by the lame duck Congress is one of the most-lobbied health care bills in recent history, with nearly three lobbyists working for its passage or defeat for every lawmaker on Capitol Hill.

More than 1,455 lobbyists representing 400 companies, universities and other organizations pushed for or against a House version of a Cures bill this congressional cycle, according to federal disclosure forms compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics.