Evangelicals

The ransomware attack that crippled Atlanta a few weeks ago isn't the only high-profile cyberattack Georgia has faced in recent years. Two years ago, a security researcher gained unauthorized access to a server used by Kennesaw State University's Center for Election Systems, which stores the data of millions of Georgia voters. At the time, the data breach wasn't illegal under Georgia law —  but a new bill awaiting Gov. Nathan Deal's signature could change that. Senate Bill 315 defines unauthorized computer access as a crime under Georgia law, which would make data breaches easier to prosecute. Some people in the tech industry, however, worry SB 315 could actually hinder their ability to do their jobs.

Summer Evans / GPB

A few weeks ago, we talked about the shift in attendance of African Americans in evangelical churches.

The Pew Research Center finds only 10 percent of African Americans in Georgia identified as Evangelical Protestant in 2014. Nationwide, it’s even lower.

With fewer and fewer African-Americans attending evangelical churches, we asked two evangelical pastors about their efforts to make their congregation inclusive. 

Summer Evans / GPB

African-American churchgoers have increasingly disappeared from church pews in recent years.

When it comes to predominantly white evangelical churches, the absence of black congregants looms even larger. 

In 2014, the Pew Research Center found only 14 percent of African Americans in Georgia identified as an Evangelical Protestant. The national average is even lower.

When Donald Trump announced he would be running for president, he didn't seem like the obvious candidate for evangelical voters, given his multiple divorces, use of crass language and one-time admission that he had never asked God for forgiveness.

Nonetheless, he did manage to coalesce 81 percent of white evangelical voters behind him in November.

Updated at 5:38 p.m. ET

President Trump spoke to one of the most faithful blocs of his base on Friday, telling attendees of this year's Values Voter Summit that in America "we don't worship government, we worship God."

America was founded on principles of religious freedom. But Christianity dominates politics today. How this happened is the subject of a new book by Frances Fitzgerald. It’s called "The Evangelicals: The Struggle to Shape America." In it, Frances Fitzgerald documents the rise and potential fall of America’s largest religious movement. She joined us to talk about the history and influence of evangelicalism.